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David Grigg
Lived in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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David Grigg

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The future is here. Coal is dead.

Quote, my emphasis:

In last week’s energy auction, Chile accepted a bid from Spanish developerSolarpack Corp. Tecnologica for 120 megawatts of solar at the stunning price of $29.10 per megawatt-hour (2.91 cents per kilowatt-hour or kwh). This beats the 2.99 cents/kwh bid Dubai received recently for 800 megawatts. For context, the average residential price for electricity in the United States is 12 cents per kilowatt-hour.
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+Cameron Levengood It's probably just pining for the fjords.
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Wise words: important for anyone involved in managing any kind of online community to read and understand.
 
+MrsA Wiggins suggested this as something more of the techies who keep getting G+ harassment policy wrong should read: https://medium.com/humane-tech/the-immortal-myths-about-online-abuse-a156e3370aee#.9bh1zl7se

In particular the parade of high-up G+ folks who came to my classic post (https://plus.google.com/+KimberlyChapman/posts/9gMF3qyqpbK) only to make excuses or ultimately get very little of what's been requested for years done.

And in light of recent acts by a particular high-ranking G+ staffer who posted self-congratulatory, self-quoting faux posters, accused me of "abuse" for pointing out that they're demonstrating poor social media skills on the whole business, and then deleted said post when the wider community begins to mock them for that accusation...yeah. This article below should be required reading at G+.

And this quotation sums up that whole problem nicely (since my classic post predates said person from even being at G+):

Too often, decisions about our online communities are being made by those who aren’t familiar with the discussion that’s come before. Perhaps if we can ensure that the well-intentioned aren’t repeating the hoariest and least accurate clichés that stand in the way of addressing abuse online, we can finally make some real progress.

Indeed.
After building online communities for two decades, we’ve learned how to fight abuse. It’s a solvable problem. We just have to stop…
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David Grigg

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Um, no. Any sensible investment manager would be criminally negligent to invest in companies that are going broke across the world and which are going to be left with billions of stranded assets.
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Is upset that investment isn't being made for political reasons or that he disagrees with the politics?
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David Grigg

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Amazing, just amazing, ceramics.
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The Late Scholar Jill Paton Walsh

I've been having trouble getting into books over the last couple of months. Perhaps I'm just trying to read the wrong books. This is the sole recent example of a book which immediately pulled me into the story and kept me reading. It’s another in Walsh’s series of pastiches of the detective stories of Dorothy Sayers, taking up Sayers’ beloved characters of Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane.

Walsh does as good a job of this as I think anyone could. She started off by completing the unfinished manuscript of Sayers’ Thrones, Dominations , which is set just prior to the Second World War. Walsh then wrote A Presumption of Death , based during the war itself, and did a fair job of depicting life in the English countryside during wartime. The Attenbury Emeralds is set after the war, but spends quite a bit of time revisiting an early case of Wimsey’s which Sayers alludes to a couple of times but never directly wrote about. There is a calamitous event at the end of that book which changes Wimsey’s status and role.

Walsh retroactively and cleverly papers over some of the plot holes or mistakes in Sayers’ work: for example that Sayers referred in different places to both the Attenbury Emeralds and the Attenbury Diamonds as Wimsey’s first case.

And now here we have the next volume, The Late Scholar , set almost entirely in Oxford University, which Walsh clearly loves as much as Sayers ever did. There are some nice references to sightings of J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, who were resident in Oxford at this period. There’s definitely a strong feeling of nostalgia running through the book. The story itself, as I say, was intriguing enough to pull me in and keep me reading through to the end. Wimsey and Vane sort out a series of puzzling deaths (which of course becomes clear are a series of murders) and discover what has happened to the mysteriously missing Warden of a fictitious Oxford College, and why. Not very deep, perhaps, but entertaining enough.
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Please help me??? Somebody....😞
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David Grigg

