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David Roberts
Works at University of Adelaide
Lives in Adelaide, Australia
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David Roberts

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It's under a CC-BY license!

#creativecommons  
 
We’ve kept this on the down-low long enough, I think: together with Aldo Antonelli, Jeremy Avigad, Nicole Wyatt, and Audrey Yap, I’ve been working on an open source advanced logic textbook for a little while; Andy Arana and Gillian Russell are also on the…
We've kept this on the down-low long enough, I think: together with Aldo Antonelli, Jeremy Avigad, Nicole Wyatt, and Audrey Yap, I've been working on an open source advanced logic textbook for a li...
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At the +RiAus​​​ ECR event on science communication. Interested to see how it turns out.

I believe it's being livestreamed here

http://riaus.org.au/livestreaming/

And on Twitter, #ECRchat #scicomm
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Lots of good advice here, both in watching and for being in a taped lecture.
 
Igor Pak has been collecting videos of combinatorics lectures and he has a big collection of them to share with us.
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+Hayden Roberts not all, I'm afraid. Videos of lectures are different to most stuff on YouTube, since you cannot change lectures to suit video so much that the live experience suffers. And you only get one take.
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Paper accepted in Homology, Homotopy and Applications, woohoo!


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The great thing about publishing in a journal like that is that no matter how many times you get around to it, it's never the same twice. :-)

Mazal tov! 
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tl;dr Editor in chief of the Medical Journal of Australia [1] (owned by Australian Medical Association) is sacked for opposing the move to outsource publishing to #Elsevier .

Some quotes from the article [2]

Professor Leeder said he was removed because he raised concerns about the plan to outsource production of the journal.
...
Professor Zimmet said the deal to hand over production of the MJA to Elsevier raised many ethical concerns. "This decision should be examined very closely," he said. "My concern is that the next step could be to follow up with appointing editorial staff that follow Elsevier's agenda."

Two leading Australian academics, Professor Gary Wittert and Professor Michael Horowitz, described Professor Leeder as a man of outstanding intellect and integrity.
...
"The majority, if not all board members, including ourselves have indicated they will resign and believe that the Australian medical community, who we understand have not been consulted, will be appropriately outraged,"

The MJA runs under an interesting mix of open access and subscription, depending on the type of article:

From January 2012, all MJA research articles are freely available online. The MJA has a strong commitment to Australian Indigenous health, and makes all Indigenous health articles open access. Other selected articles are also open access, including Editor’s choice articles, guidelines, supplements, obituaries and articles selected by the Editor because of their public health importance. Access to other articles is by subscription. [2]

I'm not sure how Elsevier would maintain this sort of set-up, given their issues with accidentally making articles non-open access when they should be.

[1] https://www.mja.com.au/ "ranked in the top 30 general medical journals in the world." (quote from the publisher's website http://www.ampco.com.au/)
[2] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-05-01/academic-outrage-as-leading-health-journal-editor-sacked/6435850
[3] https://www.mja.com.au/journal/about-us
Leading academics say they are shocked by the removal of the editor of the Medical Journal of Australia.
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Sharing is caring

(the following has been dashed off rather quickly. Suggestions for improvement would be good)

#Elsevier has updated its 'sharing policy' [1]. I like some bits, but others make me pause. I find it amusing that the company is saying to researchers 'you may do this and that', when, in my corner of mathematics at least, we've been doing this for years without need for permission. It feels a bit like catchup to me. But there are other areas of science etc that don't have a culture of this, so it's a new world for them to even think about sharing preprints online.

On the positive side, if you haven't signed #thecostofknowledge boycott and are still publishing with Elsevier, then this is the best point to my mind (not sure if it is new, perhaps +Alicia Wise​ can tell me):

Authors can share their accepted manuscript...Immediately... via their non-commercial personal homepage or blog. [or] by updating a preprint in arXiv or RePEc with the accepted manuscript...
(http://www.elsevier.com/about/policies/article-posting-policy#accepted-manuscript)

This means it is all the more important to actually have a preprint version of the paper on the arXiv (or other public repository). Otherwise one must obey an embargo before posting it there.

What I don't like is this:

In all cases accepted manuscripts should: ...Bear a CC-BY-NC-ND license...
(http://www.elsevier.com/about/policies/article-posting-policy#accepted-manuscript)

Perhaps Elsevier has an argument about applying NC (i.e. non-commercial) if they want exclusive economic rights. But note that at this point one has not signed any contract, so what you do with your manuscript is your own business (unless Elsevier adopts the pernicious policy of having EULA-style 'submit and you agree we own all copyright in the case we accept' terms - which I've seen some publishers use). However, the ND (no derivatives) is a bit flaky, since this basically removes a lot of options for actually making use of the fact it's open access. Suppose I am a non-sighted person without a subscription to some Elsevier journal, and I find the articles on the arXiv. I am unable to convert them to, say, XML+MathML and a form suitable for screen readers etc and post them online for others in my position. Witness the recent controversy about digitising works for the vision impaired. Even the author wouldn't have these rights after signing the copyright to Elsevier and having to abide by the ND clause of her own article.

I know why this is done, since it is to protect Elsevier's commercial interests in, for instance, rights to figures that you might want to reproduce, but in a different form, or to various adaptations that open and sharing academics might want to do. +Peter Murray-Rust​ would be livid I'm sure, since it's taking a free resource (making the big assumption authors used a CC license on the arXiv to start with with) and binding it up.

The funny part is that the arXiv doesn't offer CC-BY-NC-ND in the license metadata, only CC-BY-NC-SA [2]; so it's 'share alike' (the license follows derivatives and redistribution) and not 'no derivatives'. Such a thing -- the ND clause -- would have to be placed in the comments or in the text of the article itself, not very good from a technical perspective, since one can query the arXiv API for license data (+Mike Taylor​ was asking me about this), but making authors add licenses where they will easily be missed is not a smart move. Also, copyright lines cannot be included in the metadata and apparently will be removed! [2] Articles uploaded without Elsevier's chosen license cannot be removed in any case, so if one accidentally uploads an accepted manuscript, good luck in getting it off.

cc: +Scott Morrison​ 

[1] http://www.elsevier.com/connect/elsevier-updates-its-policies-perspectives-and-services-on-article-sharing
[2] http://arxiv.org/help/license

#publishing #openaccess  
<< Open access policies. Elsevier wants to ensure a proper balance between the scholarly rights which authors retain (or are granted/transferred back in some cases) and the rights granted to Elsevier that are necessary to support our mix of business models. We routinely analyze and modify our ...
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What is amusing is that they think they have a right to regulate what the author does to preprints and accepted manuscripts, even before signing the copyright transfer agreement.
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#LHC #13TeV

Just in case, +ATLAS Experiment , just in case :-)
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David Roberts

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More videos!
 
Math Sciences Research Videos from Banff International Research Station


Lecture videos from all areas of the mathematical, computational and statistical sciences from pure and applied mathematics, theoretical and applied computer science, mathematical physics, financial and industrial mathematics, as well as the mathematics of information technology, climate science, mathematical biology and medical science.
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#impactfactor #publishing  

The things we can measure are never exactly what we care about. Just trying to get a single, easy-to-measure number higher and higher (or lower and lower) doesn’t actually help us make the right choice. For this reason, the key question isn’t “What did I measure?” but “What did I miss?”
 
The key question isn’t “What did I measure?” but “What did I miss?”
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For reading later...
 
New Kid in Town: Albatross Proof Assistant

"For those of you who know Coq you might enjoy the capabilities of the proof engine and enjoy the fact that there is no extra proof language and all proofs are expressed by pure statements in predicate logic. Proof automation is done by predicate calculus as well and no by an integrated language like Ltac. Therefore the language is easier to learn than Coq, because every programmer has a well developed intuition about logic."

http://lambda-the-ultimate.org/node/5144

http://albatross-lang.sourceforge.net/
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The mean cited half-life of journals in the Thompson-Reuters Journal Citation Reports classed under 'Mathematics' is 9.9 years. Makes a mockery of even mentioning impact factors for maths journals. As Stephen Curry said: "If you use impact factors you are statistically illiterate" [1]. If you are on an editorial board, push for the publisher etc to sign DORA [2].

http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.07479

[1] http://occamstypewriter.org/scurry/2012/08/13/sick-of-impact-factors/
[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_Declaration_on_Research_Assessment
#dora   #impactfactor #spnetwork arXiv:1504.07479 #bibliometrics #if
Abstract: Analyzing 13455 journals listed in the Journal Citation Report (Thomson Reuters) from 1997 through 2013, we report that the mean cited half-life of the scholarly literature is 6.5 years and growing at a rate of 0.13 years per annum. Focusing on a subset of journals (N=4937) for which ...
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+Jeff Erickson nice one!
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Mathematician, among other things.
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I live in Adelaide, Australia.

I am a pure mathematician who works on category theory and a smattering of related fields such foundations and higher geometry.

I work as a post-doc at the University of Adelaide in the School of Mathematical Sciences.

My nLab page: http://ncatlab.org/nlab/show/David+Roberts
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