Profile

Cover photo
Dean Calahan
Works at Smithsonian Institution
Attended Johns Hopkins: Ph.D. Biology
Lives in Chesapeake Bay Area
7,526 followers|2,348,744 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotos

Stream

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
H/T to +Edward Osenbaugh 

The fuel performance alone would make it worth checking out, even if it sucked as much as hydrazine for handling. However, Hydroxylammonium nitrate is a green propellant, meaning shirtsleeves rather than soybeans. It is an ionic liquid monopropellant.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Propellant_Infusion_Mission
https://www.rocket.com/files/aerojet/documents/CubeSat/GPIM%20AF-M315E%20Propulsion%20System.pdf
18
1
J. Steven York's profile photo
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
H/T to +John Verdon. Another reward for my own sloth: I've had similar artistic thoughts myself, but now don't need to pursue this particular line!
 
Italian artist Giuseppe Penone removes the growth rings on a tree to reveal the tree at a younger age.
#trees +Jack Bringloe 
4 comments on original post
11
Dean Calahan's profile photo
 
When I say "pursue this particular line", I mean "feel guilty for not pursuing this particular line".
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Somewhere in my house must be my copy of the original Integrated Space Plan that was part of the swag from the L5 Society conference held in Seattle decades ago. Here are both a new version, which you've likely already seen, and a pointer (H/T to +Winchell Chung) that could help you encode your own version.

http://www.wired.com/2015/08/wildly-detailed-100-year-plan-getting-humans-mars/

http://makezine.com/2013/07/06/the-rockwell-integrated-space-plan-vector-redux-version/
40
2
Ricardo Salinas's profile photoΓεώργιος Παναγιώτου's profile photoSentgil kumar's profile photo
 
Cool Awesome work
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nice shot of the recent cargo ship now berthed to the ISS, launch by Japan's space agency.
 
Japan's HTV-5 Cargo Ship: View 1 | International Space Station
The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Kounotori 5 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV-5) is seen during final approach towards the International Space Station. The unpiloted cargo craft, named "Kounotori," which is Japanese for "white stork," is loaded with more than four-and-a-half tons of research and supplies, including water, spare parts and experiment hardware

Credit: NASA/JSC, Japanese Astronaut Kimiya Yui 
Date: August 24, 2015 

+JAXA | 宇宙航空研究開発機構 
+NASA Johnson Space Center 

#NASA #Space #ISS #HTV5 #Cargo #Kounotori #Robotics #STEM #Education #Spacecraft #Science #Technology #Engineering
#Astronauts #KimiyaYui #KjellLindgren #JAXA #Tanegashima
#Japan #日本 #JSC #Expedition44
16 comments on original post
78
8
Rosen Markov's profile photoSeaO'Bain “LokiGen” Mahoney's profile photoGleb Batenko's profile photowa DO's profile photo
5 comments
 
There be whisky in that thar vessel. Not for the crew to drink, but as a scientific experiment from Santori.
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
A fascinating perspective.

Note: I am all for the Russians disconnecting their modules from ISS when it's time to decommission it, and completing a full station on their own, with plenty of labs like this. Various entities could then replace the former Russian segment with Bigelow modules.

First thing I would do once the Russians are on their own: burn propellant to lower the damned inclination! Then launch mass quantities to the new location.
 
Multipurpose Laboratory Module, MLM

On November 3, 2006, RKK Energia and the Russian space agency, Roskosmos, signed a contract calling for the development of the Multipurpose Laboratory Module, MLM. At the time, work on the module was expected to start in 2007, and its launch was targeted for 2009.

In the new configuration, the MLM module would accommodate service systems for the Russian segment of the ISS and scientific payloads. The European-built ERA manipulator and the DMS-R multifunction computer would also be installed onboard. A special automated airlock for moving payloads from the interior of the station to the vacuum of space would be installed on the lower section of MLM.

To be delivered into space by the Proton rocket, the module would have an initial mass of 20,700 kilograms and provide 70 cubic meters of pressurized volume. Around eight cubic meters would be available for cargo storage and the same volume would be left for the installation of the scientific payloads. The module would sport a total of 12 workstations for various instruments and experiments. Special incubators and vibration-protected platforms for sensitive material-science research would be available.

