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David Fraser
Works at McInnes Cooper
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David Fraser

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This may be instinctively known by most Canadians, but I've never seen it done. How hockey rinks are prepared for playing: How It's Made - CO2 Cartridges, Pretzels, Scissor Lifts, Skating Rinks
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David Fraser

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U.S. (correctly) identifies some Canadian privacy laws as trade barriers

The United States Trade Representative has released its latest Report on Foreign Trade Barriers [PDF] which specifically identifies certain Canadian provincial privacy laws as non-tariff trade barriers. It points to the public sector privacy laws in British Columbia and Nova Scotia and singles out Canadian federal government procurement of cloud services: ...
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A hint at the extent of warrantless access to customer data in Canada

Earlier this week, the Halifax Chronicle Herald published a story about information that has come to light about the extent to which law enforcement agencies are seeking -- and getting -- access to private information without a warrant. (See Ottawa has been spying on you | The Chronicle Herald [link in blog post])

MP Charmaine Borg tabled a question in Parliament looking for particulars about how often government agencies look for and get information about customers of telecommunications services. Perhaps not surprisingly, CSIS and CSE refused to answer. The RCMP refused to provide information, saying it does not track this information. The full document is available here [PDF].

What is most interesting about the document is the extent that the Canadian Border Services Agency, the organization that polices Canada's borders, asked for and received telco customer information without a warrant. It happened over 18,000 times and telcos refused only a handful of times, mainly if they didn't have the information requested. 

If I had been asked which government agencies seek warrantless access to customer data, I would have put CBSA pretty low on the list and would think they would represent a drop in the bucket. If that's the case, and the "drop in the bucket" is 18,000 requests, we must be looking at a VERY LARGE bucket. 

What's also troubling is that unless charges are laid, nobody ever finds out that their information has been obtained by law enforcement. And, in fact, there's a gag order that would prevent you from getting that information from your telco. I highly doubt that CBSA laid 18,000 charges last year, so there are thousands of Canadians whose information has been accessed and they will never know about it. 

Not surprisingly, some of the best analysis of this comes from Chris Parsons, a post-doctoral fellow at the CitizenLab at the University of Toronto. Read his full discussion of this here: Mapping the Canadian Government’s Telecommunications Surveillance https://citizenlab.org/2014/03/mapping-canadian-governments-telecommunications-surveillance/1/.
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David Fraser

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The Google Chromecast just launched yesterday in Canada. I've had one for a number of months and it is a very cool little device. It costs less than $40, plugs right into your TV and you can put just about anything from your phone or Chrome browser onto the TV screen. There are also a bunch of apps that are specifically tailored to work with it, including Netflix.

Last week, Tom was watching a soccer game on a laptop, streamed over the internet and with a click was able to watch it on the flatscreen TV in HD.

It's one of the coolest, geekiest things you can do with $40.
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This is absolutely ridiculous and a recipe for disaster. 
The Australian attorney general has mooted a proposal to require service providers to compromise their cryptographic security in order to assist in wiretaps.
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No #AutoAwesome  pre-fab snow involved....
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David Fraser

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Updates to Canadian federal privacy law tabled in the Senate

As expected, the government has tabled amendments to the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, but this time in the Senate as Senate Government Bill - S-4.

The highlights are breach notification and an exception to the consent rule for business transactions. I'll have more to say once I've given it a thorough going-over. Watch this space.
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Cloud Computing FAQ for Corporate Counsel 

The Canadian Corporate Counsel Association Magazine (CCCA Magazine) Spring 2014 edition had a strong focus on privacy, "Managing your Privacy Risk: An In-house Guide."

