Profile

Cover photo
Denis Wallez
Works at koan.mu
Attended International Buddhist College
Lives in Rhône-Alpes
349,829 followers|5,900,169 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
« it really doesn’t make sense to say that religion is at war with science. You can say that for some people, religion is clearly linked to less science acceptance — especially on evolution. But for others, clearly, religion presents no hurdle at all. »
Pamela Zuppo originally shared to Progressive Politics:
 
The surprising links between faith and evolution and climate denial — charted

The circle sizes are scaled so that their areas are in proportion to the relative population sizes in Pew’s massive sample (nearly 36,000 people!). And as you can see, while at the top right atheists, agnostics, Buddhists, non-Orthodox Jews and others strongly accept evolution and environmental rules, at the bottom left Southern Baptists, Pentecostals and other more conservative leaning faiths are just as skeptical of both.

Obviously, it is important to emphasize that a given individual, of any faith, could be anywhere on the chart above — it’s just that this is where the denominations as a whole seemed to fall out, based on Rosenau’s analysis (which itself mirrors prior analyses of the political alignments of U.S. faiths and denominations by political scientist and Religion News Service blogger Tobin Grant).

One possible way of interpreting the figure is that as with political parties themselves, people at least partially self-sort into faiths or denominations that seem more consonant with their own worldviews. And thus, a cluster of issue stances may travel alongside these choices of affiliation. “People are choosing what religion they want to associate with,” suggested Rosenau. “If people feel alienated from a church, they’re switching.”

There may also be a substantive point here that links together the ideas. A view of the world that thinks of human beings as having evolved, as being part of the natural world and having emerged through the same process as other organisms, may also be related to a manner of thinking that puts great overall emphasis on the value of nature and one’s connectedness with it.

In any case, while the pattern below may require more analysis, one clear punchline of the figure is that it really doesn’t make sense to say that religion is at war with science. You can say that for some people, religion is clearly linked to less science acceptance — especially on evolution. But for others, clearly, religion presents no hurdle at all.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/05/20/this-chart-explains-why-faith-and-science-dont-have-to-be-in-conflict/
6 comments on original post
4
1
Brian Fitzgerald's profile photo
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
59
9
Maryam Ghaini's profile photoCBpersuasion's profile photoEquine Australia's profile photoWarren Deer's profile photo
6 comments
 
Yes it is breathtaking!!
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
The heart of sadness (2/3) — separation from the loved

   Follow-up on "the heart of sadness (1/3) — conceptual framework" (www.koan.mu/sadness1.htm), with the focus on a practical  example, a specific form of dukkha.
   How deep and nuanced can discernment reach, when investigating dissatisfaction? Can we identify which 'object' we most cling to? Can we realise how 'separation' also applies to the simple, undramatic ending of the honey-moon period?

   Initially, the posts were meant to be two, but this is now becoming a three-posts mini-series.

#Buddhism #Dharma  
26
2
Moe Lipps's profile photoYohan K's profile photoDenis Wallez's profile photoAnne-Marie Valton's profile photo
5 comments
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
Do not harm

   Regularly, people think that pacifism and «do not harm» messages are shallow, a bit hippie, "flower power" or naïve.
   These peaceful messages seem easy to disregard, by coming up with narratives of "not letting others abuse you" and of circumstances when one would supposedly 'need' to resort to violence…

   But such a reaction is a pathetic obsession with oneself. To automatically interpret «do not harm» as being about oneself is ridiculously self-centred.
   When discriminations are discussed, some people react saying "I don't do this",  making a wide issue suddenly limited to themselves personally (and therefore not so much about the victims in need of help!). It's a classic of e.g. the "not all men"  response or of e.g. the "I have black friends"  response.
   Similarly, some people react to "do not harm" thinking "I don't do this";  but it's not what it's about.

   It's in fact relevant, and wholesome, to reflect on how one personally impacts others, e.g. via one's consumption.
   It's easy to harm others by negligence (from the pollution generated by a big, ego-boosting, petrol-hungry car… to the working conditions in China required for the relatively low cost of particular electronic gadgets); vigilance and awareness are our best allies against negligence.
   Reflecting on one's direct impact is an important step… but it is only a first step! The next step is to think how we can favour conditions and circumstances in which other parties's impacts will become more wholesome too… Not doing what one could do in order to help might be seen as a negligence.

   This 22'08'' video from TED addresses important issues. No easy solution, but if we consider "seeing reality as it is" then we shouldn't corner ourselves in easy explanations or self-congratulations: awareness is the necessary first step for positive contributions to arise.


   « when our grandchildren ask us  "Grandma, Grandpa, where were you when two billion of the world's poorest were drowning in a lawless chaos of everyday violence?" I hope we can say that we had compassion, that we raised our voice, and as a generation, we were moved to make the violence stop. »
— Gary Haugen


#engagedBuddhism #nonviolence  
 
This talk states that billions of people remain in poor conditions because they are continuously under threat.
#noprogresswithoutjustice  
Collective compassion has meant an overall decrease in global poverty since the 1980s, says civil rights lawyer Gary Haugen. Yet for all the world's aid money, there's a pervasive hidden problem keeping poverty alive. Haugen reveals the dark underlying cause we must recognize and act on now.
View original post
29
4
Denis Wallez's profile photoAlessandro B.'s profile photoWarren Deer's profile photoVenus Heard's profile photo
3 comments
 
Make Peace The Issue
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
A quote from Jan Chozen Bays (given without attribution below).

#Buddhism   #Dharma   #generosity  
 
GENEROSITY IS LETTING GO OF “ME”

The Buddha spoke constantly of the value of generosity, saying it is the most effective way to reach enlightenment. He recommended giving simple gifts — pure water to drink, food, shelter, clothing, transportation, light, flowers. Even poor people can be generous, he said, by giving a crumb of their food to an ant. Each time we give something away, whether it is a material object or our time (it is “ours”?), we are letting go of a bit of that carefully gathered and fiercely defended temporary heap of stuff we call, “I, me, and mine.”

#Buddha #Buddhism #Buddhist #Bodhi #Bodhicitta #Bodhisattva #Compassion #DalaiLama #Dhamma #Dharma #enlightenment #Guru #Khenpo #Lama #Mahayana #Mahasiddha #mindfulness #monks #Monastery #monastics #path #quotes #Rinpoche #sayings #spiritual #Teachings #Tibet #Tibetan #Tulku #Vajrayana #Venerable #wisdom
View original post
50
3
Chanita Loud's profile photoPaul R (Keido)'s profile photoWarren Deer's profile photoLawrence Epps's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Rei Alexandra I appreciate Denis wallez...I'm loving this world..life..new experience and change and a new direction
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
Dear +Google+, collections seemed a good idea…
… until one meets the bugs, that is ;-) Or undesirable features!

   Let's start with what will stop me straight away from using it.
   For the most professionals: the "download data" capability from one's google account (e.g. to safeguard one's g+ stream, etc.) will declare any "public" post migrated to a public collection as "privately shared".  It won't tell however that it is "shared to a collection" (let alone to which collection…).
   So if, based on JSON extraction, one has some post-processing to treat one's posts automatically (e.g. reposting them somewhere else) except the private posts (which one doesn't want to share publicly somewhere else…), then the filter will suddenly exclude many posts which were considered public  until now but disappear into public  collections as if private…
   Example of webpage generated from google+ post (JSON extracted from official  www.google.com/settings/takeout): www.koan.mu/gplus/ggase6dTwLG automatically generated from plus.google.com/+DenisWallez/posts/ggase6dTwLG
   It would seem pretty obvious that a 'public' post reclassified in a 'public' collection should remain 'public', or switch from 'public' to 'public collection' but not to 'private'…


   For the more common user, who doesn't post-process the stream, maybe new posts are great but 'reclassification' of old posts can be problematic: a reported bug means that some shares prove 'resharable' to collections without problem, while some other shares stubbornly refuse the transfer —any attempt to do so ends up creating a new post (dated now, instead of the initial share date) and losing any 'intro' of the first share (just like reshares of shares usually drop any in-between contribution).


   Oh, and posts to collections cannot be posted to circles at the same time (just like posts in communities cannot)… which basically kills the notion of "notification circle".
   One might think that, as collections have a notification mechanism themselves ('off' by default), any "notification circle" could be dropped and collections used instead. All well and good if one could configure some circle to have the collection with notification 'on' by default… Not so great if you might just end up dropping people who do not log regularly and might miss any 'announcement' post informing them to switch to the new mechanism. Losing activity on the ghost town doesn't seem particularly desirable.


#collection  
22
5
Edward Morbius's profile photoPam Adger's profile photoGeorge Station's profile photoRon K Jeffries's profile photo
2 comments
 
"Compartimentalising" as in "you cannot share a post in multiple collections"?  ;-) Tick!
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
349,829 people
Justo Zapon's profile photo
Carolene Timmons's profile photo
El Chato's profile photo
Abhi Kunjumole's profile photo
ogala chinonso's profile photo
Bruce Alan Investigations's profile photo
dick fermana's profile photo
Victoria Ventura's profile photo
bri pack's profile photo

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
Flag of Planet Earth,
a proposal by Oskar Pernefeldt (www.oskarpernefeldt.com)

« Centered in the flag, seven rings form a flower – a symbol of the life on Earth. The rings are linked to each other, which represents how everything on our planet, directly or indirectly, are linked. The blue field represents water which is essential for life – also as the oceans cover most of our planet's surface. The flower's outer rings form a circle which could be seen as a symbol of Earth as a planet and the blue surface could represent the universe. »

www.flagofplanetearth.com


Oskar Pernefeldt is from Sweden, Sweden from which Måns Zelmerlöw just won the eurovision (www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoO1V_eOEPA).
h/t +Sergiu Naslau 
142
24
Katina T.'s profile photoArachne Blue's profile photoColinda Bennett's profile photoPrev Rosene's profile photo
39 comments
 
The arth already have a flag... and it; s not this one..
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
The heart of sadness (3/3) — lingering taste

   Follow-up on "the heart of sadness (2/3) — separation from the loved" (www.koan.mu/sadness2.htm), exploring how the pain of separation is perpetuated long after the event itself.

   Separation forces us to reckon with impermanence, but what happens if we still nurture the wrong view that a phenomenon has an essence?


#Buddhism #Dharma
16
6
Kevin Lee Cogdill York's profile photoBrad Radziej's profile photoAmber Martin's profile photoAnne-Marie Valton's profile photo
9 comments
 
If I may add from my own journey, I have found a very real difference between Detachment and Nonattachment that is strongly reality based and not just word play or semantic.
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
   In yesterday's post (« do not harm », gplus.wallez.name/7rvA9BK4p5Z), I wrote « It's in fact relevant, and wholesome, to reflect on how one personally impacts others, e.g. via one's consumption. » The below 1'45'' social experiment helps some strangers to reflect.


#engagedBuddhism  
h/t +Hiền T Quan
26
8
HiFrecuncy isWhatMatters's profile photoRoberto Martina's profile photo
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
the heart of sadness (1/3) — conceptual framework

#buddhism #Dharma  
33
7
Clemente Zamora's profile photoPaul R (Keido)'s profile photoAlessandro B.'s profile photoMindah-Lee Kumar (The Enthusiastic Buddhist)'s profile photo
9 comments
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
h/t +Tim Osmar 
 
The Karmapa offered an explanation for the specific restrictions associated with refuge in the Buddha, the Dharma and the sangha, respectively. Discussing the advice related to taking refuge in the Buddha—that of not taking refuge in mundane gods—he cautioned that Buddhists and especially Vajrayana practitioners might be in danger of violating that restriction.

“Where I think that there can be an overt contradiction to the vow of refuge,” His Holiness said, “is when someone conceives of a yidam deity as some sort of external god to whom they make offerings in order to please them, with the expectation that the yidam, the god, give them whatever they want, no matter what they do or how they behave. People who have that attitude will think, ‘It does not matter what I do; the yidam will fix it and give me whatever I want.’ That attitude contradicts the vow of refuge. The problem is that you are relating to a yidam deity as you would relate to a mundane god, which is unfitting.

“The Buddha’s intention in forbidding taking refuge in mundane gods was that when we do so, we are failing to change ourselves for the better, because we think that the god being worshipped will take care of all our needs. The Buddha’s point was that we need to take authentic refuge by gradually becoming sources of refuge unto ourselves, which requires change and development.”

~In Kingston, Karmapa Offers Refuge to those Seeking Refuge
http://the17thkarmapa.blogspot.tw/2015/04/in-kingston-karmapa-offers-refuge-to.html

(Art by Rabkar Wangchuk: Attachment)
1 comment on original post
34
1
Andrei Volkov's profile photoDavid Washington's profile photoDenis Wallez's profile photoEvelyn Mitchell's profile photo
5 comments
 
« Jesus is one of the Buddha, or student of buddhism in his past as you once explained to me. »
   I wasn't as affirmative as this, +Naga R Dhoopati: "may be" is not "is".
   What I wrote was (with bold added for clarification):
« there's a reasonably plausible possibility that Jesus was influenced by Buddhism, during his "missing years" (between the ages of around 12 to 28 or 30).
   Buddhism had long started influencing west-ward by then. Contact with Greek culture is notably attested by how buddhist sculptures evolved in Gandhāra, after the Greco-Bactrian invasions. Wars between different groups of Bactrian Greeks resulted in the independence of Gandhara from Bactria and the formation of the Indo-Greek kingdom. Menander  was its most famous king, who became a Buddhist and is remembered in Buddhists records due to his discussions with a great Buddhist philosopher, Nāgasena,  in the Milinda Panha.
   So Jesus did not need to travel far to come into contact with some merchants or even buddhist  wanderers. Maybe he indeed became an arahant  during the missing years, then he did  let go of the raft, and found the appropriate way to guide different people in a different context with different (cultural) views and defilements… and this would in no way threaten whatever the Bible says about Jesus! »

   We can favour interfaith work and look for commonalities without going as far as pretending it's all exactly the same. "Might be" and questions are more constructive and wholesome than "is" and certainties. Forms are empty, but emptiness is form too: don't fall in the extreme of denying nuances.
Add a comment...

Denis Wallez

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
I thought this was interesting....
Mindfulness practice increases our capacity to ride the waves of pleasure and pain.
11 comments on original post
29
4
Jas Dullat's profile photoHiền T Quan's profile photoClemente Zamora's profile photoMarek Schmidt's profile photo
2 comments
 
One of the Mahavakyas.. And basically all the mahavakyas also suggest this..
" so 'hum" etc...
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
349,829 people
Justo Zapon's profile photo
Carolene Timmons's profile photo
El Chato's profile photo
Abhi Kunjumole's profile photo
ogala chinonso's profile photo
Bruce Alan Investigations's profile photo
dick fermana's profile photo
Victoria Ventura's profile photo
bri pack's profile photo
Education
  • International Buddhist College
    M.A. in Buddhist Studies, 2012 - 2015
    Theravāda Buddhism, History of Indian Buddhism, Mahāyāna Buddhism, Buddhism and Society, Lamrim Chenmo, Buddhism In Japan, Theravāda Abhidhamma, Chinese Buddhist Thought, Bodhisattva Ideal, Buddhist Psychotherapy, Survey of the Doctrines of the Abhidharma Schools — independent research on "Japanese Buddhism in the Tale of Genji"
  • Chartered Institute for Securities & Investments
    Certificates in Securities & in Derivatives + annual CPD certificates, 2007 - 2012
    FSA-approved Financial Advisor + individual charter (2009–2012)
  • French Air Force
    Certificat d'Aptitude Militaire, 2000
    Sergent (R)
  • École Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications de Bretagne
    M.Sc. in Telecommunications (ingénieur), 1993 - 1996
    Computer science (major in «Parallel and Distributed Computing»), maths, physics, economics, foreign languages (fluent: English, Spanish) — options (Japanese & art history).
  • Lycée du Parc, Lyon
    Math'Sup' & Math'spé' M, 1991 - 1993
    major in mathematics; minor in physics — ∫ x.dx = 3/2
  • Lycée Lumière, Lyon
    Baccalauréat C, 1991
    majors in mathematics & physics; minor in biology
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Story
Tagline
«Intentions do matter.»
Introduction
For the time being, my g+ posts are voluntarily limited to Buddhism (as an Eastern mix of philosophy and psychology, not so much as a religion). However, in relation to Buddhism, nothing is considered off-limits!
My primary take on Buddhism is «Might as well be happy, since we're here!» The secondary take addresses how we can cease dissatisfaction in practical terms (considering that mundane life is not an obstacle to the dharma).

Given my other interests and experiences, I might however comment —sometimes at length— on others' posts regarding investment banking, economics, economic policies, politics; computer science, networks; philosophy, psychology;  typography, photography, sculpture; aikido, iaido; music; argentinian tango dancing…


As a dharma teacher, I do not sell exclusive content, or access, to the lucky few… so I live on donations and crowd-funding. So if you appreciate my work and see value in it (for yourself or for others), please consider supporting me by monthly or one-off donations (via Paypal). This is important: many teachers and temples vanished in the past and many more vanish today, when everyone uses easy cop-outs and counts on supposed 'others' to let the teachers live.


Popular original posts (based on +1's) included:

The most commented-upon post is: Vegetarianism and lay buddhists

The popular «meditation» series is now accessible via koan.mu/meditation.htm

The «karmic continuation» series is: 1. Capitalism, 2. Dualistic views, 3. "The end justifies the means", 4. Arms race, 5. News (Newtown, MA)

The «Christianity and Zen Buddhism» series: part 1 with annexpart 2part 3, …


I am not a big fan of clinging, and so I quite naturally reject "clinging to traditional translations because they're classical." This includes the usual translation of the four noble truths (classic presentation): cf. the four tasks of the noble one, cf. life is pleasurable and ordinary minds can't get enough of it, cf. "on clinging to a particular translation of the 'four noble truths'."

Finally, if you wonder about who granted me my 'authority' as a teacher, or as a priest, or where I learnt, or who certified or confirmed whatever attainment… I don't tell! However, my reasons are openly communicated; so you're free to make your own choices.
Work
Occupation
Buddhist teacher
Skills
Listening & responding with compassion, loving-kindness, sympathetic joy and equanimity… Cutting through veils of ignorance (notably ignorance of logic and of causality)
Employment
  • koan.mu
    teacher, 2012 - present
    Many different labels (teacher, ajahn, 師傅, गुरु, 先生, sir…), only one function: transmission of knowledge and tools, to support further enquiry! Learning never stops.
  • various banks
    investment banker, 1996 - 2012
    Quant'; Head of "R&D"; Head of "model risk"; Trader; Product development lead… but also mentor, coach, trainer, teacher, volunteer, first aider…
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Rhône-Alpes
Previously
Amiens - Lyon - Plouzané (France) - Budapest (Hungary) - Paris (France) - Bruxelles (Belgium) - London (United Kingdom) - Chennai (India)
Contact Information
Work
Email