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Dean Ballweg
Works at National Conference of Bar Examiners
Attended University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Lived in Cambridge, WI
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Dean Ballweg

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Finally...an 80's remake that I'm looking forward to!
John Badham's cautionary, tricked-out helicopter action flick gets a drone-ified redo.
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Carlton Dodd's profile photoBryan Young's profile photo
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What? You weren't all hyped for the remake of "Berry Gordy's 'The Last Dragon'"? With Samuel L. Jackson cast as Sho'Nuff?
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Dean Ballweg

Products (no ads, please)  - 
 
About a month and a half ago I ordered one of +Alien Gear Holsters  Cloak Tuck 2.0 holsters for my new Steyr M357 (4” barrel and a full length, double stack grip).  It showed up about 2 weeks ago and I’ve been carrying it on and off since.  Here’s my review, for those of you who are interested. 

FIT
The Alien Gear Cloak Tuck 2.0 (AGCT2) fits nicely.  The large plastic (default option) belt clips are easy to get on and off and hold the holster securely in place.  The belt can still be slid (with reasonable effort) a bit to position the buckle in the correct place, if the belt shifts while putting the holster on.  I have found this NOT to be the case with the Crossbreed SuperTuck Deluxe (CBSTD), which I personally found to be frustrating.  

The only downside I found is that while the CBSTD could be put on with only loosening my belt and slipping it in, I haven’t found that to be possible with the AGCT2.  It might be with more practice, but so far I’ve found I need to open my belt completely and unbutton my pants.  I’m hoping that’s only a practice/experience issue, but it’s too early to tell.  

The AGCT2 leather back is cut so the thumb can easily get around the grip, between the grip and your body.  I believe Crossbreed calls this the Combat Cut and charges an extra 5 or 7 dollars for this option.  My CBSTD does not have this “combat cut”.  While this provides a bit more leather surface area to disperse the weight/pressure of the gun a bit more, I haven’t noticed any significant difference in comfort from the CBSTD to the AGCT2.

Reholstering my Stery is easy and natural.  Granted, this is something I will hopefully never have to do while actually carrying, but while practicing at home, I found this to be marginally, yet noticeably, easier with the AGCT2 than with the CBSTD.  I suspect this has more to do with the particular handguns in question (a Steyr M357 for the AG, and either a Sig P220 Compact SAO or HK USP Tactical 45 (full-size) for the CBSTD) than it does with the holster itself.

FINISH
The finish appears to be of excellent quality.  The leather front is supple and soft.  The kydex holster is sturdy and well-shaped.  The neoprene backing/padding is soft and comfortable, though, given the size of a IWB holster of this style, I didn’t find it worlds apart in terms of comfort compared to the standard leather back of the CBSTD.  I found the factory retention to be a bit loose for my liking, but not exceptionally so, as since the retention can be adjusted, I found no real fault with respect to this.

FEATURES
Adjustable retention – The tension on the kydex can be adjusted to the user’s preference.
Adjustable height and cant – Both the height and cant are adjustable simply by removing and repositioning the clips.  The factory height has the top of the kydex about a quarter inch about the belt, for me, and the cant is set at the FBI’s standard 15 degrees.  I’ve not had to change either.
Neoprene-backing – the holster has a neoprene-back so as to be more comfortable for the wearer.  While I did find it more comfortable than my CBSTD, it was not a huge difference or one that, to me, would be enough to make me choose this holster in and of itself.
Swappable Kydex shell – The kydex holster shell can be swapped out, making it more cost effective for a user to switch carry pieces.  So, for about $13, you can have an IWB holster for a new piece, instead of $30 - $40 for a whole new holster.
Parts kit – the AGCT2 comes with a spare parts kit, that looks to include every spare part you might need (with the exception of the leather back, the holster shell and the belt clips, of course).  I haven’t had to use mine, and hope I don’t,  but it’s nice to have – especially considering I’ve lost numerous bolts and washers with my CBSTD.
Free Shell Trades for Life – If you know you want to permanently switch to a different carry piece, you can trade you shell for another for free.  For life.  For an unlimited number of times.
30 day trial – if you don’t like it, they’ll buy it back.  I like mine, but it is nice peace of mind when trying out a new company/brand of holster.
Warranty – They say if any part of the holster ever breaks, including the clips, they’ll replace it for free.  I’ve not had to use this (and would be seriously concerned if I had to, after just 2 weeks), but it’s nice to know it’s there if I need it.

COMFORT
I’m a big guy and finding a comfortable holster is something that took me a long time to do, and that was the CBSTD.  That’s also one of the reasons I was hesitant to leave the CBSTD and try something else.  I wear my IWB about approximately the 3:30 to 4:00 position.  Also, I’m admittedly out of practice with carrying as lately I’ve stopped doing it every day due to work issues.  Still, any time we go shopping or out and about, I am carrying.  

That being said, I found the AGCT2 to be very comfortable.  Within 5 minutes of first putting it on for the very first time, I barely noticed it was there.  Kind of that reassuring pressure feeling that a good IWB leaves you with once you’re used to it.  That’s also with it being ice-cold and fairly inflexible, as I literally picked up the box from outside our garage door, took it in the house, opened it, and put it on.  And I live in Wisconsin…and this was in February.  Having worn it now for a couple weeks, so it’s broken in, I pretty much don’t notice it’s there.   The weight is evenly dispersed.  The backing is soft enough and wide enough that even with my “additional bulk” it doesn’t create any undo pressure or pain.  Even when driving our minivan or or Camry, the holster is comfortable and doesn’t cause any issues with buckling or unbuckling my seatbelt.

CONCEALABILITY
I don’t wear tucked in shirts for my current job, but this holster allows for that.  With the untucked polo or button down shirts I do wear, even with being a big guy and the 4.0 inch barrel and full grip of the double stack Steyr M357 that I carry, the AGCT2 rides tight and close to my body, pretty much disappearing.  Being as it’s winter…and I live in Wisconsin…and it’s been a stupid cold February, I haven’t had any issues with printing, but since this holster rides as tight or tighter as the CBSTD that I used to carry with my aforementioned Sig and HK, and I didn’t have any printing issues with those, I really don’t expect to have any printing issues with this, either.  

COST
At about half the cost of the CBSTD, yet with extras and features that either aren’t available for the CBSTD, or have an additional cost, the AGCT2 is a great buy at $30-$40.

OVERALL
I’m very impressed with the quality of the Alien Gear Cloak Tuck 2.0, as I am with its overall value.  It’s half the cost of the Crossbreed SuperTuck Deluxe, which is widely considered to be the best of breed for this style of holster, yet easily matches them in terms of quality, value, features, extras, warranty, etc.  

Admittedly, I’m not doing a strict apples to apples comparison, since I’m not comparing the same exact handgun for each, but I did stack the Sig and the Steyr on top of each other and I was surprised to find that they’re basically the same overall size, due to the much lower bore-axis of Steyr’s design.  Roughly the same overall height, length and width.  I didn’t actually measure them, but I would estimate them to be within an 1/8 inch of each other for any given dimension, and that’s close enough for me.  Fully loaded, the weight of the all-metal Sig vs the metal and polymer Steyr is roughly the same, as well.  

All in all, I feel the comparison is pretty well matched and while I can’t say if it’s right for you, I can say it’s right for me, and it’s what I’ll be going with for this style of holster in the future.  

Let me know if you have any specific questions or if you think there’s anything I left out that you’d like me to add.

As an aside…it wasn’t my intent to knock the Crossbreed or their SuperTuck Deluxe holster (and I don’t think I did that), I simply used them as my comparison holster because that’s the only other holster of this style that I have, and that’s what I’ve personally used.
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Joshua Hocieniec's profile photoDevin Hill's profile photoJeremy Ratliff's profile photoPaul Wolfe's profile photo
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I have 2 of the 2.0 holsters (.40 Sig and S&W .380).  Both are outstanding, and blow comfort away compared to my Crossbreed Supertuck.  

I'll use both for a year and see how they hold up for EDC.  My Crossbreed is in excellent shape after a year.
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Dean Ballweg

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On the radio this morning I heard an advertisement for an Android and iPhone app called PulsePoint, which is now available locally.

The app is released by PulsePoint Foundation and is rolled out in conjunction with local Fire, EMS, Health Care, Communication, 911, and Leadership/Elected Officials, among others.

What it does is send push notifications automatically to users when a 911 dispatch center receives a call for a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) victim needing CPR within a set distance (usually walking distance) of the SCA victim. The push notification goes out the same time as an ambulance/paramedic/EMS is dispatched.

The PulsePoint Foundation’s reasoning is that without blood flow to the brain, brain damage can occur in fewer than 8 minutes and the victim has little chance of being resuscitated after 10 minutes.

Accordingto the PulsePoint Foundation, even in the best circumstances, emergency responders typically take almost that long to arrive on scene. Having citizen responders who can get on-scene and start CPR quicker gives the victim a better chance of surviving.

When this app is rolled out to a community, as I said earlier, it’s done in conjunction with Fire, EMS, Health Care, Communication, 911, Leadership/Elected Officials and others. All of whom tacitly or outrightly agree that emergency responders simply can’t consistently, or with any sort of guarantee, respond in time to this kind of emergency situation.

Emergency responders can’t respond in time, so they’re turning to the citizenry for help.

Sound familiar?

You're right...it’s exactly like what so many of us on the pro-gun side argue for why we carry concealed firearms! In the event of a different kind of life threatening emergency, we also know that emergency responders can’t respond in time and we want to be able to help our loved ones, those in our care, and ourselves.

If only the self-awareness that’s shown here (related to this app, the reasoning behind it and the limitations of the timeliness of emergency responders) would extend to gun rights, concealed carry, etc.




As an aside, if you’re interested in the PulsePoint App and/or want to see if it’s available in your area, you can go here:

http://www.pulsepoint.org/pulsepoint-respond/
There’s power in your community—bystanders ready to help save more lives from sudden cardiac arrest. But how can you seize that potential and activate your citizens to change patient outcomes? The answer is PulsePoint.
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Jeff Stevens's profile photoDean Ballweg's profile photo
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Who said anything about encouraging, +Jeff Stevens?  All I'm saying is they should stop trying to prevent those who want to carry concealed weapons from doing so.  That's a far cry from encouraging.

As to the risk that may not be worth the cost, two points for you to consider.

First, for the past few years there have been somewhere around 9,000 homicides committed with firearms each year.  It's estimated, through numerous studies over the past 20+ years, including some by the Clinton Administration, that there are somewhere between 200,000 and 2.5 million successful DGUs (defensive gun uses) per year, with the "accepted" figure being somewhere between 400k and 800k, IIRC.  Admittedly, not all of those situations would have resulted in a death had a successful DGU not occurred, but I'd bet the number of homicides prevented is far greater than 9,000.

Second, according to the anti-gun Violence Policy Center's own data, there were 18 concealed carry permit holders who committed a homicide while carrying concealed in 2012...out of somewhere around 8.2 million concealed carry permit holders in the U.S.  That's about .0002% of concealed carry permit holders.  

So while it "*can*" make a situation worse, it really doesn't, and the risk (which is beyond negligible) is certainly worth the cost.
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First time out with my new Steyr M357.

Not bad, but not where I'd like to be, either.

The .357 Sig is definitely snappier than my .45's, even with taking into consideration that they're all metal, heavier guns than is the Steyr.

This one is going to take some extra practice before I really feel comfortable with it. (Which isn't necessarily a bad thing.)

Edited to add...This was also my first time shooting the Birds & Bullets ammo I bought recently. 124gr FMJ flat point reloads. Very shiny, very clean, and one extra rounds in the loose-pack box of "100".
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Nello Jennings's profile photoDean Ballweg's profile photoMike Davis's profile photoPatrol Tactical's profile photo
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Looks like a good day!
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Dean Ballweg

Discussion  - 
 
I have a list of guns that I want to buy. Why is it that whenever I buy something, my list somehow grows by at least two?
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+Peter Spinale Hail Hydra!!!
(Seriously. My list was down to 4. I bought 1, and now it's 6.)
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Dean Ballweg

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Goddammit! No!

At least Ryan Reynolds is out. And nothing against Tom Cruise, but he's no Juan Sanchez Villa-Lobos Ramirez.

More importantly, while I liked Bautista in Guardians of the Galaxy, he's no Clancy (Motherfuckin'!) Brown.

Most importantly, of all the movies that should not be remade, this might be at the top of the list. (Which is what my opening line refers to, incidentally.)
The actor is rumored to play The Kurgan in Cedric Nicolas Troyan's remake.
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Dean Ballweg

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As much as I hate being up before the sun, I've been loving the sunrises over Lake Monona as I drive in to work lately.  I decided to stop and take a couple pictures this morning.
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You're welcome. :) 
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Dean Ballweg

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Yesterday I found out my family’s old farm (house, buildings and five acres (of the original 200)) are for sale again.  We quit farming in 1990, when I was 16 and a sophomore in high school, and eventually sold the farm in 1992, the weekend that I graduated high school.  

My mom and dad went and walked through everything earlier in the day and invited us out to go through it with them later yesterday.

So we did so I could show Jenny and the kids where I grew up.

Turns out it's in foreclosure and pretty much everything has either gone to hell and/or been destroyed from either neglect or intentional efforts.

Much of the house is unchanged, inside and out...and that's not a good thing.  Same siding, vinyl flooring, same carpeting, same paneling on the walls, etc as we put in when we sold it, but now 22 years older.  The windows were replaced at some point, though, so that's something, anyway.  The five bedroom house is now 8, with the rec room converted into two more bedrooms and one added in the basement.  One of the bedroom walls were even painted black and “starry” and nearly every door inside had an extremely strong exterior grade lock on it, with anti-intrusion panels around the knob.  Pretty much every door had a hole/dent punched in it, too.  

Most of the buildings are just gone or close to it. There were a couple even my dad and I wouldn't go in, much less Jenny and the kids. Support posts and cement blocks knocked out of barn and shed walls, roofs with huge holes or the bare wood exposed with no shingles left, steps and doors missing, windows broke out, and many of the building packed full of garbage inside.  Not so much garbage that you couldn't move through them, but a lot, just the same.

I’m pretty sure literally every roof of the house and all the buildings would need serious, serious work.  My dad’s estimate was that if someone bought it, it would take a professional roofer weeks if not a month to fix all the roofs.

I’m not even sure where you'd start inside some of the buildings.  Definitely fix the holes in the concrete/cinder block walls, replace nearly all of the windows, replace most of the doors, and then replace and reinforce a bunch of structural support posts.  That’s not even considering anything cosmetic (painting, lesser siding issues, etc) that would need to be done to the buildings.

So sad to see the farm that was in our family for 125 years neglected and destroyed like this.  

And the bank only wants...245,000 for it.  I don't think it's worth 200K, the shape it’s in. The amount of work that would need to be done...overwhelming.

Anyway, here are some pictures I took.  Once I got over the initial shock of how bad it was.

***edited to update the price.  it should have been $245,000.  Apparently I mis-heard my Dad when he told me the price they were asking.
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Carlton Dodd's profile photoGreg B's profile photoDean Ballweg's profile photoWilliam Lemios's profile photo
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about 25 miles east of Madison, WI.
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(This is firearm-related, Mods, I swear!)

On the radio this morning I heard an advertisement for an Android and iPhone app called PulsePoint which is now available locally. The app is released by PulsePoint Foundation and is rolled out in conjunction with local Fire, EMS, Health Care, Communication, 911, and Leadership/Elected Officials, among others.

What it does is send push notifications automatically to users when a 911 dispatch center receives a call for a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) victim needing CPR within a set distance (usually walking distance) of the SCA victim. The push notification goes out the same time as an ambulance/paramedic/EMS is dispatched.

The PulsePoint Foundation’s reasoning is that without blood flow to the brain, brain damage can occur in fewer than 8 minutes and the victim has little chance of being resuscitated after 10 minutes. Even in the best circumstances, emergency responders typically take almost that long to arrive on scene. Having citizen responders who can get on-scene and start CPR quicker gives the victim a better chance of surviving.

