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Delaware Integrative Medicine
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intervention for pain, injury and inflammation
intervention for pain, injury and inflammation

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PARTICIPATE IN A STUDY TO EVALUATE LYME DISEASE TEST.
Participate in study to evaluate a new diagnostic test for Lyme disease.
Delaware Integrative Medicine is participating in a multicenter study to evaluate a Borrelia Diagnostic Test in subjects with early stage or late stage Lyme Disease.
For more criteria for participation visit: http://bit.ly/29ICJie

For more information, please call Delaware Integrative Medicine at 302.258.8853

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PATIENTS LIVING IN LYME DISEASE 'MEDICAL LIMBO'

The health issues piled up for Donna Lugar, one on top of another: She had breathing trouble, vision and hearing problems, even heart issues, but finding a cause was elusive.
"Occasionally I would get a diagnosis," said the 55-year-old Halifax resident. "But a lot of tests were coming back negative."

By 2010, almost a decade after her problems began, Lugar said she was diagnosed with tetanus, but treatment didn't help. Finally, in September 2011, she found a doctor in Cape Breton who diagnosed and treated her for Lyme disease.

PERSISTENT PROBLEMS
Lugar said a large part of her problem is that she never presented to doctors with a classic indicator of Lyme disease: a bull's-eye rash. "I never saw an attached tick and I never saw a bull's-eye rash," said Lugar. "To this day I can't tell you with 100 per cent accuracy that, 'Yes I have tick-borne diseases,' because there is not a test that can tell you."

Lugar says she is far from alone. She and other advocates say persistent problems in the fight against Lyme disease — including a lack of awareness, diagnosis and treatment by doctors — has left large numbers of patients frustrated as they battle chronic symptoms. They say those problems need to be addressed as the prevalence of the bacterial infection caused by black-legged ticks increases and as federal health officials develop a new plan for the prevention, identification and treatment of the disease.

Canada's chief public health officer, Dr. Gregory Taylor, Canada's chief public health officer, believes more needs to be done for patients like Lugar who feel abandoned by a system that is still learning about a disease that is only now emerging as a growing health threat. Early detection of Lyme usually results in treatment through a short course of antibiotics, however Taylor said symptoms of early-stage Lyme are often vague and initial lab tests don't work well.

"We don't have a good lab test that detects the bug in your bloodstream," he said. "We look for antibodies and those don't get produced for several days after one is infected and so early on the test can be absolutely negative." But many doctors are reluctant to treat with antibiotics, and "for good reason," because they can cause as much harm as benefit.

ISSUES WITH TREATMENT
Dr. William Bowie, of the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Canada, said prolonged courses of antibiotics are problematic given their associated risks and medical doubts about whether people with so-called chronic Lyme even have the disease.

Bowie, an infectious disease specialist, said the risks include things such as allergic reactions, gastro-intestinal problems, and interference with bile flow. As well he said future infections could end up harder to treat because of built-up antibiotic resistance.
"For people who have clear Lyme disease I'm totally happy to use those drugs, because we have good evidence that they work and the benefits exceed the risk," said Bowie.
But he said the viewpoint of infectious disease doctors changes when it comes to diagnosis and treatment that aren't based on objective evidence.
"The difficulty that we as infectious disease and public health people have is we don't put weight on data or on guidelines which are not evidence based," said Bowie.

'MEDICAL LIMBO'
Wilson, who contracted Lyme disease in 1991, also thinks freeing doctors to clinically treat the disease is "essential." Her treatment, which involved a lengthier course of antibiotics, lasted until 2013, when her doctor closed his practice amid questions about his methods.

Lugar said she's since been left to manage her symptoms, living in what she describes as a kind of "medical limbo."


From CBCnews: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/lyme-disease-medical-limbo-halifax-1.3757540



PARTICIPATE IN A STUDY TO EVALUATE LYME DISEASE TEST.
Participate in study to evaluate a new diagnostic test for Lyme disease.
Delaware Integrative Medicine is participating in a multicenter study to evaluate a Borrelia Diagnostic Test in subjects with early stage or late stage Lyme Disease.
For more criteria for participation visit: http://bit.ly/29ICJie

For more information, please call Delaware Integrative Medicine at 302.258.8853
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MYSTERY SOLVED!!
HOW LYME DISEASE BACTERIA SPREAD AROUND THE BODY

When you're bitten by a tick carrying the bacteria that cause Lyme disease, the microbes travel through your bloodstream and can eventually spread to the heart, joints and nervous system. But exactly how these bacteria move inside human blood vessels to spread throughout the body has remained largely a mystery, until now.

A new study sheds light on the way these bacteria latch onto the inside of blood vessel walls and move inside the vessels while fighting the forces of flowing blood.

The findings also suggest ways that researchers might target the interactions between the bacteria and blood vessels in order to slow down or prevent the disease's spread, the researchers said.


Investigating the interactions between bacteria and blood vessels "is really important for understanding how bacteria spread through the body via the cardiovascular system, and for developing methods to block bacterial dissemination," study co-author Tara Moriarty of the University of Toronto, said in a statement.

In the study, the researchers developed a so-called flow chamber that simulated the inside of human blood vessels. This system allowed the scientists to model and track how Lyme disease bacteria, called Borrelia burgdorferi, interact with the insides of blood vessels.

The researchers found that the way B. burgdorferi moves inside blood vessels can be likened to a child swinging on monkey bars: The bacteria form bonds with the blood vessel wall, and then move by transferring force from one bond to the next, but never completely detaching from the blood vessel wall. The bacteria slow down every time they form a new bond, and accelerate when they break a bond, which helps them transition to the next bond.

This movement pattern is remarkably similar to the way that human immune cells called leukocytes move inside people's blood vessels, the researchers said.

The researchers also found that a bacterial protein called BBK32 helps to stabilize and strengthen the bonds between the bacteria and the blood vessel wall.

Drugs that target BBK32 might help to prevent the spread of B. burgdorferi to joints, the heart and the nervous system, although future research is needed to test this, the researchers said. In addition, because B. burgdorferi's method of movement resembles that of leukocytes, existing drugs could be repurposed for Lyme disease, the researchers said. Those drugs treat certain autoimmune disorders by targeting leukocyte-blood vessel interactions.

The study is published in the Aug. 25 issue of the journal Cell Reports.

Original article on Live Science. By Rachael Rettner, Senior Writer | August 25, 2016 05:35pm ET



Dr. Henry Childers, a respected international clinician in the treatment of Lyme associated diseases, frequently presents new findings on treatment options at medical conferences. See his presentation to the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society on novel treatment of tick borne diseases.

For more information:
Delaware Integrative Medicine
Georgetown, De

302.258.8853
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CHRONIC LYME DISEASE A MAJOR HEALTHCARE CRISIS

Over 5 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with either chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia, but Horowitz noted that there is no test for either condition.

Another 2 million people have multiple sclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis, some of which Horowitz said could actually be Lyme disease-related.

While most doctors and medical groups dismiss the existence of chronic Lyme disease, a leading advocate says it’s a "major healthcare threat" to the United States.


CDC Grossly Underestimating Number Of Cases, Dr. Richard Horowitz Says
By Bill Martens, Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by a particular bacterium that can produce symptoms including fever, rash, arthritis, muscle and joint aches, fatigue, headaches and more. The disease is most prevalent in the northeastern and upper Midwest regions of the U.S., and most cases are treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics, but symptoms can linger for a brief period after treatment stops.

When symptoms stick around for three to six months, some physicians—who’ve dubbed themselves "Lyme-literate" doctors—classify the illness as chronic Lyme disease. But, often patients are diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis or are even admitted to psychiatric hospitals instead.

"Lyme is truly the great imitator," said Dr. Richard Horowitz, a certified board internist in Hyde Park, New York, and author of the forthcoming book, "How Can I Get Better? An Action Plan for Treating Resistant Lyme & Chronic Disease."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates there are 300,000 cases of Lyme disease each year in the U.S., although only about 30,000 are actually reported. It also concluded that in the last 20 years, Lyme disease cases increased by 320 percent.

But, many more people are infected with Lyme disease than the CDC estimates, according to Horowitz.

Read the Wisconsin Public Radio report:
www.wpr.org/chronic-lyme-disease-major-healthcare-crisis-doctor-says

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56% OF PATIENTS WITH LYME DISEASE TEST NEGATIVE

Participate in study to evaluate a new diagnostic test.

Delaware Integrative Medicine is participating in a multicenter study to evaluate a Borrelia Diagnostic Test in subjects with early stage or late stage Lyme Disease.

For more criteria for participation visit: http://bit.ly/29ICJie

For more information, please call
Delaware Integrative Medicine at 302.258.8853
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DR NEIL SPECTOR HAD 5 ER VISITS PLUS MULTIPLE DOCTORS BEFORE HE FOUND A LYME-LITERATE DOCTOR.

Here's his story:

Dana Parish Reprinted from the Huffington Post:

Lyme: The Infectious Disease Equivalent of Cancer, Says Top Duke Oncologist

Like so many of us, your Lyme was missed by multiple physicians. What were your symptoms?

I don’t recall a tick bite, but I first started having symptoms in 1993, mostly cardiac arrhythmias. I had unprovoked palpitations that lasted fifteen to twenty seconds. There was something ominous about the way they felt and came on, but they were never captured because by the time I got to the ER, they’d resolve. And because I had just moved to a new state and was extremely busy with my career, the easy diagnosis was that I was just stressed. Doctors were saying I looked and seemed fine, but I wasn’t.
I also had an early episode of brain fog that came on out of the blue. I gave a lecture at University of Miami School of Medicine for an hour, and afterward, I had zero recollection of anything I’d just said. It felt like I’d taken a hundred Benadryl. The feeling lasted for three weeks and then spontaneously lifted. Then in 1996, I developed arthritis in my wrist—it was really sudden and severe. I couldn’t hold utensils or do anything with my hands. I was put on doxycycline for an independent reason that had nothing to do with Lyme, and within twenty-four hours, the arthritis completely resolved. That’s when I felt I definitely had Lyme. At this time, my arrhythmias were getting worse and more complex. I was extremely fatigued, had burning in my heels, and night terrors.

