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Deborah Hughes
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Deborah Hughes

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What camera bags are really made for...
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Deborah Hughes

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SPRING POND. For me, Photographic Impressionism explores the playful, poetic possibilities of light stirred up with my emotional response to color, line, and pattern, yet can easily become just another belt-notched technique if I fail to explore the metaphors outside the forest.
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Deborah Hughes

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Been deep down in the mine of writing. Heading out for a day tour of some favorite places to clean the cobwebs.
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+Francesco Del Santo Thank you!  Have a great day!
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No it's not your birthday, Christmas is long past, and it's not yet another Hallmark holiday, but I picked today out of all those before us dawning to tell you how many really incredible people (yourself included) there are in my life! Happy Just Another Day!
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+Neeta Sardana Thanks!
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Searching for a book online this morning, I came across a new genre of adult coloring books sold as aids to contemplation. I can understand the draw to let the mind drift through use of scribbled color, line, and composition having done a bit of pen and ink art in the past. Photography, as I practice it, has replaced my doodling to become a more whole body/mind artistic experience. Most of my images come from hikes into canyons or along trails where I anticipate shadows and bounced light from steep canyon walls, where my photographic yoga/dance positions align with nature's palette, where coloring outside the bounds of the expected I'm drawn back into my own humanity.
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+Francesco Del Santo You have a great day, too!
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WINTER SUNSET
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+FotoAgnieszka Ambro Thank you!
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Have her in circles
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Deborah Hughes

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ON THE ROAD AGAIN. I often use car trips to visit my sons as opportunities to photograph environments other than my usual desert haunts. It's easy to get caught up in the stunning beauty of my own back yard here in red rock country, but I have come to love the wide open grasslands and rolling hills of northern Colorado and eastern Wyoming. Through the lens of my camera, I have learned to see subtle scenes such as this roadside wetland created by runoff from distant dry farms, cattle ranches, the road itself, as well as the throbbing pipeline pumping station that served as a back beat to the honking geese and tittering songbirds.
I travel, I eat, I heat my home, I photograph, I think - therefore I am - both the beauty and the beast.
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I'm excited to announce that I've been invited to present at the Greater Yellowstone Photography Symposium in May 2017! I will also be teaching a class in the Art of Impressionistic and Abstract Photography. Check it out at http://www.perfectlightstore.com/gyps/#.Vzh4SZErJhE. Please specify you would like to sign up for both my class and presentation separately.
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More and more, I find my photography moving - moving away from the paralyzed shutter of sharpness, moving away from the gear-trapped trapeze, and moving back into the quiet poetry of walking through and looking at and learning the backyard of my desert, my mountains, my rivers.
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Me too. It's greater.
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Deborah Hughes

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I have an article in the February edition of Landscape Photography Magazine discussing the topic of whether photography is considered art. A small subscription fee is required to read the full article.

https://landscapephotographymagazine.com/2016/is-photography-art/
If art’s purpose is to evoke an emotional response, then why shouldn’t photography be considered as art? Deborah Hughes discusses this sensitive subject
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Well written Deborah. I am grateful for the efforts of Stieglitz and other pioneers...bringing some acceptance of photography as an art. But as your article addresses...the print.."is like the birth of a child rather than a trophy commodity" sums up the much of what we see. Most certainly, if we buy a camera online, or become a part of a photography group...we are deluged with "how to" ads and advice from every corner of the WWW. And we end up looking for the easiest way to make stuff like everyone else. Not a good start for any newborn.
In reality, (for me) if my work does not convey that quiet stillness invoked by a shared-world view...I have failed. Photography invites us to reconnect with that awesome relationship. To be "unafraid to be whoever and see whatever"...and discover the wealth of a story as simple and elegant as "pearl strings of coyote poop".
That eye toward simple, overlooked grandeur is evidenced in your work. Sometimes the best landscape is right under our feet.
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GET MY DRIFT?      I only made it outside yesterday to empty the compost and haul wood. The wind was busy rearranging the new snow both burying and revealing last year's sunflower stalks. I managed a few shots out the back window.
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+Angela King-Jones Thank you!
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ICE SKATING LESSONS.   The most intricate and interesting ice sculptures here in the desert are formed by cold temps solidifying pooled and slow-moving water, enhanced by the water's residency in a deep ravine, alternated with an afternoon thaw occasioned by the bounced light off a canyon wall which liquefies the top layer. This slick slush dances with trapped leaves and wind-blown sand, rearranging itself at sundown.
I find my own creative process mimics this seasonal and daily movement, yet I resist. I want to irrigate when the day stays sub-zero and the ice remains set. Impatient, I brew up an overwhelming desire to break through its crust, to smash it to smithereens into compliance. When the day dawns warm and sunny, the ice and its beauty disappears and I feel cheated with a keen sense of loss.
Today, the forecast is above freezing. My watered-down, winter voice whispers Move.
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+Susan Chavez It all changes form each day.  Ice is the ultimate lesson in fading beauty.
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Fine Art Landscape, Nature and Abstract Photographer working in Southern Utah, the Colorado Plateau and Beyond.
Introduction
The camera is an appendage through which I explore, experience and preserve the stark allure of desert environs and wherever else my hiking boots or sandals can trek. I aim to create poem prints of extraordinary scenes or features found in the landscape using natural light and color, at times incorporating abstract compositions or alternative capture techniques such as Intentional Camera Movement or the Zoom Effect.

The predominance of photography as my primary artistic expression has had an off-the-trail evolution beginning with visits to Southeast Utah in the early 80's.  I was drawn back to the desert again and again for business, river trips and solo hiking expeditions.  After my three sons left home, I decided to move my CPA business to Moab, Utah where I spent the first two years living in a small trailer as a camp host on the Colorado River, carrying in my own water and reading by solar-powered light.  I wrote volumes of poetry during that time, but as my accounting business grew, I moved into town.

Besides its reputation for motor vehicle recreation, Moab has an incredible community of writers, artists, and other creative types.  In 2001, I was involved with Moab Poets and Writers in creating VOLUNTARY EXILE, a writer's workshop featuring Terry Tempest Williams and Sam Hamill.

I discovered that hiking and camping, particularly solo ventures, fed my creative process and writing, but as my business grew time for such activities diminished.  I started carrying a small point and shoot to document the landscapes, colors, and natural objects that caught my eye when I did get out, reviewing them at home to recreate the felt sense which fed my poetry.  After a while, I started feeling a sense of loss if I inadvertently left the camera home or in the vehicle.

I purchased a Panasonic DMC-FZ35 which captured raw shots and I began to play around more with light and composition beyond simple documentation.  I was delighted by the results, though initially hit-and-miss, in the photo's ability to provide a more immediate and genuine re-creation of my emotional experience at time of capture.  I found myself behind the camera more and the holding the pen less.

At first, I found this disturbing.  My poetry eye was morphing into something I wasn't sure I felt comfortable with as it changed the way I saw and experienced the places that had moved and molded me creatively.  I started leaving the camera home intentionally.  Then I missed it.  I had become attached to its unique points of view and how it opened up new worlds beyond what's normally seen.

Just over a year ago, I began sharing those views with family and friends and sold some prints locally and beyond and bought a DSLR to expand my vision.  My eye has mutated once again to incorporate the settings, the lenses, the filters and now I frame almost everything in my life photographically.

Colors bounce, patterns pop, lines dance and draw me into the non-human, yet expand my humanity beyond its fleshy bounds.  This is what I wish to share.


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