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Only for typography nerds like me. I found it fascinating. How Medium came up with a really sophisticated rendering of underlined text.
How hard could it be to draw a horizontal line on the screen?
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Next up; making ligatures look nice!...};-)
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David Grigg

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This is one article which really deserves to have the word 'finally' in the headline. Die, Flash, die!
In May, Google circulated a draft proposal to effectively kill Adobe Flash by blocking the plugin and prioritizing HTML5 by the end of the year. The company is going ahead with that plan to “de-emp…
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OMC BARRY R U OKAY?
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David Grigg

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I hosted this episode of the Unseen Podcast -- it was a lot of fun! We talk about the future of humanity in several aspects: will AI take over / will we become a space-faring species / will we change our biological makeup? Give it a listen.
 
Recorded: 19 August 2016 Released: 23 August 2016 Duration:65 minutes download the .mp3 audio file Host David Grigg welcomes Chris Prophet, Patrick Festa, and (eventually) Nick Nielsen to talk about the future of humanity. Pr...
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Fascinating!
 
An article of interest to book lovers everywhere.
The debate about ebooks v paper books is nothing new. Keith Houston explains how a very similar debate raged as the first books came to be in ancient Rome.
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What is the future of humanity? Will humans still exist in a thousand years? A million? Will we still live on the planet Earth? Or will AI have taken over and humans have become extinct?
This Hangout On Air is hosted by David Grigg. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
Live
Unseen Podcast - Episode 57
Fri, August 19, 8:30 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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David Grigg

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Where will this leave the podcast, +Paul Carr ?
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+Marsha Barnhart Sure, but continuing something which is working successfully for at least while is hardly an unreasonable expectation, either. If you can't make it work because it's "free" then why not charge for usage? I'd much rather that than the continual shifting of ground.
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David Grigg

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Not sure if everyone in this new public community has seen this call for panelists for Episode 57, to be recorded 19 August. Need your engagement in the topic thread!
David Grigg originally shared:
 
This is the event for Episode 57 of Unseen Podcast, which I will be hosting. Let me know if you can come (if the time of day is a problem, please let me know that and I'll see what I can do). Please engage with the topics thread here: https://plus.google.com/+DavidGrigg/posts/N8wx4ZE3DH8 . No engagement, no invite!
Unseen Podcast Episode 57
Fri, August 19, 8:30 PM

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Sorry +David Grigg, I was thinking I'd be able to join in on this one, but it's a bit too early for me to make it.
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David's Collections
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In his circles
1,120 people
Have him in circles
6,290 people
Милаши Рисоваши's profile photo
Valentin Bud's profile photo
Jessica Mercer's profile photo
Ilyanna Kreske's profile photo
Ivan Raszl's profile photo
Sujita Maharjan's profile photo
Ter buruk's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Writer of fiction, multimedia programmer
Skills
Editing, proof-reading, typography, layout, cover design
Basic Information
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Male
Story
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Editor, fiction writer, blogger, software developer, technophile, based in Melbourne, Australia.
Introduction
I live in Australia and I’m a husband, father and grandfather, short story writer, multimedia programmer, shareware publisher, one-time SF fan,  one-time fanzine editor, amateur 3D artist, amateur photographer, amateur choral singer… and probably a bunch of other stuff.

I recently returned to writing fiction after a gap of several decades, and it's what I intend to concentrate on from now on in my life. As a big part of this, I'm establishing a new web site called The Narratorium where I can feature my work.

I write a semi-regular blog on a variety of topics including what I have read and what I think about things. You can find it here.

I'm something of a latter-day Apple fanboy, after years of being a Microsoft adherent. It was the iPod, the iPhone and now the iPad which did the trick. I now do a large proportion of my reading on the iPad. But, on the other hand, I do own some 3000 "dead-tree" books, and I do love a beautifully produced hardcover edition.

I have several works now available in e-book and paperback format. These are all available through my web site.

I also now offer services to other authors such as editing, proof-reading, typography and layout for print, and ebook production.

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Previously
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia