Profile

Cover photo
Deborah Hughes
1,898 followers|811,855 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
I have an article in the February edition of Landscape Photography Magazine discussing the topic of whether photography is considered art. A small subscription fee is required to read the full article.

https://landscapephotographymagazine.com/2016/is-photography-art/
If art’s purpose is to evoke an emotional response, then why shouldn’t photography be considered as art? Deborah Hughes discusses this sensitive subject
6
Rob Patterson's profile photoSandra Nesbit's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photoMark Wade's profile photo
4 comments
 
Well written Deborah. I am grateful for the efforts of Stieglitz and other pioneers...bringing some acceptance of photography as an art. But as your article addresses...the print.."is like the birth of a child rather than a trophy commodity" sums up the much of what we see. Most certainly, if we buy a camera online, or become a part of a photography group...we are deluged with "how to" ads and advice from every corner of the WWW. And we end up looking for the easiest way to make stuff like everyone else. Not a good start for any newborn.
In reality, (for me) if my work does not convey that quiet stillness invoked by a shared-world view...I have failed. Photography invites us to reconnect with that awesome relationship. To be "unafraid to be whoever and see whatever"...and discover the wealth of a story as simple and elegant as "pearl strings of coyote poop".
That eye toward simple, overlooked grandeur is evidenced in your work. Sometimes the best landscape is right under our feet.
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
Searching for a book online this morning, I came across a new genre of adult coloring books sold as aids to contemplation. I can understand the draw to let the mind drift through use of scribbled color, line, and composition having done a bit of pen and ink art in the past. Photography, as I practice it, has replaced my doodling to become a more whole body/mind artistic experience. Most of my images come from hikes into canyons or along trails where I anticipate shadows and bounced light from steep canyon walls, where my photographic yoga/dance positions align with nature's palette, where coloring outside the bounds of the expected I'm drawn back into my own humanity.
12
1
Deborah Hughes's profile photo
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
WINTER SUNSET
10
1
Francesco Del Santo's profile photoMarkku Toivari's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photo
11 comments
 
+Deborah Hughes my pleasure!
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
LEAF DANCE. Art. Art is my arc for 2016. Not necessarily from a production standpoint - that is so 2015, but more towards expanding artistic seeing and sensibilities into all aspects of my everyday life. Seeing the threads of my own personal actions sewn into the fabric of world crisis, sensing the bounds of my own blindness and the thaw of my own chill of spirit, I choose art. I embrace all of its mistaken identities, its decomposition, its fall-on-your-ass slips, its icy revelations, its bi-polar glee and funk, its seasonal weatherings. All of it.

2016, let's dance!
18
1
Markku Toivari's profile photoMargrit Schwarz's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Margrit Schwarz Hope your 2016 is fully of fun and photographic surprises!
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
SHIVER AT SUNRISE. Despite the deep freeze and deep snow, I am forever grateful for the daily dose of sunshine and my husband's faithful stoke of the wood stove.
11
1
Markku Toivari's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Markku Toivari Thank you!
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
Somewhere along the twisty, gut wrench of this last year, either Google made some changes to how I see posts or I inadvertently clicked some setting to where I only viewed a few posts.  I think I finally figured out the problem and now I can see your posts.  I apologize for my inadvertent inattention, but look forward to seeing all of your wonderful photos and shares in the new year.
13
Randi Slaughter's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Randi Slaughter Thanks!
Add a comment...
Have her in circles
1,898 people
Venture Icon Media's profile photo
Ferris Lane's profile photo
Dean Emerick's profile photo
Geoffrey Dodd's profile photo
Michael Tavalin, Nature Photographer's profile photo
Jenifer Jeny's profile photo
Ilian Kutkurov's profile photo
Michela Griffith Photography's profile photo
Peter Gonera's profile photo

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
GET MY DRIFT?      I only made it outside yesterday to empty the compost and haul wood. The wind was busy rearranging the new snow both burying and revealing last year's sunflower stalks. I managed a few shots out the back window.
11
1
Angela King-Jones's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Angela King-Jones Thank you!
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
ICE SKATING LESSONS.   The most intricate and interesting ice sculptures here in the desert are formed by cold temps solidifying pooled and slow-moving water, enhanced by the water's residency in a deep ravine, alternated with an afternoon thaw occasioned by the bounced light off a canyon wall which liquefies the top layer. This slick slush dances with trapped leaves and wind-blown sand, rearranging itself at sundown.
I find my own creative process mimics this seasonal and daily movement, yet I resist. I want to irrigate when the day stays sub-zero and the ice remains set. Impatient, I brew up an overwhelming desire to break through its crust, to smash it to smithereens into compliance. When the day dawns warm and sunny, the ice and its beauty disappears and I feel cheated with a keen sense of loss.
Today, the forecast is above freezing. My watered-down, winter voice whispers Move.
20
1
Markku Toivari's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photo
10 comments
 
+Susan Chavez It all changes form each day.  Ice is the ultimate lesson in fading beauty.
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
WINTER IN INDIAN CREEK.     I spent New Year's Day in Canyonlands along Indian Creek.  I love how the late afternoon light plays on the bare-branched cottonwoods against the background blues of shadowed snow.  

