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David McRaney
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David McRaney

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Zoolander 2 is out there, being a movie, kinda sorta on my radar, in my peripheral - and then I see a review headline that mentions the first Zoolander came out 15 years ago; I clumsily put down my phone as I stare into the distance, thoughts of time's incessant march masked by an incredulous Blue Steel.
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Listen as three experts in logic and arguing explain just what a formal argument really is, and how to spot, avoid, and defend against the one logical fallacy that is most likely to turn you into an internet blowhard.

Link: http://youarenotsosmart.com/2016/01/22/yanss-067-the-fallacy-fallacy/
If you have ever shared an opinion on the internet, you have probably been in an internet argument, and if you have been in enough internet arguments you have likely been called out for committing ...
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Bertrand Russell once wrote: “The observer, when he seems to himself to be observing a stone, is really, if physics is to be believed, observing the effects of the stone upon himself.”

YANSS 062 - Naive Realism - Lee Ross: http://bit.ly/1GTzNfu
In psychology they call thinking that you see the world as it truly is, free from bias or the limitations of your senses, naive realism. According to our guest in this episode, famed psychologist L...
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According to guests Michael and Sarah Bennett, obsessively trying to control your feelings can lead to self-loathing, ineffectual strategies for change, and lives filled with missed opportunities and squandered productivity.

059 - The Illusion of Control - Michael and Sarah Bennett: http://bit.ly/1PgLTl1
Over the years, when most patients have first met psychiatrist Michael I. Bennett, they have tended to believe they would soon to get to know a trusted confidant who would sit quietly, listen inten...
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What can magicians, con-artists, and scammers teach us about how to be better critical thinkers? According to Brian Brushwood, a whole lot. Learn more in the latest episode...

YANSS 056 - Magicians and Scams: http://bit.ly/1MxCXXp
Before we had names for them or a science to study their impact, the people who could claim the most expertise on biases, fallacies, heuristics and all the other recently popularized quirks of huma...
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Is psychology too WEIRD? Listen as psychologist Steven J. Heine explains how culturally narrow the study of the human mind has become over the years, and what scientists are doing about it.
YANSS 055 - WEIRD People - http://bit.ly/1DnEKLR
Is psychology too WEIRD? That's what this episode's guest, psychologist Steven J. Heine, suggested when he and his colleagues published a paper revealing that psychology wasn't the study of the hum...
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In the latest episode we explore new research that suggests the more you use Google the smarter you feel - even in those moments in which you no longer have access to the internet.

YANSS 063 - The Search Effect - Matthew Fisher: http://bit.ly/1Ohd8ew

You've likely wondered if the internet is having a negative effect on your brain. Perhaps you've thought this after realizing the world wide web now serves as a trusty resource when gaps in your kn...
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When I first walked into the Book Rack in midtown Hattiesburg yesterday, the smell of 44-years worth of used books, thousands of them, hooked my nose and dragged me back to when my mom would take me along with her to trade-in a giant stack of romance novels for a slightly smaller stack of unread ones.

Cathy Cook was there when I was a boy, offering small talk to my mom and tallying up the exchange rate. She was there on Monday too, sitting in her chair above the rust-colored carpets, telling me about a lifetime of buying and selling used books surrounded by the light salmon wooden shelves her father built and painted when she was 19-years-old.

When Cook graduated high school, she decided she would follow in her father's footsteps and open a Book Rack like he had done in Memphis when she was a little girl. She trained at the corporate headquarters, and then in 1971 staked a claim in Hattiesburg next door to the Hobby Center, the city's only comic-book, plastic model, D&D, and general geekery shop for decades.

"This used to be the happening part of town," she told me from her nest of books and paperwork at the front of the store, seemingly unchanged except for the order and publishing dates since I last visited a few years back, and a few years before that, and the 20 before those.

After a few successful years she bought a small house a street-and-a-half away, filled it with book shelves and books, and has been keeping regular hours there ever since.

Today, that part of town is a mix of new businesses and old situated between the hipster rebirth of downtown to the east and franchise-stuffed cookie-cutter west. The Hobby Shop closed down a few years ago. The old movie theater is now a Lazer Mania. The Book Rack sits behind a bank, near an auto repair shop and an electrical supply warehouse, indistinguishable from the other houses in the neighborhood except for the giant black on white wooden sign fastened to the roof with BOOK RACK rising above a tree that threatens to obscure the OOs.

