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I'm researching digital scholarship with Shakespeare scholarship as my example. I am particularly interested in  networks of scholars and scholarship, but would love to know about any aspect of this, including computational analysis, online variora, etc.

Here's some of what I know about already:

- Delicious list of databases http://delicious.com/stacks/view/S7wHUr
- The Gale Collection http://www.gale.cengage.com/
- Folios: http://shakes.meisei-u.ac.jp/e-index.html
- http://www.quartos.org
- Shakespeare Database Project http://www.shkspr.uni-muenster.de/
- http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org
- The Tempest for iPad
- The crowdsourced issue of Shakespeare Quarterly http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/24/arts/24peer.html
- Blogs like http://bloggingshakespeare.com and http://findingingshakespeare.co.uk, but I'd love to know about more

I know this is barely a scratched surface. Any pointers? Thanks!
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David, not Shakespeare, but an important milestone and something that should be on your radar screen (and/or footnote): Dante. La Divina Commedia: Testo, Concordanze, Lessici, Rimario, Indici [First book whose contents were produced entirely by computer technology and a Dante milestone]. Milan: IBM Italia, 1965. 4to. xxiv, 981pp. The book consists of the Vandelli text of the Commedia, a concordance, and not less than nine varieties of word listings and indexes. Commissioned by IBM in Italy on the 700 year anniversary of Dante's birth, this book, the first book whose entire contents was the result of computer technology, was printed in a limited edition for restricted distribution. Not only does it supply the scholar with word listings never before available for the Comedy, but the work was accomplished at a speed inconceivable to most scholars of the time. Even the most confirmed critcs and skeptics of the usefulness of technology in literary scholarship and research had to acknowledge this volume to be a most significant achievement. [previous taken from one of my descriptions.]

This book embodies the first real use of computational power thrown at bibliographic scholarship...very much IBM saying to the academic world, 'this is what processing power can do for the black arts'. 

Also: get in touch with the epicenter of Shakespeare scholarship, The Folger Shakespeare Library. Outstanding group working there who should be very helpful on many fronts.

Look forward to seeing the result of this project...
 
Not quite sure what's in scope, but this should yield an embarrassment of riches. Where to start?

How about Global Shakespeares: http://globalshakespeares.mit.edu, which includes ASIA, the Asian Shakespeare Intercultural Archive: http://web.mit.edu/shakespeare/asia/about/asia.html  

World Shakespeare Project: http://www.worldshakespeareproject.org/

The New Oxford Shakespeare: http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/shakespeare/  

Shakespeare Cognition Research Project http://ihr.asu.edu/research/seed/shakespeare-cognition-research-project-classical-drama-and-perceptions-race and follow-on, Research System Infrastructure and Informatics Solutions for Digital Humanities, https://ihr.asu.edu/research/seed/research-system-infrastructure-and-informatics-solutions-digital-humanities 

Probably out of scope, but I thought it was cool: Shakespeare and Autism Project: https://shakespeare.osu.edu/shakespeare-and-autism-project

What fun you're going to have!
 
A quick correction: A|S|I|A (Asian Shakespeare Intercultural Archive) is an independent project from Global Shakespeares and is available at http://a-s-i-a-web.org
The key aspect of its digital scholarship is the networking of multiple languages and cultural contexts for Shakespeare scholarship within one site. Detailed data and script translations are concurrently prepared by translators and editors working in different contexts and cultures -- Shakespeare performance as a cultural network, if you like! 
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