I want to thank all of you have recently added me to their circles as well as those who have offered their thoughts and support over the years.  I'm going to be concentrating on some writing projects the next few months and will be less active on social media.  My goal is to post at least weekly and respond to comments and messages whenever I can.  
11
Connie hilton's profile photoMarkku Toivari's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Markku Toivari Thank you!
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
LIGHT ON ICE. I have been photographing ice since I first moved to Moab in 1996. Closeted in an old suitcase are stacks of snapshots from that time and intervening eras. When I purchased my first DSLR, I rushed around trying to capture higher quality images of the ice formations that lived in the suitcase without much success. Weather patterns, life changes, and an ever increasing numbers of visitors crunching through my favorite spots melted my enchantment.
Each winter since has been a reminder that the only thing that never changes is change and that expectations can breed disappointment. I still hunt for ice. I walk past the smashed canvases, decline the steep inclines, find times and places unpopulated by crowds.
And sometimes when I'm shivering and ready to turn around, I find a glass of light on ice and drink up!
9
1
Markku Toivari's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Markku Toivari Happy new year to you, too!
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
13
1
Christina Coloradoan's profile photo
Add a comment...

Deborah Hughes

Shared publicly  - 
 
FROZEN WITH DOUBT

In a recent conversation with a friend about our journey through the photographic art world and sharing on social media, we commiserated about the difficulties of finding quality information about techniques beyond googled, bullet-point lists and workshops that offered little more than a meet up with the master.

Got me thinking:

For centuries, art education was a master/student apprenticeship where a student would assist with creating the master's work. The master guided the student's progress for years and sometimes lifetimes before exposing the student's creations to the world. More recently, workshops, schools, and universities spin out artists where teaching rather than art making become necessary to support one's self, family, and student debt. Nowadays, everyone's an artist with the right app and a FB page. The Master is social media and the accumulation of like clicks.

I'm not making any value judgments here. Just want to point out that the journey of becoming an artist, what is common throughout the eons of time, is time. The set in stone, stone methodologies and economics of yesteryear only allowed a few individuals the time, the deep, mind-expanding time to develop the soul of an artist.
Fast-forward, faster and faster and you come upon the look in the mirror, the selfie of the overwhelming, mind-numbing, soul and time stealing, yet wonderfully democratizing access to learning, creating, and sharing of artistic vision. We post our art and hope that someone in the world will see the beauty of our own becoming.

We've become accustomed to our desires and now the artistic process to be instantaneously satisfied. We want the app, the technique, the recipe, and expect results to be on par with what we see some "master's" website. We become frozen with doubt, jealousy, and competition in our unwillingness to both take the time for ourselves and to give it others.

In this time, this time of YOUR life, find the time to learn, to discover, to experiment, to share. We are all in different places and at different times on our journey to becoming. Give it time.
23
2
Francesco Del Santo's profile photoSam Stapleton's profile photoDeborah Hughes's profile photoChristine Amat photographe bordeaux's profile photo
5 comments
 
Wonderful!
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
Fine Art Landscape, Nature and Abstract Photographer working in Southern Utah, the Colorado Plateau and Beyond.
Introduction
The camera is an appendage through which I explore, experience and preserve the stark allure of desert environs and wherever else my hiking boots or sandals can trek. I aim to create poem prints of extraordinary scenes or features found in the landscape using natural light and color, at times incorporating abstract compositions or alternative capture techniques such as Intentional Camera Movement or the Zoom Effect.

The predominance of photography as my primary artistic expression has had an off-the-trail evolution beginning with visits to Southeast Utah in the early 80's.  I was drawn back to the desert again and again for business, river trips and solo hiking expeditions.  After my three sons left home, I decided to move my CPA business to Moab, Utah where I spent the first two years living in a small trailer as a camp host on the Colorado River, carrying in my own water and reading by solar-powered light.  I wrote volumes of poetry during that time, but as my accounting business grew, I moved into town.

Besides its reputation for motor vehicle recreation, Moab has an incredible community of writers, artists, and other creative types.  In 2001, I was involved with Moab Poets and Writers in creating VOLUNTARY EXILE, a writer's workshop featuring Terry Tempest Williams and Sam Hamill.

I discovered that hiking and camping, particularly solo ventures, fed my creative process and writing, but as my business grew time for such activities diminished.  I started carrying a small point and shoot to document the landscapes, colors, and natural objects that caught my eye when I did get out, reviewing them at home to recreate the felt sense which fed my poetry.  After a while, I started feeling a sense of loss if I inadvertently left the camera home or in the vehicle.

I purchased a Panasonic DMC-FZ35 which captured raw shots and I began to play around more with light and composition beyond simple documentation.  I was delighted by the results, though initially hit-and-miss, in the photo's ability to provide a more immediate and genuine re-creation of my emotional experience at time of capture.  I found myself behind the camera more and the holding the pen less.

At first, I found this disturbing.  My poetry eye was morphing into something I wasn't sure I felt comfortable with as it changed the way I saw and experienced the places that had moved and molded me creatively.  I started leaving the camera home intentionally.  Then I missed it.  I had become attached to its unique points of view and how it opened up new worlds beyond what's normally seen.

Just over a year ago, I began sharing those views with family and friends and sold some prints locally and beyond and bought a DSLR to expand my vision.  My eye has mutated once again to incorporate the settings, the lenses, the filters and now I frame almost everything in my life photographically.

Colors bounce, patterns pop, lines dance and draw me into the non-human, yet expand my humanity beyond its fleshy bounds.  This is what I wish to share.


Bragging rights
Great Grandmother
Work
Occupation
www.deborahhughes.zenfolio.com
Contact Information
Work
Email