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David Tribe
Works at U. Mebourne,Academic with expertise in genetics, biochemistry biotechnology, microbiology and food science. Beh -- and loves all things Italian.
Attended U. Melbourne B. Sc. Ph.D
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David Tribe

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Practical steps to improve staple food safety in Kenya
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Shifting tribal farmers from low-yield, low-income maize to more productive agriculture has been at the heart of Gujarat’s plan for tribal uplift
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David Tribe

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ABC Australia radio transcript shows the factors expanding the environmental impact of organic farming approaches
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35,000 tonne!? I would battle to find a rural shire in the country that grows that little grain. Shows just how small this organic thing is yet how disproportionate their voice is in agricultural discussions (and how that plays out to GM, agrichemicals, etc).
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Hysteria about #fructose  
For the past decade, a specter has haunted the food chain—the specter of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). HFCS began life as a technological response to a market problem—volatile prices for sugar in the 1970s and early 1980s driven by protectionism and dumping, along with high production costs and all the [...]
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" Just as people glom onto miracle diets and miracle foods, they also look for the Darth Vader ingredients—those which use the force of taste to take over our bodies. HFCS was new, it was from corn, it was high in fructose. And it provided a simple solution to a hugely complex problem of why America was suddenly in the grip of obesity." 
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High expression of Bt toxin benefits not only the farmers who plant the varieties but also all the other villagers.
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David Tribe

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CROP GENES IN THE WILD CAN CAUSE TROUBLE — NOT ALL THE TIME — BUT ON OCCASION. Ellstrand maintains there’s no fundamental difference between genes transferred from genetic engineering and genes that are transferred by other means, such as traditional breeding. Europe’s “weed beet” that has cost its sugar industry over a billion dollars in lost product is the result of natural hybridization between a wild beet species and (non-GMO) sugarbeet.
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Press reports don't mesh with reality on the farm.
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Conspiracy, incompetence, a federal agency out of control. A recent Mother Jones story by Mariah Blake indicts the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a threat to science and public health over the way it’s conducting research into bisphenol A (BPA), the never-ending chemical scare story of the 21st century. Raise the alarm (again), stir the pot (again), marshal outrage (again).
Conspiracy, incompetence, a federal agency out of control. A recent Mother Jones story by Mariah Blake indicts the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a threat to science and public health over the way it’s conducting research into bisphenol A (BPA), the never-ending chemical scare story of the 21st century. [...]
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Why Consumers Pay More for Organic Foods?  Fear Sells and Marketers Know it.
An academic review of more than 25 years of market research, marketing tactics and government programs driving sales in the organic and natural product industries
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and I don't buy "organic", especially meats, because I know what a joke our standards, as well as enforcement, is.
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There’s a new genetically engineered potato in town that doesn’t brown when cut or fried, nor does it make acrylamide. J. R. Simplot Company petitioned the USDA to deregulate their Innate™ potatoes, and the public comment period has just been opened up on that petition. We sent Simplot some questions about their new potatoes and the technology used to make them, and their Vice President of Plant Sciences, Haven Baker, was happy to respond. Here is that interview, and if you have more questions about it feel free to ask more, as we have asked Haven to stick around for the discussion. #GMO #RNAi
There's a new genetically engineered potato in town that doesn't brown when cut or fried, nor does it make acrylamide. J. R. Simplot Company petitioned the USDA to deregulate their Innate™ potatoes...
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I almost got a job working on this thing.  It's gonna be tough to get people to eat it, I bet.
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Have him in circles
8,730 people
Work
Occupation
University academic
Employment
  • U. Mebourne,Academic with expertise in genetics, biochemistry biotechnology, microbiology and food science. Beh -- and loves all things Italian.
    Senior Lecturer, present
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Food microbiology and gene safety connoisseur.
Introduction
Interested in correcting misuse of biology, helping people benefit from innovation.
I teach courses in food science, food safety, biotechnology and microbiology at the University of Melbourne. My Bachelor Degree is in biochemistry and my Ph.D. applied molecular genetics. Thesis topic -- production of an animal feed supplement using genetically manipulated bacteria.---My recent publications have been on epidemics caused by bacterial pathogens, published in high-ranking journals. My current area of research is food risk analysis and management. The most important of these risks are microbes in food and microbial products that are toxic.
Google Scholar citation list http://t.co/orhwESjV
Bragging rights
numerous grandchildren
Education
  • U. Melbourne B. Sc. Ph.D
    Bacterial genetics, 1966 - 1975