Profile cover photo
Profile photo
David Teachout
834 followers -
Relational Living Mentor, Intake Specialist
Relational Living Mentor, Intake Specialist

834 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
“The creative personality is always one that looks on the world as fit for change and on himself as an instrument for change. Otherwise, what are you creating for? If the world is perfectly all right the way it is, you have no place in it. The creative personality thinks of the world as a canvas for change and of himself as a divine agent of change.” https://buff.ly/2FSL40C
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
"We can travel faster and farther than ever before and hence possess the freedom to do something, but it is small in the face of being free from oppression and ideological despotism, where one’s sense of importance and grandeur is forever dampened by the darkening influence of a philosophy of separation and brokenness. Whether this takes the form of conservative religious ideologies or political/social form like fascism, the result is a limiting of space to hold real freedom. We may have the freedom, some of us, to play video games for hours on end or watch endless television shows, having the technological know-how to do so, it is for naught if we are doing so to escape the terrifying reality that we do not possess the freedom from moral and existential castration, of being cut-off from our human potential."

Freedom From, Not Freedom To Do - Life Weavings https://buff.ly/2mBdnIl
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
““The Broken Ladder” is full of studies like this. Some are more convincing than others, and, not infrequently, Payne’s inferences seem to run ahead of the data. But the wealth of evidence that he amasses is compelling. People who are made to feel deprived see themselves as less competent. They are more susceptible to conspiracy theories. And they are more likely to have medical problems. A study of British civil servants showed that where people ranked themselves in terms of status was a better predictor of their health than their education level or their actual income was.

All of which leads Payne to worry about where we’re headed. In terms of per-capita income, the U.S. ranks near the top among nations. But, thanks to the growing gap between the one per cent and everyone else, the subjective effect is of widespread impoverishment. “Inequality so mimics poverty in our minds that the United States of America . . . has a lot of features that better resemble a developing nation than a superpower,” he writes.” https://buff.ly/2DnOjMS
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
This has come up a few times in different contexts the last few weeks. Important to stipulate this isn't a disorder, just a different way of how some brains interpret the world. "People often report being able to dream in pictures, and there have been reported cases of people losing the ability to think in images after a brain injury. He is adamant that aphantasia is "not a disorder" and says it may affect up to one in 50 people.” https://buff.ly/2mhJBYZ
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A fabulous look at emotions, getting away from the reductionist and unhelpful notion that there are only a narrow hard-wired set. Certainly there is physiology, but such exists within a social and interactive context. This is why I teach emotion as a relationship between Value and behavior.
The history of human emotions https://buff.ly/2CN0kLt
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
"Traveling down the road of the impossible is filled with anxiety. The depth to which we rely on our sense of being right and our belief that the vision of reality we hold is wholly accurate cannot be overstated. Consider for a moment a time when you found out you were wrong about something important, that sense of being off-balance and the gut-wrenching concern over what else you may have mistaken. For most of us that experience is short-lived, our minds eagerly moving on to what is more basic to human experience, that of feeling right, even if it is feeling right about having been wrong."

The Insidious Lure of Dogmatism - Life Weavings https://buff.ly/2E27zPh
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
This is a must-listen. A great exploration of how the “non-elites” are destroying the foundation of a professional society. With solid criticism of current admin and American politics. Waking Up with Sam Harris by Sam Harris on Apple Podcasts https://buff.ly/2D7M0x4
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
#7: It adheres to a medical model.

Like the DSM-5, the ICD-10 adheres to a medical model—meaning that it organizes symptoms that tend to co-occur into categories and then treats these categories as disorders people "have." That is, even if it doesn't take a formal position on how best to remedy the disorders it contains, the ICD-10 views presenting problems as dysfunctions inside of people that are most efficiently grouped into distinguishable disease entities. This sort of medical model has dominated practice for a long time and is typically taken for granted, though it certainly is not the only way of conceptualizing human distress.

Top 10 Things You May Not Know About the ICD-10 https://buff.ly/2AYZidQ
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I don't agree with the central conclusion but Jaynes is well worth exploring to get your mind thinking in different directions.

"To explore the origins of this inner country, Jaynes first presents a masterful precis of what consciousness is not. It is not an innate property of matter. It is not merely the process of learning. It is not, strangely enough, required for a number of rather complex processes. Conscious focus is required to learn to put together puzzles or execute a tennis serve or even play the piano. But after a skill is mastered, it recedes below the horizon into the fuzzy world of the unconscious. Thinking about it makes it harder to do. As Jaynes saw it, a great deal of what is happening to you right now does not seem to be part of your consciousness until your attention is drawn to it."

Consciousness Began When the Gods Stopped Speaking - Issue 54: The Unspoken - Nautilus https://buff.ly/2iMtfqe
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
"The fact is that since DSM-III, every significant problem of thinking, feeling, and/or behaving (including criminal activity) is considered by psychiatry to be a “mental illness.” This spurious notion has been re-stated and promoted in all subsequent editions, including DSM-IV and DSM-IV-TR, of which Dr. Frances was the architect."

This notion that "bad behavior" is not associated with "mental illness" is unhelpful at face value. The only way to determine "mental illness" is through identification of behavior that is considered detrimental within specific societal and personal norms. In other words, "bad." The problem isn't that one is bound to the other association, the problem is the assumed accuracy of the diagnostic framing.

Mental Illness Vs. "Bad" Behavior - Mad In America https://buff.ly/2zLIB5G
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded