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David Wegmuller
Lives in Redwood City, California
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David Wegmuller

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Working at home is nice, but I sometimes miss some of the equipment we have at the office...
Today, I needed to do a precise cut on a PCB: at the office, I would use one of the microscopes in the lab.
At home improvised using a suction cup mount, my Sony A6000 with its macro lens.
Using focus magnification gives me a clear view of the work area.
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http://www.rammount.com/search/suction+cup

I'm quite happy with their stuff.

edit: Except when it's on the passenger's side floor, after falling off the windscreen.

To be perfectly fair, it's after at least a few months and large swings in temperature are involved.
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Needed a lot less negative camber to stay on those hills…
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A design for a pocket-version of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) made out of Lego has been developed one year ago. For Lego to consider it for a new product, it needs about 3000 more signatures.

Read more: http://cern.ch/go/Lego
Make #LHCLego a reality - vote for it: http://cern.ch/go/l6MK

The video was created by enthusiasts of Lego, CERN & the science community.
Video © What’s the Matter/CERN
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Good video
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Some clever tricks in here - fascinating!
via TYWKIWDBI
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Yes wonderful
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David Wegmuller

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Have you ever found a USB drive left behind in a restaurant or parking lot, or perhaps a  library? Did you pick it up and plug it into your computer in order to find a way to return it? Among the cybersecurity community, there is anecdotal evidence that many people, whether behaving altruistically or due to social engineering, will indeed plug a found USB drive into their computer, exposing themselves (and potentially entire systems) to cyberattack.

But does does this kind of attack actually work or is it merely a myth? To put this attack to the test, researchers from the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign and the University of Michigan, along with Google anti-abuse & security researcher +Elie Bursztein, dropped nearly 300 USB sticks on the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign campus and measured who plugged in the drives.

They found that users picked up, plugged in, and clicked on files in 48% of the drives dropped. Furthermore, users did so quickly: the first drive was connected in under six minutes! Head over to Elie's blog, where he summarizes the study, highlights the key findings, looks at what motivates people to plug in USB sticks, and discusses possible mitigations to improve USB security.
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David Wegmuller's profile photoWilliam “Chief Engineer” Papa's profile photoBill Jordan's profile photoJac Carter's profile photo
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People in the US and other affluent nations shouldn't be stupid enough to risk their security for something worth so little to them. But people in developing countries often can't get or can't afford USB sticks. Some people when traveling to Cuba will bring little gifts or donations with them to give to schools or whoever. Batteries, school supplies, reading glasses, USB sticks, and lots of other things we consider basics are needed in Cuba and often given as donations to people there.
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David Wegmuller

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Not my work. I wish I had the time to build on such massive scale!
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It is great! Amazing all the detail Lego works and planning. Thanks for sharing. we enjoyed it very much. :)
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I bought this camera for its lens after watching this video: https://youtu.be/5uGTzwBQ4-w
The plan is to adapt the lens to my Sony A6000. First, since I got a fully working camera (for a total of $29, including shipping from Russia), I decided to run one roll of film through it.
There were three problems (aside from the fact that I've never shot film with a fully manual camera):
1. No meter. To get a good idea of the exposure, I used my digital camera's built in meter as a guide. I think this turned out pretty well.
2. The frame counter didn't work right and the film advance had some issues too, resulting in some crazy multiple exposures, spanning two frames!
3. The only focusing "help" is the distances marked on the lens. As a result, none of the pictures are in focus.
I think I will go ahead with my original plan to adapt the lens to my digital camera... In parallel, I'm thinking of getting another film camera, probably a Olympus as I have two lenses for it already (adapted to the A6000).
7 new photos · Album by David Wegmuller
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Scale focus takes a bit of effort to adjust to. I have a Rollei 35 with scale-focus only and by now I can focus it pretty well. The trick is to spend a bit of occasional time practising distance estimation:

* How long is your arm when you stretch it straight out? Likely around 0.7-0.8m. measure it, and you'll have a set point for close focusing.

* Look at and measure stuff around you (measure with your digital camera for instance, or even with an actual tape measure). How far is it to the other edge of your dining room table? How long is the "sofa" in the subway? How far to the other side of the room? To the other side of the road?

You do that kind of thing for just a few days and you'll soon notice that you're getting a lot better at guessing distances. Don't worry about anything beyond ~10-15m or so; that is all hyperfocal or infinite distance. And the accuracy matters more the closer you get. At 10m you only need to be within 2m or so for the picture to look fine.

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I remember when the term "foamer" came out, it may have been Larry Wines, the founder of San Bernardino Railroad Historical Society and the original Project Coordinator for Santa Fe 3751's restoration back in early 1981. I remember him using that term many times.

Railfans in general as I said have made a bad name for themselves. The railroads recognize the legitimate 'hobbyists' within the group of people who have interests in railroads, locomotives and trains, but there is a shallow-minded mentality that characterizes the 'rail fan' in general. Having been a locomotive engineer myself and being a life member in two active railroad museums (meaning they restore railroad equipment to operate), I have seen the care in which the museums sort out the railfans from the legitimate 'hobbyists' and the way in which professional railroaders grin and shake their heads at the very mention of railfans while acknowledging the higher level of 'railroad enthusiasts' and 'railroad hobbyists'. I have seen it. And with anything else, when 'certain' people disregard correctness and function on mentally-absent emotions, they earn a reputation that in the railroad business has become known as 'railfans'.
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I tagged you due to train track memes, but I guess both apply...

Win/win? I think so. 
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This is an amazing indoor/outdoor Lego train track. To be honest, I'm a bit jealous...
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I took a friend on a walking tour of downtown San Francisco. 
28 new photos · Album by David Wegmuller
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Nice time
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If you're in Chicago during the coming year, this looks like a great show.
Adam Reed Tucker is one of 14 Lego “certified professionals” in the world. His extraordinarily detailed Lego models contain up to 64,000 bricks and req ...
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+Susan Jahn absolutely must see this.
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Have him in circles
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Work
Occupation
I'm an Engineer. Mostly embedded software and a bit of hardware.
Skills
I'm equally comfortable working on everything from electrical engineering to desktop software. Languages include several assemblers, C, C++, Java, VB and Python.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Networking
Other names
dwegmull on various sites and boards (twitter, Hooniverse, Atomic Toasters, TeslaMotorsClub and Jalopnik)
Story
Tagline
Steam powered.
Introduction
I'm an Engineer. Mostly software and electrical. In my spare time, I dabble in mechanical engineering. I build and run steam engines. I build challenging models in Lego.
I'm also a big car enthusiast. I drive a Telsa Model S, but I still enjoy good old fashion internal combustion engines!
Bragging rights
I build and repair miniature steam engines and associated boilers.
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Currently
Redwood City, California
Previously
Palo Alto, California - Prevessin-Moens, France - Fremont, California - Union City, Caliornia
Links
Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago
It's a classic ice cream shop: what's not to like?
Public - 5 years ago
reviewed 5 years ago
Not as good as it used to be. Maybe it feels that way because other shopping options are now available, especially online.
Public - 5 years ago
reviewed 5 years ago
Public - 5 years ago
reviewed 5 years ago
8 reviews
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Great selection, convenient location and hours. Not so great prices...
Public - 5 years ago
reviewed 5 years ago
Great produces. Love the Deli and cold / hot buffet. Some employees have a bit of an attitude, hence the lack of a fifth star.
Public - 5 years ago
reviewed 5 years ago
Great location, love the patio. Food is OK, service is uneven.
Public - 5 years ago
reviewed 5 years ago