When this app is rolled out to a community, as I said earlier, it’s done in conjunction with Fire, EMS, Health Care, Communication, 911, Leadership/Elected Officials and others. All of whom tacitly or outrightly agree that emergency responders simply can’t consistently, or with any sort of guarantee, respond in time to this kind of emergency situation.

Emergency responders can’t respond in time, so they’re turning to the citizenry for help.

Sound familiar?

You're right...it’s exactly like what so many of us on the pro-gun side argue for why we carry concealed firearms - in the event of another kind of life threatening emergency, we also know that emergency responders can’t respond in time and want to be able to help our loved ones, those in our care, and ourselves.

If only the self-awareness that’s shown here, related to this app and the reasoning behind it, would extend to gun rights, concealed carry, etc.




As an aside, if you’re interested in the PulsePoint App and/or want to see if it’s available in your area, you can go here:

http://www.pulsepoint.org/pulsepoint-respond/
There’s power in your community—bystanders ready to help save more lives from sudden cardiac arrest. But how can you seize that potential and activate your citizens to change patient outcomes? The answer is PulsePoint.
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Dean Ballweg's profile photojennifer blaisdell's profile photo2A Holster's profile photoPaul Rodgers's profile photo
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+jennifer blaisdell
WoW! Just wow!
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Dean Ballweg

Discussion  - 
 
I am admittedly, and woefully, ignorant about all things AK and SKS.

That being said, I'd like to get one of them to take advantage of the cheap ammo that's out there.

From what I've seen online, it looks like SKS's can be modified to take AK magazines. Additionally, I know whichever one I get is likely to be converted to a bullpup at some point in the future.

I also wouldn't be attempting to any sort of even remotely accurate target shooting with either.

I'm thinking an SKS is going to be enough to suit my needs (wants), but I'm wondering if anyone here had any advice, things I should be wary of, recommendations either way, etc.

For example, I've heard Yugo SKS variants are generally good, but is that true, are there others that are good, are there others to stay away from...that sort of thing.

Any thoughts? Any good sites I can go to for accurate information? Any particular places to look for them?

Thanks.
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Jeremy Ratliff's profile photoZack Marrs's profile photoCarl O's profile photoDean Ballweg's profile photo
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+Carl O I had a Bushmaster M17, but I got rid of it.  Of course, that was something like 15 years ago, and I don't have a clue why I got rid of it anymore.

I do remember "cutting" down a tree with it, though.
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Dean Ballweg

Discussion  - 
 
This is a new offering made by Dominion Arms, the DA P762.  It's currently not available in the U.S., but is available in Canada, for some mind-boggling reason.

It's a clone of the Sig P226, but 'embiggened' and chambered in 7.62x25.  In Canada, it goes for about $400 and is limited to 10 rounds, although full capacity would be 17 rounds.  It apparently became available sometime in (late?) 2014.

So basically what we have here is my dream come to life.  A modern design, solid construction, double stack pistol chambered in my favorite caliber...all for a reasonable price.  And I can't have it.

So close...and yet so far.

Anyone else want one?!?



On a side note...my list of guns I want just grew by 1 more.  
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From what I could find the parent company, Norinco, had a lot of their stuff banned from import in 1993, with the rest of it banned in 2003 by the Bush Administration.

Here's what Wikipedia has to say:
In 1993, the import of most Norinco firearms and ammunition into the United States was blocked under new trade rules when China's permanent normal trade relations status was renewed. The prohibition did not apply to sporting shotguns or shotgun ammunition however. In 1994, U.S. Customs agents conducted a sting against Atlanta based importers of Norinco firearms.[2]

In August 2003, the Bush Administration imposed sanctions on Norinco for allegedly selling missile-related goods to Iran.[3] These sanctions led to a prohibition on imports into the US of the remaining types of firearms and ammunition not covered by the 1993 ban.
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Anyone have any experience with the PPs-43c "pistol"?

Good, bad, indifferent?

Seems to have good reviews online, and the price looks decent. I'm thinking about picking one up.
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Mike Massa's profile photoEric Steele's profile photoDean Ballweg's profile photoCarl O's profile photo
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Carl O
 
my experience with them was just picking one up in the gun store, seeing how small the sights were I wouldn't want one without a stock, I am very seriously considering a conversion to a carbine using a 16.5" barrel
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Story
Tagline
"Most of what follows is true."
Introduction
Heretic, amateur baker of fine desserts, (very) occasional (lately) writer, thinker, joker, genius, and "a thousand times more humble than thou art."
Bragging rights
Married with two beautiful, funny, super smart little girls, a new baby boy. Also, I have a cat that I am challenged daily to like.
Education
  • University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
    Mass Communications, 1994 - 1997
    Bachelor of Science
  • University of Wisconsin-Baraboo/Sauk County
    1993 - 1994
    as many general/basic requirements as I could get out of my way
  • Milwaukee School of Engineering
    Mechanical Engineering, 1992 - 1993
  • Sauk Prairie High School
    Everything, it was high school. This is a stupid question., 1988 - 1992
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
Work
Occupation
Senior Software Test Engineer at the National Conference of Bar Examiners
Skills
Certified Usability Analyst (Human Factors International), Certified Tester; Foundation Level (ISTQB)
Employment
  • National Conference of Bar Examiners
    Senior Software Test Engineer, 2014 - present
  • Dean Health Plan (Kforce Consulting)
    Quality Assurance Test Lead, 2014 - 2014
  • Forte Research Systems
    Senior Software QA Engineer, CUA, 2008 - 2014
  • Forte Research Systems
    Implementation Services - Implementation Coordinator, 2006 - 2008
  • Epic Systems
    Implementation Services - Application Manager, 2004 - 2006
  • Epic Systems
    Quality Assurance, 1997 - 2006
  • WKBT
    Production Assistant, 1997 - 1997
  • WKBT
    Floor Crew, 1995 - 1997
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Cambridge, WI - Roxbury, WI - La Crosse, WI - Milwaukee, WI - Roxbury, WI - Sauk City, WI
Links
We took home carry-out from here last night. It was our first time eating "at" this restaurant. Service: The person who answered the phone was very helpful. I explained that we'd never been to their place before and he was patient in answering my questions about the menu (which is hard to read online, but apparently being updated soon), and gave me advice about a couple different options I was curious about. When we got there to pick up our order, we were greeted immediately and passed on to the correct person right away to pick up our order instead of seated in the dining room. Decor: We didn't spend much time inside the restaurant as our order was to go, but from what I saw it looked nicely done. Either recently remodeled or very well cleaned and maintained. There is a good sized dining room and a separate bar area. It was decorated in (stereo)typical italian-american restaurant style (which isn't necessarily a bad thing). Food: The food was very rich, bordering on too rich, however, with that being said, it was good. Here are some details, as well as an explanation as to why I only rated the food a "1". I ordered a small regular crust Maui pizza (canadian bacon, bacon, and pineapple (plus I added fresh mushrooms)). The crust is a bread style crust, chewy and soft on the edges and it held up nicely in the center. There ingredients were plentiful without being overloaded and overall the pizza was very good. My wife ordered the Fettuccine Alfredo and for my 4 year old daughter we ordered the Cheese Ravioli with Alfredo sauce. Both were very rich, almost too rich, as I said. Additionally, the Alfredo sauce was loaded with (sauteed?) onions, which overpowered the rest of the sauce and left an unpleasant aftertaste. This is part of the reason I only rated the food section a "1". The Fettuccine came with a slice of garlic bread which was very heavy on the garlic, and we also ordered cheese sticks, which were disappointing in that they were very thin, somewhat soggy, and overly greasy. This is the other part of the reason I only rated the food section a "1". The price seemed a bit on the high side, and the $1.00 upcharge to have Alfredo sauce instead of Marina sauce on my daughters Cheese Ravioli was both unmentioned and seemed like a "nickel-and-dime" extra...especially since one of the items on the menu is a "build-your-own" pasta which includes either Marina or Alfredo sauce for the same price. This 'upcharge' issue is why I only rated the Service a "2", instead of a 3, since we weren't informed about this at the time we ordered when it had already been established that we were a first time customer. In summary, the service and decor were good, my pizza was good, but the pastas left us feeling disappointed. We'll probably try them again, but this time we'll likely stick with pizza or maybe try the calzones that were also on the menu.
• • •
Food: GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
1 review
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