Profile

Cover photo
David Perry
Works at MasterCoin
Attended University of Phoenix
Lives in Las Vegas, NV
582 followers|164,543 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTubeReviews

Stream

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
"C# is a powerful laser rifle strapped to a donkey, when taken off the donkey the laser doesn’t seem to work as well."
 
"#C is an M1 Garand standard issue rifle, old but reliable... #Perl is a molotov cocktail, it was probably useful once, but few people use it now. #JavaScript is a sword without a hilt."
C is an M1 Garand standard issue rifle, old but reliable. C++ is a set of nunchuks, powerful and impressive when wielded but takes many years of pain to master and often you probably wish you were using something else. Perl is a molotov cocktail,... | Bjorn Tipling | Software Engineer at @floobits
3 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
Never thought of it this way but sure, I'll say I'm proud to be a white blood cell.
 
“Access to information is a critical currency of power.”
The beauty of hackers, says cybersecurity expert Keren Elazari, is that they force us to evolve and improve. Yes, some hackers are bad guys, but many are working to fight government corruption and advocate for our rights. By exposing vulnerabilities, they push the Internet to become stronger and healthier, wielding their power to create a better world.
4 comments on original post
4
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
Finally got tired enough of unplugging a million things to do something about it. I got Thunderbolt to HDMI adapters for both monitors, a nice beefy USB hub and a simple audio splitter and mashed 'em all together with +sugru. The result is one giant meta-plug that I can connect and disconnect all at once. It works surprisingly well.
5
Jan Jenko's profile photoNathan Stoltenberg's profile photoDavid Perry's profile photo
4 comments
 
Most docking stations made for PC don't work on Mac at all. This is primarily because USB to HDMI adapters have their own video chip onboard and Mac doesn't have drivers for that chip. This means if I bought a PC docking station I'd still have to add two more thunderbolt cables for video. No bueno.

There are a few third-party docking stations that take the same approach as the sugru hack, multiple plugs carefully aligned, but this is one of the late 2013 macbook pros. It's new and it's different: It has different port placement, even a different magsafe power adapter - and most third party hardware manufacturers haven't caught up yet. There are painfully few docks available and most of them are designed to hold a closed vertical macbook where I want my macbook open and horizontal to be used as a 3rd monitor.

Realistically, what this is replacing is about $2,000 worth of proprietary Apple monitors. The thunderbolt-powered $1,000 cinema display has its own USB chain and audio onboard and offers tbolt passthrough so you can daisy chain two or more monitors. The intent is that you're going to buy two of those, chain them together and end up plugging in one tbolt cable to the macbook itself.

Because Apple has provided an official "solution" for folks with thousands of dollars to spend no one really bothers trying to make a proper solution for folks with maybe tens or even a couple hundred to spend.
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
Why is the idea of teaching kids the underlying concepts behind math controversial? Sure, little Timmy needs to learn the algorithm this guy used to arrive at the answer quickly, but what good is memorizing an algorithm if you don't actually understand what it's doing? Teaching rote memorization of algorithms is a great way to ensure kids are confused as hell when they reach calculus.
 
Common Core Epic Fail!
#geekhumor   #math   #mathematics  

Also see appended edited comment below.

One father, who has an advanced engineering degree, couldn't figure out the approach used to calculate a math problem presented on his son's elementary homework assignment: “Jack used the number line below to solve 427 – 316. Find his error. Then write a letter to Jack telling him what he did right, and what he should do to fix his mistake.”

“Dear Jack, Don’t feel bad. I have a Bachelor of Science Degree in Electronics Engineering, which included extensive study in differential equations and other higher math applications. Even I cannot explain the Common Core mathematics approach, nor get the answer correct. In the real world, simplification is valued over complication. Therefore, 427 - 316 = 111. The answer is solved in under 5 seconds — 111. The process used is ridiculous and would result in termination if used. Sincerely, Frustrated Parent.”

Edited: I posted this as a silly joke I've seen floating around Facebook, but it's turned out to be an annoying political kind of serious debate issue, it seems. So I'll qualify this with a serious comment as well. Btw, it may just be an urban legend -- and it might not have anything to do with actual 'Common Core' curriculum problems.

First, I think teaching difference (or sum) of numbers as distance is useful, and in general anytime you can visualize something abstract in a concrete geometric way, you can get a better intuitive understanding of what the math is actual doing. This particular one isn't to scale. Btw, the error is obvious to me instantly: he forgot to count off the 1 ten and skipped it, and just subtracted the hundreds and the six ones, and so was off by 10 in the end, so he got 121 instead of the correct 111.  

