Elsevier changed the terms of their "Open Access" user license

The license described in my post below has changed. I'm shocked, shocked, that Elsevier quietly removed permissions from the license, namely to redistribute papers they have released under some flavour of "Open Access"

In particular, first I tried to check the license on a paper in Journal of Pure and Applied Algebra (try this one: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022404912000321) by clicking on the text 'user license', and I got a 404:

https://www.elsevier.com/open-access/userlicense/1.0

So then I tried searching Elsevier directly and found this:

https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/open-access-licenses/elsevier-user-license

from which I copy directly:

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Articles published under an Elsevier user license are protected by copyright. Users may access, download, copy, translate, text and data mine (but may not redistribute, display or adapt) the articles for non-commercial purposes provided that users:

- Cite the article using an appropriate bibliographic citation (i.e. author(s), journal, article title, volume, issue, page numbers, DOI and the link to the definitive published version on ScienceDirect)
- Maintain the integrity of the article
- Retain copyright notices and links to these terms and conditions so it is clear to other users what can and cannot be done with the article
- Ensure that, for any content in the article that is identified as belonging to a third party, any re-use complies with the copyright policies of that third party
- Any translations, for which a prior translation agreement with Elsevier has not been established, must prominently display the statement: "This is an unofficial translation of an article that appeared in an Elsevier publication. Elsevier has not endorsed this translation."
- For permission to use documents beyond permitted here, visit our permission pages.

This is a non commercial license where the use of published articles for commercial purposes is prohibited. Commercial purposes include:

- Copying or downloading articles, or linking to such postings, for further redistribution, sale or licensing, for a fee
- Copying, downloading or posting by a site or service that incorporates advertising with such content
- The inclusion or incorporation of article content in other works or services (other than normal quotations with an appropriate citation) that is then available for sale or licensing, for a fee
- Use of articles or article content (other than normal quotations with appropriate citation) by for-profit organizations for promotional purposes, whether for a fee or otherwise.
- Use for the purposes of monetary reward by means of sale, resale, license, loan, transfer or other form of commercial exploitation.

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You'll notice, unlike below, redistribution, displaying or adapting is now expressly forbidden! I tried the Wayback machine, and I found this:

https://web-beta.archive.org/web/20150311201056/http://www.elsevier.com/about/open-access/open-access-policies/oa-license-policy/elsevier-user-license

which starts off

"Articles published under an Elsevier user license are protected by copyright and may be used for non-commercial purposes. Users may access, download, copy, translate, text mine and data mine the articles provided that users:"

so redistribution was not expressly forbidden in March 2015, but it had been dropped from the license quoted below.

Elsevier giveth, and Elsevier taketh away.

cc +Mike Taylor +Richard Poynder +Mark C. Wilson +Scott Morrison +Timothy Gowers
The following is the policy on the Open Archive papers in Elsevier's back catalogue, which covers pretty much all the mathematics papers published  4 years ago and earlier. Does this mean I can use a script to download all of the articles covered? Such an action would be necessary if I were to data mine the corpus. +Alicia Wise , could you clarify, keeping in mind I have no commercial applications whatsoever for what I want to do with the articles?

Here's a bigger question: if I can redistribute non-commercially, does that mean I can dump the corpus into a not-for-profit archival service, provide I link to the url given below? Can I torrent the corpus as long as I include a disclaimer as asked for below?

Question for mathematicians: would this sort of thing be helpful, if it were permitted? How hard would it be to extract all the papers? (I am not a programmer)

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"Elsevier also provides access to archived material through our Open Archives. These articles are published in a subscription journal and after a journal-specific embargo period, Elsevier enables these articles to become open access.

Once the articles have been made open access, they will have specific user rights defined by a bespoke license tailored for the research environment, detailed below:

Open Archive articles: are protected by copyright and may be used for non-commercial purposes. Users may access, download, copy, display, redistribute, adapt, translate, text mine and data mine the articles provided that:

* They cite the article using an appropriate bibliographic citation (i.e. author(s), journal, article title, volume, issue, page numbers, DOI and the link to the definitive published version on ScienceDirect)
* They maintain the integrity of the article
* They retain copyright notices and links to these terms and conditions so it is clear to other users what can and cannot be done with the article
* They ensure that, for any content in the article that is identified as belonging to a third party, any re-use complies with the copyright policies of that third party
* Any translations, for which a prior translation agreement with Elsevier has not been established, must prominently display the statement: "This is an unofficial translation of an article that appeared in an Elsevier publication. Elsevier has not endorsed this translation."

Use of published articles for commercial purposes is prohibited. Commercial purposes include:

* Copying or downloading articles, or linking to such postings, for further redistribution, sale or licensing, for a fee
* Copying, downloading or posting by a site or service that incorporates advertising with such content
* The inclusion or incorporation of article content in other works or services (other than normal quotations with an appropriate citation) that is then available for sale or licensing, for a fee
* Use of articles or article content (other than normal quotations with appropriate citation) by for-profit organizations for promotional purposes, whether for a fee or otherwise.
* Use for the purposes of monetary reward by means of sale, resale, license, loan, transfer or other form of commercial."
http://www.elsevier.com/about/open-access/oa-and-elsevier/oa-license-policy#open-archive
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