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Dementia Prevention Center
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Prevention of dementia and treatment for those affected by identification of the cause of brain damage to that individual.
Prevention of dementia and treatment for those affected by identification of the cause of brain damage to that individual.

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The brain is believed to have one hundred billion neurons. Two to three million neurons are related to the five senses and a few hundred thousand neurons are responsible for all motor function. Each functional unit or neuron column is estimated to contain fifty to one hundred neurons; however additional accurate studies in humans are needed to study the different brain regions.
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Very often we evaluate individuals who are told they have chronic ischemic white matter changes - punctate lesions - white matter hyperintensities - white matter changes - chronic changes - age related changes - The descriptive list does go on a bit... In the end the individual struggles with the meaning of what the MRI shows. Keeping it simple - what you see is scar. If they do not grow in size then the condition is properly treated or has run its local course. If over time there are an increase in number of the lesions then you need to be sure and complete an accurate medical evaluation that will cover all of the main reasons for these lesions. Here we focus a bit on the most important aspect of a hypercoaguable state. A perturbation of the flow and clotting of blood that ends. Additional descriptions can be found in radiology reports and one finds that they are mostly describing the same process - scar. Some additional examples are white matter disease, leukoaraiosis, age related white matter changes, white matter hyperintensities, lacunar infarcts, chronic microvascular changes, chronic microvascular ischemic changes, small vessel disease, periventricular white matter changes - All are terms used to describe that the radiology team can see damage on the brain MRI. Keep in mind that while concentration on even the smallest area of damage (10 micron) is important - the radiology team usually will only be able to see areas of damage that are 1000 microns in size. Often even these are too small for them to make specific comments on and the size ends up being more in the range of 5000 microns before it is called a lesion
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Very often we evaluate individuals who are told they have chronic ischemic white matter changes - punctate lesions - white matter hyperintensities - white matter changes - chronic changes - age related changes - The descriptive list does go on a bit... In the end the individual struggles with the meaning of what the MRI shows. Keeping it simple - what you see is scar. If they do not grow in size then the condition is properly treated or has run its local course. If over time there are an increase in number of the lesions then you need to be sure and complete an accurate medical evaluation that will cover all of the main reasons for these lesions. Here we focus a bit on the most important aspect of a hypercoaguable state. A perturbation of the flow and clotting of blood that ends. Additional descriptions can be found in radiology reports and one finds that they are mostly describing the same process - scar. Some additional examples are white matter disease, leukoaraiosis, age related white matter changes, white matter hyperintensities, lacunar infarcts, chronic microvascular changes, chronic microvascular ischemic changes, small vessel disease, periventricular white matter changes - All are terms used to describe that the radiology team can see damage on the brain MRI. Keep in mind that while concentration on even the smallest area of damage (10 micron) is important - the radiology team usually will only be able to see areas of damage that are 1000 microns in size. Often even these are too small for them to make specific comments on and the size ends up being more in the range of 5000 microns before it is called a lesion
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Hypercoaguable state evaluation discussed as reason for white matter lesions found on MRI of brain.
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So you or your family member was given a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s?
The problem is that the medical team was not able to tell you the reason for the medical problem. Being given a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is better understood as being told that the current medical team has identified damage to the brain that is causing a profound problem with mind and memory. Current medical terminology has many ways to explain that you have damage to the brain. Some ways to describe this damage are currently designated as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, essential tremor, acephalgic migraine, movement disorder, frontotemporal dementia (dementia lacking distinct histopathologic features), vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, optic neuritis, mixed dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or multiple sclerosis; all remain a “diagnosis of exclusion.”

However, when all of the potential factors that can cause damage to neurons are not considered, then the diagnosis remains incomplete.
A complete and accurate investigation including all of the potential causes of micron stroke converts many of the “diagnosis of exclusion” into a diagnosis based upon the results of the investigation. For comparison one can consider the treatment approach and strategy when dealing with disease of the brain based upon etiology, as examples: Vasculitis, sacroidosis, Behcet’s disease, space-occupying lesions, systemic lupus ertythematosis, Lyme disease, Wilson’s disease, lysosomal disorders, or CNS lymphoma.

You can also join the discussion at https://www.dementiapreventioncenter.com/what-if-its-not-alzheimers/
What if its not Alzheimer's?
What if its not Alzheimer's?
dementiapreventioncenter.com
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So you or your family member was given a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s?
The problem is that the medical team was not able to tell you the reason for the medical problem. Being given a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is better understood as being told that the current medical team has identified damage to the brain that is causing a profound problem with mind and memory. Current medical terminology has many ways to explain that you have damage to the brain. Some ways to describe this damage are currently designated as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, essential tremor, acephalgic migraine, movement disorder, frontotemporal dementia (dementia lacking distinct histopathologic features), vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, optic neuritis, mixed dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or multiple sclerosis; all remain a “diagnosis of exclusion.”

However, when all of the potential factors that can cause damage to neurons are not considered, then the diagnosis remains incomplete.
A complete and accurate investigation including all of the potential causes of micron stroke converts many of the “diagnosis of exclusion” into a diagnosis based upon the results of the investigation. For comparison one can consider the treatment approach and strategy when dealing with disease of the brain based upon etiology, as examples: Vasculitis, sacroidosis, Behcet’s disease, space-occupying lesions, systemic lupus ertythematosis, Lyme disease, Wilson’s disease, lysosomal disorders, or CNS lymphoma.

You can also join the discussion at https://www.dementiapreventioncenter.com/what-if-its-not-alzheimers/
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So you or your family member was given a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s?
The problem is that the medical team was not able to tell you the reason for the medical problem. Being given a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is better understood as being told that the current medical team has identified damage to the brain that is causing a profound problem with mind and memory. Current medical terminology has many ways to explain that you have damage to the brain. Some ways to describe this damage are currently designated as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, essential tremor, acephalgic migraine, movement disorder, frontotemporal dementia (dementia lacking distinct histopathologic features), vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, optic neuritis, mixed dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or multiple sclerosis; all remain a “diagnosis of exclusion.”

However, when all of the potential factors that can cause damage to neurons are not considered, then the diagnosis remains incomplete.
A complete and accurate investigation including all of the potential causes of micron stroke converts many of the “diagnosis of exclusion” into a diagnosis based upon the results of the investigation. For comparison one can consider the treatment approach and strategy when dealing with disease of the brain based upon etiology, as examples: Vasculitis, sacroidosis, Behcet’s disease, space-occupying lesions, systemic lupus ertythematosis, Lyme disease, Wilson’s disease, lysosomal disorders, or CNS lymphoma.

You can also join the discussion at https://www.dementiapreventioncenter.com/what-if-its-not-alzheimers/
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Second free memory workshop.
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Memory workshop intro class - October 2017. Beginner class November 2017 - use this video to catch up!
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Treatment of Alzheimer's disease and dementia is a challenging task. I need some feedback #critique This is a functional unit in the brain - composed of five different cell types (and different colors). I need to be able to use the model in animation from both distance and for some up close images. I was wondering if the Blender community could give some thoughts on how to adjust lighting or improve on the way to "show" the different cells. I have a pile of different Fstops and vignette - they do help - yet in trying to tell the story about how to treat Alzheimer's disease and other dementia the image becomes a bit confusing to the eye.

What is amazing is that the image becomes confusing to anyone to view - and it is a really cut back and simplified version of what is really happening inside our brain! Any input would be helpful and I will continue to work on the project.

I did try to use some HDRI for light - but nothing fit the "mood" for anything that is natural. I did try an operating room - but that was no good. Using the blender world and running it thru a hue saturation gave me the current background.

the project is vertex heavy at 1.4 million.
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7/27/17
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