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David Roberts
Works at NCVER
Lives in Adelaide, Australia
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David Roberts

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Ambitious, but well-thought out.

+Peter Murray-Rust​ is interested in the extraction of semantics from such poor sources as publishers' pdfs.
 
http://www.abstractmath.org/Word%20Press/?p=9750 A proposal for a repository for proof-checked math
Introduction This post is about taking texts written in mathematical English and the symbolic language and encoding it in a formal language that could be tested by an automated proof verifier. This...
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David Roberts

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The Art of Computer Programming, Vol 4, prefasicle 6a

Don Knuth is slowly releasing drafts of bits of volume 4B (and possibly 4C) of his magnum opus, The Art of Computer Programming, and you can read them and give feedback for a chance of glory and a famous Knuth $2.56 reward. See

http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~uno/news.html

The 'prefasicle' above, 6a, is the draft of section 7.2.2.2 of Volume 4. 

It. Is. 318. Pages. Long.

#Knuuuuuuuuuth  !
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He does say (now) that Vol1-5 are the "core" of the work, and volumes 6 and 7 are "more specialised". Maybe it's for brand recognition?
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Via +Helger Lipmaa​. Note the preprint server!
 
Very interesting: "This paper traces the history of Dual EC including some suspicious changes to the standard, explains how the back door works in real-life applications, and explores the standardization and patent ecosystem in which the standardized back door stayed under the radar."
Cryptology ePrint Archive: Report 2015/767. Dual EC: A Standardized Back Door. Daniel J. Bernstein and Tanja Lange and Ruben Niederhagen. Abstract: Dual EC is an algorithm to compute pseudorandom numbers starting from some random input. Dual EC was standardized by NIST, ANSI, and ISO among other ...
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David Roberts

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The mathematics open access journal landscape

OA activity seems to be growing in mathematics at a fairly healthy rate, 11%-12% for each of the past two years after a 30% jump in 2012.

Hmm, was that the effect of +Timothy Gowers​​ on the OA landscape? [1]

There's also this:

The percentage of free journals is nearly constant and unusually high for STEM, in fact the highest outside of humanities and social sciences—but the percentage of free articles, never a majority, falls significantly over the period, although it’s still higher than most STEM.

[1] https://gowers.wordpress.com/2012/01/21/elsevier-my-part-in-its-downfall/ #thecostofknowledge  
Mathematics includes statistics. The topic includes the highest percentage of no-fee journals outside of the humanities and social sciences, although most articles are in fee-charging journals. In all, there are 228 journals, publishing 13190 articles in 2013 and 14750 in 2014.
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This has been bugging me for ages, and just got around to asking it.

#mathoverflow  
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+John Baez turns out not at all algebraic. The map is at best a map of ind-complex analytic spaces, even though the source and target are ind-varieties.
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Did I share this already? If you play it on your smart phone, you use the motion sensors: it's essentially what's happening in the Occulus version, just not strapped to your face. If you have one of the phones that turns into a VR headset [1], though, I'm sure you could also end up looking like Vi does in the photo below! It's a good party game even without a headset.

Playing on the computer is possible, but less fun.

[1] http://hackaday.com/2014/08/23/smartphone-vr-viewer-roundup/
 
Vi Hart, Andrea Hawksley, Henry Segerman and Marc ten Bosch each independently have long track records of doing crazy, innovative stuff with maths. Together, they’ve made Hypernom.
Vi Hart, Andrea Hawksley, Henry Segerman and Marc ten Bosch each independently have long track records of doing crazy, innovative stuff with maths. Together, they've made Hypernom.
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+Henry Segerman let me play with this at the last JMM! It's always fun to see what Henry and Vi are up to. 
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Milestone crossed! Fewer than 5000 votes needed to get +LEGO to produce an official model of +CERN's Large Hadron Collider!

If you're interested in making this happen, cast your vote at #LEGOideas : https://ideas.lego.com/projects/94885

Read about the project at http://home.web.cern.ch/about/updates/2015/02/build-your-own-tiny-lego-lhc
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I'd love a set of this! If they can make the Big Bang living room set, they can make the LHC.
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http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.00054

Title: Extending homotopy theories from strict maps to lax maps
Authors: Nick Gurski, +Niles Johnson , +Angelica Osorno

Abstract: Constructions of spaces from symmetric monoidal categories or Γ-categories are typically functorial with respect to strict structure-preserving maps, but often the maps of interest are merely lax monoidal or lax natural. We describe conditions under which one can transport the weak equivalences from such a category of structured objects and strict maps to the corresponding category with the same objects and lax maps. Under mild hypotheses this process produces an equivalence of homotopy theories. We describe examples including algebras over an operad, such as symmetric monoidal categories and n-fold monoidal categories; and diagram categories, such as Γ-categories.

#arXiv arXiv:1508.00054
Abstract: Constructions of spaces from symmetric monoidal categories or $\Gamma$-categories are typically functorial with respect to strict structure-preserving maps, but often the maps of interest are merely lax monoidal or lax natural. We describe conditions under which one can transport the ...
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Sounds like an impressively general treatment of 'weakening'!
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Can't remember if I've mentioned this before....
 
If you find yourself wondering where the nForum disappeared to, you should make sure that you are going for the new (as of May this year) url nforum.mathforge.org . This is due to the migration of both the nLab and the nForum to a server hosted at CMU and now paid for by the HoTT-MURI [1]. Until recently the old url redirected to the new one, but maybe not anymore. 

[1] http://homotopytypetheory.org/2014/04/29/hott-awarded-a-muri/
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Actually, there's a slip of the fingers above: the new URL is not the mathforge domain (that's the old one) but the ncatlab domain.
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The nLab is a bit like this, minus the actual journal bit. Actually, there -was a journal project, but it stalled after two papers for reasons not quite clear, most likely that people don't get magical career beans for publishing in an innovative online platform run by scholars, at least in mathematics...

http://blog.scholasticahq.com/post/125481737433/from-collaborative-open-peer-review-to-html
Image: Hybrid Pedagogy journal Since the journal’s inception in 2011, the creators of Hybrid Pedagogy have sought to foster a new approach to scholarly communication, peer review, and open access...
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David Roberts

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That's a lot of mathematicians!

Keith Alexander (then director of the NSA) stated that the NSA employed 1013 mathematicians and that they were the largest employer of mathematicians in the USA. He didn’t elaborate on what he meant by “mathematician”.
Over the years the NSF has financed various summer camps for high school students, designed to get them interested in mathematics or other areas of science. This summer they've teamed up with the NSA to deal with the problem of bad press due to the Snowden revelations by organizing a massive new ...
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Have him in circles
19,217 people
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  • NCVER
    present
  • University of Adelaide
    2012 - 2015
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Mathematician, among other things.
Introduction
I live in Adelaide, Australia.

I am a pure mathematician who works on category theory and a smattering of related fields such foundations and higher geometry.

I works as a data analyst, of sorts, at the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (all views expressed here are my own).

I am a visiting fellow in the School of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Adelaide.

My nLab page: http://ncatlab.org/nlab/show/David+Roberts
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