The edition included a version of my Cloud Computing and Privacy FAQ, focused at in-house counsel. For the full article: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_bUaJvZ9k_BRFYtSThWYy15UUU/edit?usp=sharing.
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Very cool. Can't wait to get my hands on one and see what creative developers can come up with.
Here are 10 great-looking Moto 360 app concepts created by 10 different designers on Dribbble.
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Not a fan of the Pebble watch? Lots of creative developers in that ecosystem as well. This is pretty slick looking though.
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This has been a natural progression for Google Now, and so not particularly surprising, but I wonder if people will worry about the persistent ambient audio awareness of the smartwatches like they are with Google Glass
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Have him in circles
1,149 people
Eric Lortie's profile photo
jordi morgan's profile photo
Shari Tucker's profile photo
Jason Kee's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Privacy Lawyer
Skills
privacy, law, internet policy
Employment
  • McInnes Cooper
    Privacy Lawyer, 2001 - present
  • Federal Court of Canada
    Law Clerk, 1999 - 2000
  • Patterson Palmer (now McInnes Cooper)
    Articled Clerk/Summer Student, 1998 - 2000
Contact Information
Work
Phone
+1 (902) 444-8535, +1 (650) 937-9471
Email
Google Talk
david.fraser@gmail.com
Address
PO Box 730Halifax, NS B3J 2V1
Story
Tagline
Privacy and IT lawyer.
Introduction

I am a partner with McInnes Cooper, where I advise  clients on all aspects of Canadian privacy laws and assist with technology transactions. I am the author of the Canadian Privacy Law Blog and the Canadian Cloud Law Blog

I am the former President of the Canadian IT Law Association and former Chair of the National Privacy and Access Law Section of the Canadian Bar Association. In addition to my privacy law practice, I also advise corporate, institutional and individual clients on intellectual property protection and commercialization, technology-related acquisitions, joint ventures, financings, licensing and legal disputes, including all manner of software, Internet and electronic commerce issues. 

I'm listed in the inaugural and subsequent editions of The Best Lawyers in Canada in the category of Information Technology law and the International Who's Who of Business Lawyers. 

I currently live in Halifax, but I grew up in a Canadian foreign service family, living in exotic locales such as Egypt, Ghana, India, Sri Lanka, Washington DC, Romania and Ottawa.

If I may be so bold, if you want to add me to your circles, I likely belong in ones entitled:

  • Lawyers
  • Nerds
  • Privacy types
  • Technology fanboys
  • Haligonians or maritimers
  • Canadians
  • Photographer wannabes
  • Miscellaneous

Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
@privacylawyer
Nice hotel but they really need to train their wait staff to be more attentive. It's not OK to sit there for ages with an empty plate or empty glass. Particularly if they walk by your table multiple times without paying attention.
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
I stayed here a number of times when it was the Delta Chelsea but stopped doing so. The place was tired and the service was in decline. I decided to give it a second shot when my new usual place was fully booked and I saw the photos of the lobby renovation. I was very disappointed that the guest rooms have not been touched. The rooms really, really need a refresh. They are very drab. I had no problems with service, but I overheard a number of people in the lobby complaining about the quality of service ... bordering on rudeness. I will not be coming back if I can avoid it.
• • •
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
I find it very hard to understand why they would choose to be closed on a Sunday, particularly when this is the prime time when people are working on their boats and may need some supplies.
Quality: Very goodAppeal: Very goodService: Good
Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago
Doesn't take credit cards.
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
40 reviews
Map
Map
Map
It's a shadow of its former self. Huge beer selection but it's often stale or flat. The food is underwhelming. Halifax has a lot of options for pubs, so pass this one by.
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
My experience was tainted as soon as I got to the front desk. It was early in the day, but I thought I'd check to see if my room was ready so I could off-load my luggage. My room was ready, but because it was before noon, they wanted to charge me $50. Really? The room was there, ready and empty. So I had to store my bags and come back a couple hours later. Otherwise, things were fine but that really sucked.
Quality: Very goodFacilities: Very goodService: Good
Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago
The vegetable salad was delicious and the service was excellent.
Food: Very goodDecor: Very goodService: Very good
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago