Profile

Cover photo
David Pearce
15,228 followers
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
The NU Study Group have released the Negative Utilitarianism FAQ. 
http://www.utilitarianism.com/nu/nufaq.html
Negative Utilitarianism FAQ. ABSTRACT. "Negative" views in population ethics are views that don't place any (strong) importance on adding new happy individuals to the world. This FAQ covers both negative preference utilitarianism (NPU) and negative hedonistic utilitarianism (NHU).
1
David Pearce's profile photo
 
No, not one of my hats, tough I know and admire the authors. We agree that a commitment to reduce, prevent and ultimately (ideally) abolish involuntary suffering is consistent with a diversity of value systems, not all of which give overriding ethical importance - or even prioritise - phasing out suffering. But it's good to see NU receiving sustained scrutiny.



(My own musings on NU and CU:

http://www.hedweb.com/social-media/pre2014.html)
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
Effective Altruism Global, Melbourne (14 - 16 August). What topics would you like us to tackle?
http://www.eaglobal.org/melbourne/
3
1
David Pearce's profile photoMagnus Vinding's profile photoDavid Pearce's profile photoMira Kwak's profile photo
11 comments
 
+Magnus Vinding, I believe there will shortly be a video upload of my discussion with Peter Singer over the future of predation (and the possible apocalyptic implications of CU).
http://www.david-pearce.com/melbourne-ea2015aug.html
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
4
David Pearce's profile photoFiliapolis EN's profile photo
2 comments
 
It seems the experience machine's design would be a rather important thing to be described prior to asking the question. Let us suppose, to bolster Nozick's argument, that the machine is set to deliver maximum, unending pleasure (and not merely a matrix style Tahitian beach, or whatever barely improved setting people generally conceptualize as paradise).

Such a machine would necessarily capture 100% of the subject's attention, of the subject's consciousness, 100% of the time, drowning the mere possibility of thoughts in a flood of stimuli.

This is a situation we normally find ourselves in only briefly, in fleeting and rare moments of ecstasy (and these moments may not be as intense as what is being produced by the machine). Making it a permanent fixture of our experience of life necessarily comes at the expense of all others.

Pleasure or pain. Pleasure or curiosity. Pleasure or nostalgia. Pleasure or love. Pleasure or thought.

A human being incapable of experiencing anything else (the machine rendering the relevant neuronal clusters useless and idle) can hardly be called human. A human being ceasing to be a human being can hardly be called the same person.

The loss of personal identity is in our view reason enough to refuse stepping into a machine designed as per the above. Something else will benefit from the experience, hence the whole enterprise is pointless (if removed from the machine after some time) or worse, akin to suicide (if the arrangement becomes permanent - or hinges on the subject choosing to leave it, which is nothing short of impossible once turned on).

Such an experience machine cannot be designed to serve humans. A matrix style virtual reality machine on the other hand can be wholly compatible, and is indeed preferable to unedited reality.

Note: there is here the very real possibility for a slippery slope, starting from barely improved reality and gradually morphing into the experience machine. The point at which personal identity ceases to continue is of course arbitrary, and may subjectively not matter anyway depending on the pace of change.
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
Does the quantum analogue of the Library of Babel stock the key to its own existence?
http://www.quora.com/Why-does-anything-exist-1
4
3
Tory Wright's profile photoDarius Gabriel Constantine's profile photoChannin Smith's profile photoDaniel Bastian's profile photo
12 comments
 
+David Pearce You're right. Not having all of the answers is no reason to abandon the few axioms we do have. Emergence may dictate that the answers are subject to change as well as being intractable. Maybe we are imposing ontology on nature. Why not 42?  :-)
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
"If he belongs behind bars, then so do most Americans." Factory-farming and slaughterhouses are crimes against sentience.
http://www.vox.com/2015/7/30/9074547/cecil-lion-chicken-meat/in/5654656
If he belongs behind bars, then so do most Americans.
10
Darius Gabriel Constantine's profile photoTory Wright's profile photoWilliam Bliss's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Tory Wright Yep, and lambs are treated even worse. Let's move quickly to non sentient sources of animal tissue, and preserve the habitats necessary for biodiversity.
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hormone therapy for the morally disabled? One day perhaps...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150728110809.htm
5
1
Patrick Hutton's profile photoNick Benik (HackerCEO)'s profile photo
 
No way! That is sick.  
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
Should we aim to conserve, recalibrate or abolish the hedonic treadmill?
http://www.raredr.com/publications/rare-disease-report/2015/Sept-2015/Locked-In-Syndrome-QoL
While patients with stable LIS can enjoy a longer life, the question addressed in a new study is—do the patients appreciate that life since it is spent in a highly conscious but paralyzed state with limited ability to communicate? According to the study, the answer is yes.
3
1
William Bliss's profile photoDavid Pearce's profile photoDean Amine's profile photoAlexander Nikitin's profile photo
4 comments
 
People seem to also observe that the sustained use of any drug will eventually become a new normal. I guess there is always some equilibration but not complete?
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
15,228 people
Jon Croonenberghs's profile photo
Kevin Potter's profile photo
Tyler Benson's profile photo
Mark Wheeler's profile photo
Steven Fields's profile photo
Joshua Best's profile photo
Neemo Tawasha's profile photo
Adam Ellis's profile photo
Georgiana Radu's profile photo

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
4
2
Darius Gabriel Constantine's profile photoMary Paniscus's profile photoWayne Eddy's profile photoJessica Meyer's profile photo
7 comments
 
yes invitro meat ftw! seriously that's when we'll finally think its barbaric to kill an animal for meat.
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
I've never really understood why the long-term goal of phasing out involuntary suffering isn't regarded as a platitude. https://www.reddit.com/r/askphilosophy/comments/3fkfht/what_would_the_best_of_all_possible_worlds/
6
David Pearce's profile photoPeter Duodo's profile photo
3 comments
 
Hi boss good morning hw are you am call peter and you am Ghanaian and you 
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
Will posthuman superintelligence more closely resemble super-Aspergers or Super-Empaths?
http://boston.cbslocal.com/2015/07/27/boston-neurologist-can-feel-patients-pain/
A neurologist at Mass General Hospital can connect with patients on a level most cannot.
4
3
Quantum Paradigm's profile photoJohn Hewitt's profile photo
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
Will posthuman superintelligence be sociopathic or psychopathic?
Or Super-Buddhas?
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/the-difference-between-a-psychopath-and-a-sociopath-10422016.html
Psychopath and sociopath are popular psychology terms to describe violent monsters born of our worst nightmares. Think Hannibal Lecter in Silence of the Lambs (1991), Norman Bates in Psycho (1960) and Annie Wilkes in Misery (1990). In making these characters famous, popular culture has also burned the words used to describe them into our collective consciousness.
7
LL Pete's profile photoCM Stewart's profile photoXenophrenia's profile photo
3 comments
 
funny - in a the psych literature I've ever seen they are both the same ...
Add a comment...

David Pearce

Shared publicly  - 
 
Can we build an advanced civilisation where reality conspires to help you?
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-do-some-people-believe-in-conspiracy-theories/
4
1
René Milan's profile photoTory Wright's profile photoDarius Gabriel Constantine's profile photoNick Benik (HackerCEO)'s profile photo
6 comments
 
The "truest" conspiracy theory I ever found was Silent Weapons for Quiet Wars, because even if it is complete fiction, even if it is a forgery (and there are plenty theories that it is), the process it describes is almost an entirely accurate representation of what is actually going on in the world.

It could be classified as fiction non-fiction, I suppose - because the world it describes looks exactly like the one I live in.

http://www.lawfulpath.com/ref/sw4qw/index.shtml
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
15,228 people
Jon Croonenberghs's profile photo
Kevin Potter's profile photo
Tyler Benson's profile photo
Mark Wheeler's profile photo
Steven Fields's profile photo
Joshua Best's profile photo
Neemo Tawasha's profile photo
Adam Ellis's profile photo
Georgiana Radu's profile photo
Story
Tagline
Paradise Engineering.
Links