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David Morris
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enterprise agile coach, governance consultant, speaker, product owner, business designer
enterprise agile coach, governance consultant, speaker, product owner, business designer

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David Morris commented on a post on Blogger.
A good summation and matching much of my early masters research too. However I found the most interesting and compelling realisation was that all these scaled approaches (including the newer Nexus) arise from product development team methods, so are not necessarily attuned to the purposes of executive or operational functions. The mindset and some of the principles transfer. However, I feel we need to fresh think about what whole organisations need, and then work that in toward the team practices, to see where the connections are and where the necessary differences are too. I am embarking on the preparation to start a PHD on the basis of my masters (for which I got a very pleasing A+), so would be happy to talk more about this.
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David Morris commented on a post on Blogger.
Refreshing to hear someone else proclaiming that 'agile' is an adjective not a noun or an entity/deity (with the all too frequent capital 'A'). Effectively any role, function, or process can become agile by applying the principles and values ... however some lend themselves to this more than others. 

I always say that agile practices were not a revolution 20 years ago, they were an evolution based on what was good practice at the time. Good project managers would avoid command and control and trust that the team were professionals and let them get on with their job as they knew how, only intervening when requested or needed - i.e. they behaved as a servant / leader.

This is as possible today as it was 20+ years ago, however too many professionals get bogged down in the minutiae of their role descriptions and are hampered by non-agile organisations / governance that drives them towards what we have come to know as agile anti-patterns. 
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