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David Loring
Attends Earlham College
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A nice old Nova I spotted in the Walmart parking lot.
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This article, and a lot of writing on this subject, veers off into denigrating the maturity of college students and thus misses what the author would probably find a more interesting and worrisome perspective: the ethics that is responsible for protests against stuff like "american sniper" is not an immature one that would, if practiced more accurately result in respect for freedom of speech. It is a mature ethics that emphasizes and politicizes the consequences of all actions, including speech.It is, as such, fundamentally and consciously in tension with freedom of speech, because it is unable to ignore or render justified the harm that speech is capable of causing any more than it can the harm of any other action. College students may or may not be more mature than they once were, but this critique of liberal free speech is far more than mere childishness.
 
In a mature environment, humans often opt to simply shake off acts of political correctness or incorrectness. But while today’s college campus is many things, mature it is not.
Yes, it’s political correctness run amok. But it’s more than that. Campuses are grooming whiners because they aren’t nurturing citizens.
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Why is donating money to a police department anything other than bribery?
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Because maybe the money they receive isn't incentive to give special treatment to the person who donated it, but merely funds they need to do their job better? Maybe you could make an anonymous donation, just to ensure that you don't get special treatment and eliminate the possibility of it being interpreted as bribery? I mean, as long as it's not a person going "hey if you let me out of this traffic ticket I'll anonymously donate a lot of money to your department"...it needs to not be a conditional donation.
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I built a quadcopter in Besiege, and learned why they are invariably controlled by computers.
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In 30 years we'll look back on the singularity institute like we now look back on Crowley, Parsons, Hubbard, and the OTO.
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Today in History

On this day in 1954, a group of children from Arsenal Elementary School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, receive the first injections of the new polio vaccine developed by Dr. Jonas Salk.

Though not as devastating as the plague or influenza, poliomyelitis was a highly contagious disease that emerged in terrifying outbreaks and seemed impossible to stop. Attacking the nerve cells and sometimes the central nervous system, polio caused muscle deterioration, paralysis and even death. Even as medicine vastly improved in the first half of the 20th century in the Western world, polio still struck, affecting mostly children but sometimes adults as well. The most famous victim of a 1921 outbreak in America was future President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, then a young politician. The disease spread quickly, leaving his legs permanently paralyzed.

In the late 1940s, the March of Dimes, a grassroots organization founded with President Roosevelt's help to find a way to defend against polio, enlisted Dr. Jonas Salk, head of the Virus Research Lab at the University of Pittsburgh. Salk found that polio had as many as 125 strains of three basic types, and that an effective vaccine needed to combat all three. By growing samples of the polio virus and then deactivating, or "killing" them by adding a chemical called formalin, Salk developed his vaccine, which was able to immunize without infecting the patient.

After mass inoculations began in 1954, everyone marveled at the high success rate--some 60-70 percent--until the vaccine caused a sudden outbreak of some 200 cases. After it was determined that the cases were all caused by one faulty batch of the vaccine, production standards were improved, and by August 1955 some 4 million shots had been given. Cases of polio in the U.S. dropped from 14,647 in 1955 to 5,894 in 1956, and by 1959 some 90 other countries were using Salk's vaccine.   

A later version of the polio vaccine, developed by Albert Sabin, used a weakened form of the live virus and was swallowed instead of injected. It was licensed in 1962 and soon became more popular than Salk's vaccine, as it was cheaper to make and easier for people to take. There is still no cure for polio once it has been contracted, but the use of vaccines has virtually eliminated polio in the United States. Globally, there are now around 250,000 cases each year, mostly in developing countries. The World Health Organization has set a goal of eradicating polio from the entire world by 2010.

|| +Amazing things in the world 
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I'm just going to leave this absolutely gobsmacking abstract here. It's always fascinating when some piece of neurological architecture has been clearly press-ganged into supporting some computationally related but conceptually dissimilar mechanism. 

In this case, it appears that the same architecture used for processing physical discomfort is also involved in processing violations of conceptual boundaries. From the abstract:

The meaning-maintenance model posits that any violation of expectations leads to an affective experience that motivates compensatory affirmation. We explore whether the neural mechanism that responds to meaning threats can be inhibited by acetaminophen, in the same way that acetaminophen inhibits physical pain or the distress caused by social rejection. In two studies, participants received either acetaminophen or a placebo and were provided with either an unsettling experience or a control experience. In Study 1, participants wrote about either their death or a control topic. In Study 2, participants watched either a surrealist film clip or a control film clip. In both studies, participants in the meaning-threat condition who had taken a placebo showed typical compensatory affirmations by becoming more punitive toward lawbreakers, whereas those who had taken acetaminophen, and those in the control conditions, did not.
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It's surreal to combine such an experienced narrator with such completely amateurish production values.
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Really could have been titled "Portrait of a Billion-dollar Manchild".
The credo of Thiel’s venture-capital firm: “We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters.” Credit Photograph by Robert Maxwell
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Leonard Nimoy's (ז"ל) last tweet, from a few days ago: a perfect capsule of the things which made him so dear to so many people's hearts, and a fitting epitaph.
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Have him in circles
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molly bargar's profile photo
Brian “Psychochild” Green's profile photo
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  • Earlham College
    Biochemistry, 2010 - present
  • Eureka High School
    2005 - 2009
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Authentic Chinese food. Excellently spiced, good quality for the price. The ingredients are not the best but that makes sense given the price. Spicy here is spicy, beware of your tongue. But I have nothing to complain about!
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Quality: ExcellentAppeal: Very GoodService: Good
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