The night terrors and burning in your heels sound like classic Bartonella.
They do. The weirder my symptoms became, the harder it was for my physicians to piece together. I didn’t have my first Lyme test until four years after my first arrhythmia.

Wow. And how many did you have until it came back positive?
I had three at a major lab that were considered negative. Then I found a great ILADS doctor from North Jersey and she ordered the fourth test and sent it to a lab called IGeneX. That test was positive.

How many doctors did you see before you found your Lyme-literate doctor?
I had about five ER visits with my heart issues. I saw a cardiologist and my internist, who is very caring and really tried to help. Then I went to a rheumatologist who ran a whole auto-immune panel—Lupus, Sjogren’s, you name it.

Did the Rheumatologist test you for Lyme?
No, he didn’t.




Wow, that’s mind-blowing.
Yeah, it is.

Do you feel that ruling out Lyme should be imperative before diagnosing a patient with an auto-immune disease like MS, Fibromyalgia, or Rheumatoid Arthritis?
Absolutely! And Alzheimer’s. Something has to trigger an autoimmune disease. It doesn’t matter if this occurs in one percent or seventy-eight percent of the patient population—to allow people to go down a path of progressive neurodegeneration when they could be treated is unconscionable.

You have famously compared cancer to Lyme. What are their similarities?
To me, Lyme is the infectious disease equivalent of cancer. We don’t talk about cancer as just one disease anymore, and we should stop talking about Lyme this way. There are so many strains and co-infections. When you’re bitten by a tick, you can get five or ten different infections at the same time.

I also find it ludicrous to call all tick-borne disease, Lyme Disease. In breast cancer, we don’t just say, “You have breast cancer,” because that simply doesn’t mean anything anymore. The language is important because it has a bearing on treatment.

With cancer, we know that administering one algorithmic form of treatment doesn’t work. You have to understand the wiring that drives those tumors—the nuances, the mutations—and target them specifically. I think we need to start thinking this way about Lyme.

Read More:

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HAVE YOU OR A LOVED ONE
BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH LYME DISEASE?

Participate in study to evaluate a new diagnostic test.
Delaware Integrative Medicine is participating in a multicenter study to evaluate a Borrelia Diagnostic Test in subjects with early stage or late stage Lyme Disease.

Subjects will be men and women who are at least 18 years of age who have been potentially exposed to ticks in a Lyme endemic area with signs, symptoms and clinical history consistent with early or late Lyme disease.

For more criteria for participation visit: http://bit.ly/29ICJie
For more information, please call Delaware Integrative Medicine at 302.258.8853

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WHY IS THE CDC SO QUIET ABOUT LYME DISEASE?

Lyme Disease is an epidemic.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported over 300,000 new cases contracted by American people every year, revised from an estimated 30,000 in 2013.

So why is there such a great resistance from medical authorities—particularly the CDC and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)—to acknowledge abundant current scientific evidence that Lyme symptoms persist and worsen following their recommended maximum 28 day treatment with antibiotics?

THE CDC IS NOTORIOUSLY QUIET ABOUT LYME DISEASE.

Paul Mead, chief of epidemiology and surveillance activity of the Bacterial Diseases Branch of CDC, confirmed that the Center continues to endorse the two-tiered ELISA and Western blot blood diagnostics despite proven result of false negative readings for at least half of patients who are tested. Mead, on behalf of CDC, maintains that the two-tiered test is “reliable” in later stages of Lyme.

However, this is not the case for many patients. Regardless of the CDC's endorsement of their tests laws in Virginia and Maryland now require that doctors inform patients about the failings of these tests!!

(It is worth noting that the average cost to secure FDA approval of a new medical device is $24 million, which can present delays and sometimes even indefinitely prohibit creators of better and more accurate devices from securing FDA approval.)


WANT MORE INFO?
New York’s FOX 5 news special report, “Lyme and Reason” delves into issues surrounding Lyme disease including the fallibility of diagnostic blood tests, common misdiagnoses, and potentially fatal heart complications.

Read David Michael Conner's article on The Huffington Post

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HEALTHY OR DISEASED VEINS?

SCHEDULE A FREE CONSULTATION

The Delaware Vein Center offers the most advanced treatment options for varicose and spider veins.

Do you have vein disease?

The Delaware Vein Center offers the most advanced treatment options for varicose and spider veins.

Varicose veins can cause pain and discomfort in the legs, skin discoloration and visible bulged veins, but with the proper treatment, your symptoms can be greatly reduced.

Our physician, Dr. Henry Childers, works with you to develops a customized treatment plan designed to help you maintain an active lifestyle and lower your risk of cardiovascular complications. We offer the latest minimally invasive treatment options in a convenient outpatient setting, including:

• A range of advanced, noninvasive test options to accurately diagnose PAD
• Minimally invasive vein removal
• Injection therapy


SCHEDULE A FREE CONSULTATION


THE DELAWARE VEIN CENTER

20930 DuPont Blvd. Suite 202 Georgetown, DE

Phone: (305) 258-8853
Email: dimc.childers@gmail.com
thedelawareveincenter.com
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