Prior to the MLM launch, the Docking Compartment-1, which had occupied the nadir (Earth-facing) docking port of the Zvezda service module, was to be discarded along with a departing Progress cargo ship. It would then be directed to the Earth atmosphere to burn up. The MLM would then use its own engines to rendezvous with the station and dock to the freed nadir port on Zvezda.

Around a year or two after the MLM arrival to the station, a 4,000-kilogram ball-shaped Node module would be docked to the outer end of the MLM.

Development

By the beginning of 2008, the launch date of the MLM slipped from 2009 to 2011. Until May 2009, the MLM was promised to take off in December 2011. During a May 29 press-conference at the mission control in Korolev, Aleksei Krasnov, the head of manned space flight at Roskosmos said that launch was expected in the first quarter of 2012. However in the October 2009 NASA schedule, the mission was still marked for launch in December 2011.

In August 2011, the Director General of GKNPTs Khrunichev, Vladimir Nesterov, said that a prototype of the MLM module designed for electrical tests would be delivered to RKK Energia before the end of the month, despite technical issues associated with changes in the module's design documentation. (503) Around the same time, industry sources said that an integrated prototype of the MLM module had already been delivered to RKK Energia and was in process of being hooked up to the integrated prototype of the Russian segment.

By the fall of 2011, the launch of the module was postponed from December 2012 to June 2013, as the earliest. By 2012, the launch slipped further to 2014.

Work in 2012-2014

By the end of August 2012, GKNPTs Khrunichev completed the installation of the ERA robotic arm and onboard cable lines on the MLM module. The thermal control, hydraulics and pneumatic systems had been tested and solar panels had been installed, the company announced on September 3.

On September 21, GKNPTs Khrunichev completed assembly of the payload section for the MLM mission, including the module itself, its protective fairing and an adapter ring designed to serve as an interface between the spacecraft and the Proton launch vehicle. The operation would test all mechanical interfaces, check electrical systems and pneumatic pushers, the company announced. This work would be followed by the weighing of the module and vacuum tests.

A fully assembled flight version of the module would then be shipped to RKK Energia for further electrical tests, GKNPTs Khrunichev said. As of the beginning of September, the transfer of the spacecraft to RKK Energia was promised to take place in October, or two months behind a previous schedule, however it had to be delayed even further.

A critical transfer from the Moscow's district of Fili to Korolev started on the night from December 6 to December 7, 2012. From December 7 to December 14, a joint team of specialists from GKNPTs Khrunichev and RKK Energia unloaded the module from the railway car and installed it at the processing site in the main hall of the RKK Energia's Checkout and Testing Building, KIS, the company announced. According to RKK Energia, the upcoming work included autonomous and integrated tests of the module, including joint trials with ground equivalents of other Russian ISS modules as well as Progress and Soyuz transport ships. The MLM module was christened Nauka a Russian word for "science."

According to a schedule approved by RKK Energia leadership on October 24, 2012, the launch of the MLM Nauka module was scheduled for Dec. 11, 2013, enabling a docking of the spacecraft to the Zvezda Service Module on the Russian segment of the station nine days later. However according to industry sources at the time, MLM was not likely to lift off before 2014.

2013: MLM module faces lengthy delays

During 2013, the launch of the MLM module was re-scheduled to April and then to June 2014. In the meantime, tests of the MLM at RKK Energia revealed a leaking fueling valve in the propulsion system of the spacecraft. The damage was serious enough to require a complex procedure of cutting away the valve and welding in a new one. Before committing to the repairs, engineers had to practice it on a full-scale prototype of the MLM module known in Russian as Kompleksny Stend, KS.

Further inspections of MLM at RKK Energia apparently found contamination inside the propulsion system, which would require a lengthy cleaning. According to some reports, it would take up to 10 months to resolve all the issues with the spacecraft.

As a result, it was decided to return the MLM back to GKNPTs Khrunichev for repairs. On Oct. 22, 2013, the Interfax news agency reported that all the repairs at GKNPTs Khrunichev would take a year and a half to complete. According to a poster on the online forum of the Novosti Kosmonavtiki magazine, latest plans called for the launch of the MLM module in September 2015. The head of RKK Energia Vitaly Lopota told the RIA Novosti news agency that no decision for the return of the module back to GKNPTs Khrunichev had been made yet. At the same time, Lopota admitted that he had not certified the spacecraft for launch.

To make matters worse, the European Space Agency, ESA, responsible for the ERA mechanical arm onboard the MLM module reportedly had enough with all the delays and resulting cost overruns. ESA reportedly refused funding for the program beginning from 2014 onwards. As a result, the Russian government would likely have to pick up the tab for all further cost increases in the project.

By the end of 2013, NASA documents indicated that the MLM module would not fly before November 2015.

2014: From bad to worse

On Jan. 10, 2014, the head of RKK Energia Vitaly Lopota told the official ITAR-TASS news agency that the MLM module had been returned to GKNPTs Khrunichev on Dec. 31, 2013. Lopota promised that the repair schedule for the spacecraft would be issued by the end of the month. However only in April, Lopota was able to estimate that fixing all the damage to the crippled module would take no less than nine months, while its exact processing schedule would not be set until the end of the month. By that time, the launch of the MLM in 2015 was practically ruled out. To save at least some time, plans were made to ship the MLM from GKNPTs Khrunichev directly to the launch site, letting RKK Energia to conduct all final tests of the spacecraft in Baikonur, instead of its testing facility in Korolev, near Moscow.

On April 26, a poster on the web forum of the Novosti Kosmonavtiki magazine reported that the new development schedule had been approved, targeting February 2017 for the launch of the module. The tanks of the spacecraft were found to be unaffected by the contamination, however almost all propellant lines running on the exterior of the module would have to be replaced. Moreover, the module's engines had already exceeded their warranty and had to be replaced as well. The manufacturing of the new propulsion systems would take up to eight months, the poster said.

With its central position in the architecture of the Russian segment, the MLM's troubles also stall the launch of all subsequent Russian components of the station, including the Node Module, UM, (already under construction) and the NEM laboratory and power supply module, whose full-scale development started in 2012.

Given such a prolonged delay, combined with worsening political relations between Russia and its partners in the ISS project, the questions were raised whether the MLM module and the successive components of the Russian segment could be grounded until the assembly of the new all-Russian station in the post-ISS era. Under such a scenario, the troubled spacecraft could play a role of an early hub for the future orbital outpost. These speculations were reinforced by a statement of the Russian Vice-Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin in 2014 that Russia would pull out from the ISS project in 2020.

2015: Some certainty

In November 2014, officials cited the launch of the MLM module to the ISS in the first quarter of 2017, however the station's flight manifest surfaced in April 2015 indicated the launch in the middle of 2017. Fortunately, by that time, the Russian space program reacquired some focus after several months of uncertainty.

Read (and see) much more about this and many other space developments in Russia
in a richly illustrated, large-format glossy edition:

Book


View original post
41
2
Dean Calahan's profile photoKevin Spencer's profile photoSutidjo “Kamikaze” Baskoro's profile photowa DO's profile photo
3 comments
 
Thankfully, they've re-signed to 2024, the expected phase-out of ISS.
Add a comment...
In their circles
2,011 people
Have them in circles
7,526 people
Thiago Viana Camata's profile photo
Antariksh Tiwary's profile photo
Eric Tufts's profile photo
shogun x's profile photo
Patricia Bowen's profile photo
Chris Vancil's profile photo
Alan Bond's profile photo
Richard Allaway's profile photo
Consumer Debt Counselors's profile photo

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm going to go out on a limb here and guess that you've never heard of the anammoxome, nor of ladderanes. It turns out that some bacteria do have internal membrane-bound organelles, and in this one, the anammoxome (for anaerobic ammonia oxidation) membrane is composed of a striking lipid with a ladderane component. Presumably the ladderane portion forms a really tight vesicle to contain the highly toxic hydrazine intermediate in the enzymatically orchestrated net reaction NH4+ + NO2- --> N2 + 2H2O.
3
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
I know several people who will love this video.
 
slow motion contact explosive
Cave Johnson here. The folks in the lab have a new mosquito repellent
6 comments on original post
5
1
Dean Calahan's profile photoJohn Robson's profile photo
 
Did I say "love", I meant: I know several people who have lived this video.
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
'for “$10 and other good and valuable consideration,”'

Texas space complex grows.
 