I've taught negative numbers to 2nd graders by introducing them to vectors. One girl showed me a proof of how 3-5 was impossible: she put three of her pencils on her desk, and said, "I can take away one; I can take away 2; and I can take away all 3; but I can't take away 5 pencils when I start with 3 pencils. It's downright impossible." (Boy I wish I had a video of this to post to youtube -- she was awesome. )

So I responded that was a wonderful proof; but that the reason you don't hear older kids say "take away" and say "minus" instead, is that subtraction isn't really taking away -- rather, it's moving left on the number line. So I showed them that if you add, you can put arrows head to tail of the two numbers you are adding, and at the end is the sum. And subtracting, you are adding a "minus number" that points the other way. So I had her, and all of them try it again, on the number line on their desks. They complained, "but the number line stops at zero!" And I said, "in kindergarten, then don't even have a zero -- their number lines start with 1. Well, this is the real answer -- we extend the number line left, just as we do to the right, and now we have answers to all these kinds of problems."

And so that same girl did a new proof: "Ok, I draw an arrow to the right 3 spaces; and then at the pointy end of that arrow I draw an arrow pointing left 5 spaces for 'minus 5' and then at the end it's 'negative 2'. That's the answer." And I said, "you got it!" 

Hence, if the illustration is clear and understandable, I think the geometric version gives an intuitive sense of what you're doing. 'Upgrading' that little girl's (and her classmates') algorithm for subtracting was crucial to her intuitive understanding. That's what this pic is also trying to do, but it's just a bit confusing, that's all. The point of the visualization is to give you an understanding how the mat works: you don't want to solve problems that way. In general, I think that if you can demonstrate a visual proof of an arithmetic or algebraic equation, you can get kids to 'grok' what's going on much better. Btw, I also introduced them to multiplication as adding in two directions, making a rectangle, and then counting up the squares in the rectangle. Worked great. But again, that's a visual tool to sharpen intuitions; you wouldn't ever rely on solving problems that way, either.
276 comments on original post
4
1
Steve Law's profile photoIllutian Kade's profile photoDavid Perry's profile photoPhil Balanga's profile photo
11 comments
 
There will probably end up being an awkward interim during which they'll have to teach both. I feel bad for THOSE kids... Imagine the homework... 
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
So this one's been making the rounds again. Want to know why it's nonsense and you shouldn't waste your time arguing about proper comma use?

Examine the following counter-argument:

"We invited the stripper, JFK, and Stalin."

"We invited the stripper, JFK and Stalin."

The first, "correctly" using the Oxford comma makes it appear that you sent invitations to a stripper named JFK as well as Stalin. This is because of the comma's vaguely defined use in English as a delineator and separator of all things.

The humorous "problems" often shown as examples of why one or the other method is correct are in reality just examples of very poorly formed sentences which should have their structure, not their comma use, repaired. The following is clearer than the above examples regardless of whether the serial comma is included:

"We invited JFK, Stalin[,] and the strippers."

As someone who most often writes for journalistic publications rather than scientific ones, the style guides I'm held to require the omission of the serial comma and I'm happy to report that with only a modicum of care taken in my sentence structure it has never once caused any confusion.

Use or omission of serial commas is a stylistic choice, not a grammatical one.
5
2
Illutian Kade's profile photoSteve Law's profile photoDarrell Becker's profile photo
5 comments
 
+Steven Law If knowledge is understanding. And learning is understanding.

Then to be misunderstood is to be undefinable.

:P
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
582 people
Dan-el Perry's profile photo
Elle Bee's profile photo
Joseph Smalec's profile photo
Kramer Dean's profile photo
Alaric Snell-Pym's profile photo
Дмитрий Волошин's profile photo
Seth Otterstad's profile photo
best-miner's profile photo
Barbara Messer's profile photo

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
Question for other programmers with healthy meeting-avoidance habits: I keep trying to keep meetings short and sweet by keeping spoken content vague and high-level and requesting specifics in email followups, but so far I've only managed to get ONE email followup ever.

I'm usually playing some kind of support role and my ability to help this team depends on me knowing what kind of help they actually need - but I just can't spend all day hunting people down in IRC, Skype etc just to get an answer I've already asked them for.

What do you do to encourage email followups to actually happen?
1
Greg Stockton's profile photo
 
While I don't know the full context, I am not sure I agree with the initial premise.