Two potted plants live near a yellow rocking chair on the tiny front porch sitting on some weathered green astroturf. A bell clangs when you pull open the single front door, and then that wonderful backdraft of a million inked letters on thousands of aging paper pages rushes past you.

When I was a boy, I would dart straight to the back to dig through the science fiction novels. I loved the 1970s artwork, the promise of a space age in the wake of actually landing real spaceships on the moon. I remember marveling at the farms floating above planets, teams of explorers walking down planks to press human bootprints on distant sands. My mom would wander the romance novel wing, a section of the store that still takes up a quarter of the old house.

"Do you have a card?" I asked. Cook fumbled around her book cocoon until she fished out a home-printed blue bookmark stamped with the address and phone number. With some surprise she told me, "This is all we have. We're so cheap. Sorry. Money is tight. You know, when I first got into this business they all said it was depression-proof."

Cook explained that the promise had proved correct. She could see retirement on the horizon as she neared 50 years in Hattiesburg peddling mysteries and Westerns, thrillers and several generations of diet fad instruction manuals. "Then about four or five years ago the Kindle came out, and the iPad," she said, explaining that E-books had always seemed like a niche novelty until then. "Some of my best customers stopped coming in."

There's enough business to stay afloat for a while, said Cook, maybe, but not enough to keep two locations open, which she attempted for a few years until a few of those old sci-fi predictions finally came true and made paper books, the kind that produced the beautiful clutter of her life's work, a newly discovered nuisance.

At its peak, the Book Rack boasted 200 locations across the country, mostly in the middle. Today there are fewer than 50, said Cook. Of the original 12, the Hattiesburg location is one of three still in business.

"People come in all the time and tell me they remember coming here as kids," she said, adding that they often mention they came curious to see if she and the books and the shelves and the carpet and all the rest was still there. I didn't admit that had been my curiosity as well.
I handed over a political science book, maybe two years old, a book on nature vs. nurture from the 1990s, and one 1970s science fiction novel. Eight dollars.

"You know, I think I'll come by next week and drop off some books," I told her as she bagged up my haul.

"I'll be here."
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David McRaney

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According to guests Michael and Sarah Bennett, obsessively trying to control your feelings can lead to self-loathing, ineffectual strategies for change, and lives filled with missed opportunities and squandered productivity.

059 - The Illusion of Control - Michael and Sarah Bennett: http://bit.ly/1PgLTl1
Over the years, when most patients have first met psychiatrist Michael I. Bennett, they have tended to believe they would soon to get to know a trusted confidant who would sit quietly, listen inten...
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Final Week to Support The A to Z Guide to Jobs for Girls!
http://kck.st/1O4qqrY
Stretch Goal Announcement: If the campaign total reaches $10,000, I will add feathers to this otherwise scientifically accurate dinosaur. The campaign ends this Friday. Please ask your celebrity blogger friends to share the link. Thank you!
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Have him in circles
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Basic Information
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Male
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Tagline
Wordsmith, Technomancer, Psychonaut
Introduction
David McRaney is a journalist who created the blog You Are Not So Smart where he began writing regularly about the psychology behind common biases, delusions, heuristics, and fallacies in 2009. That blog became an internationally bestselling book published by Penguin/Gotham in 2011, now available in 14 languages. His second book, You Are Now Less Dumb, was released in July of 2013, also published by Penguin/Gotham.

David currently hosts a podcast that is part of the Boing Boing podcasting family soon to be available on Sirius/XM radio and on Virgin Airlines, and he travels around the planet giving lectures on the topics he covers in his books, blog, and podcast.

David graduated with a degree in journalism from The University of Southern Mississippi where he served as editor of the college newspaper and was named one of the top 10 college journalists in the United States by the Scripps Howard Foundation in addition to winning two William Randolph Hearst awards, one for feature writing and one for opinion writing. Before that, he tried waiting tables, working construction, selling leather coats, building and installing electrical control panels, and owning pet stores.

David cut his teeth covering Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast and in the Pine Belt region of the Deep South. Since then, he has been a beat reporter, an editor, a photographer, voiceover artist, television host, and everything in between. His writing work has been featured at The Atlantic, The New York Post, Lifehacker, Gawker, Boing Boing, among many other places. He is now employed as a digital media director with Raycom Media for WDAM-TV where he also produced The Green Couch Sessions, a television show focusing on the music of the Deep South.

He is married to Amanda McRaney, and they live in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.
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Wordsmith, Technomancer, Psychonaut