SpaceX rocket site grows
Construction set to begin this fall at Boca Chica beach.
BOCA CHICA — Land purchases and preparations continue in developing the world’s first commercial and vertical rocket launch site here.
5 comments on original post
39
2
Ricardo Salinas's profile photothomas dobias's profile photoGarry Six's profile photoSURESH NATARAJA's profile photo
2 comments
 
             Space  Travel
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
There's hardly any fuel left, so they have to find a distant object that a few puffs of the rocket, years in advance, can steer them to. If we're very lucky, there will be a third object.
 
Path of NASA's New Horizons spacecraft toward its next potential target, the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) 2014 MU69, nicknamed “PT1” (for “Potential Target 1”) by the New Horizons team. NASA must approve any New Horizons extended mission to explore a KBO. Image credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI/Alex Parker.
View original post
5
Paul Carr's profile photoDean Calahan's profile photo
2 comments
 
Well, then, if we're very, very lucky maybe we'll get a fourth object!
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
53
7
george oloo's profile photosnakeappletree white-lightning-gate's profile photowa DO's profile photoDr “TOTAL SAVAGE” JP's profile photo
 
I remember those old days, of stand up arcade games :)
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
No doubt you've already seen much of the new Ceres imagery.

Lonely Mountain. Maybe the flanks of it are some kind of easily erodible ice, covered in a cap of material that settled after various impacts elsewhere. Sublimation erodes it inwards, and boulders at the edge get undercut, then slide or roll straight down, creating the linear features.
2
Add a comment...

Dean Calahan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hey, I hadn't looked as SOFCs for a while. In "traditional" fuel cells, hydrogen is ionized and crosses a membrane where the chemical energy from it combining with oxygen energizes the electron. In a SOFC, oxygen is ionized and crosses the membrane, so theoretically you can burn any fuel, not just hydrogen.

Because the membrane for an SOFC is brittle cubic zirconia, development has been slow.

The idea is that it is compact and has a very high efficiency, better than a heat engine, for generating electricity. It's useful, conceptually, for many terrestrial, as well as space development, applications.
 
Solid oxide fuel cell for Mar ISRU(living off the land)
Big anechoic chamber
And watching a thermal runaway in the battery lab.
Day two of playing your guide for the new engineering employees.
I will upload the pyro firing later.
View original post
8
Add a comment...
Dean's Collections
People
In their circles
2,011 people
Have them in circles
7,526 people
Thiago Viana Camata's profile photo
Antariksh Tiwary's profile photo
Eric Tufts's profile photo
shogun x's profile photo
Patricia Bowen's profile photo
Chris Vancil's profile photo
Alan Bond's profile photo
Richard Allaway's profile photo
Consumer Debt Counselors's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Algae farmer
Skills
Cell & molecular biology, genetics, bioinformatics, software engineering, making things happen
Employment
  • Smithsonian Institution
    Researcher/Fellow, 2013 - present
  • Johns Hopkins
    Ph.D. Biology, 2004 - 2011
  • Towson University
    B.S. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Bioinformatics, 2002 - 2004
  • Microsoft
    SDE/T, 1993 - 2000
  • Aldus
    Test lead, 1987 - 1992
  • Timeline
    Mainframe operator, 1983 - 1986
  • University of Washington
    Chemistry, 1981 - 1985
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Chesapeake Bay Area
Previously
Puget Sound Region - Mid-Willamette Valley
Story
Tagline
Genes, Cells, Informatics, …Algae!
Introduction
Willamette brewed, Puget aged, Chesapeake tapped.

I love reading what you post directly. However, I don't want to see what you've +1'd. Also, please try using Collections for your food and cat pictures.

Have a nice day!
Bragging rights
Walked around Mount Rainier in nine days. Hiked the entire Olympic National Park coast. Did 4-season camping for many years.
Education
  • Johns Hopkins: Ph.D. Biology
  • Towson University: B.S. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, & Bioinformatics
Links