Certainly, many meetings are best avoided--or dialed into with half an ear while working on real work.

But a meeting of "we are here to discuss YOUR issues, any context or aspects to the problem that aren't obvious" can be incredibly valuable.

Just as Powerpoints are best avoided, but a one page slide can sometimes move conversations ahead by days.

They are both tools, and should be used when they are the best tool for the job.

But...to answer how I ensure follow-ups...I send emails proactively after the meeting either reminding them that they owe me an answer, or summarizing the problem as I understand it--then asking for the information I want.

I also build relationships with people--"cred" as it were. If you provide me with this then I"ll be better able to provide you with results in return.
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
Because what are they gonna do, tear gas an old man in a wheelchair?
1
Illutian Kade's profile photo
 
In this day and age...probably shoot him and claim he had a deadly weapon [the wheelchair].
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
Well I feel like an idiot. All these years I've been playing +Minecraft all the lava-induced deaths and creeper-based structure damage... All this time I've been wishing for a "save game" button or some kind of checkpoint feature and I just found it, already installed on my computer, mocking me with its obviousness. I have now versioned my Minecraft worlds with Git.
1
Arturo Earle's profile photo
 
genius
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
DAMN STRAIGHT.
8
1
Shawn S's profile photo
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
2
1
Illutian Kade's profile photoDaniel Link's profile photo
 
How true.
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
Just found 245 mBTC in some paper wallets while cleaning out my desk upstairs. For a moment I thought I'd found a much older stash that I'd somehow forgotten. Sadly no #Bitcoin  lottery was won today, but I'll take the equivalent of finding $100 in my jacket pocket any time.
7
Steve Law's profile photo
 
Hang on to it for a while.
Add a comment...

David Perry

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hey everyone, I was just on the local news talking #Bitcoin ! Not a bad piece either, fair and reasonably well-informed.
LAS VEGAS -- A digital currency known as Bitcoin is on a roller-coaster ride. Central banks in both China and Russia have recently announced that they won't accept Bitcoin transactions, and in the U.S.,More>>
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
582 people
Dan-el Perry's profile photo
Elle Bee's profile photo
Joseph Smalec's profile photo
Kramer Dean's profile photo
Alaric Snell-Pym's profile photo
Дмитрий Волошин's profile photo
Seth Otterstad's profile photo
best-miner's profile photo
Barbara Messer's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Full-Stack Web Developer
Skills
From server administration on the far-backend to web design and UX on the far-frontend and at every layer between I just about do it all. A decent programmer should value their ability to learn new things as well as practice the old.
Employment
  • MasterCoin
    Chief Architect, present
  • CoinReporting
    Senior Developer, present
  • Memory Dealers / BitcoinStore.com
    Chief Architect
  • Aristocrat Leisure Limited
    Tech Services, Level III
  • TechWorks
    Technical Support
  • Verifone
  • Citicorp
  • United Coin Machine Co. Inc.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Las Vegas, NV
Previously
Redlands, CA - Yucaipa, CA - St. Petersburg, FL - Victorville, CA
Story
Tagline
Giant nerd. Avid programmer. Bitcoin enthusiast.
Introduction
Most kids "know" what they want to be when they grow up. As evidenced by the relatively low number of firefighters and astronauts, this doesn't always work out. Sometimes, though, your dad slides a 5.25" floppy disk labeled "GW-Basic" into a hand-me-down 286 and the rest is history.

I've always known that in some way I was born to build systems, write code and generally reduce big complex systems to small implementable steps - and then implement them.

These days I run as close to full-stack as anyone can typically claim. From server admin tasks to UX/UI and everything inbetween.

I also make a habit of saying yes to projects that seem well above my pay grade. Most of the time it turns out they're only difficult in your head and the only thing holding you back is disbelief in your ability to grow.

Recently I've started working more heavily with Bitcoin-related projects. Having written code in the past for Verifone, Citi and Aristocrat (a large slot machine manufacturer) any kind of work in finance is a natural extension. Having specialized in security and cryptography for some of the aforementioned, Bitcoin is likewise a natural choice.
Bragging rights
I once implemented the Sieve of Eratosthenes in SQL. Life was very boring before Bitcoin.
Education
  • University of Phoenix
    Associates of Science, Information Technology, 2010 - 2011
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Networking
Relationship
Married
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
This place knows their way around the spice cabinet - best comfort food EVER.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
4 reviews
Map
Map
Map