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David Eisner
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Some quick thoughts on PokemonGo and Ingress:

I went to a local Ingress farm location last night. It is in an area that generally has ample parking available. I could usually park, walk, upgrade and glyph. Last night there was NO parking. The entire road on both sides was lined with parked cars.

When I looked in the park, I saw no fewer than 40 people standing and sitting in groups. This was at 2230!!!! They were all playing PokemonGo. Laughing, having a good time, yelling back and forth to each other and whatnot. I heard someone call out that they caught a Snorlax, heard others calling out other Pokemon they'd caught (or hatched? I dunno). PokemonGo doesn't have the team component like Ingress does from what I've seen. Clearly, there are similarities with regard to socialising with other players. They go out with their friends in large groups to play, yet that team component is certainly lacking.

I've seen PokemonGo get more publicity in a week than I've seen Ingress get in 3.5 years. I've seen more reports of trespassing and vandalization with regard to PokemonGo players this week than in the last 3.5 years with Ingress.

I'm not sure if PGo players realise that their actions do and will continue to have an effect on its predecessor game and its players. I know the PGo crowd is, in general, younger and less mature. I hope for the sake of both games, especially Ingress, that players of both games learn to be smarter about choices they make in how, where, and when they play.

-A poorly lit park (in the middle of a neighborhood) isn't the place for 40+ people to hang out at 2200-2300h while loudly gloating about which Pokémon they just caught/hatched.
-Hiding in the bushes behind a PD (at night especially) isn't wise.
-Vandalizing an informational sign with spray paint isn't cool.

Use your brain. If it seems like a bad idea, it probably is. Please stop putting the players of both games at risk due to your poor decision-making.
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You may be officially old. 
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These buildings are in Nashville, TN.
19 new photos · Album by David Eisner
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I'll copy the captions over from FB when I get a chance. My recollection is that their Parthenon is kind of like the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago -- a temporary structure designed for a big fair, kept well beyond its intended design life, and eventually rebuilt into a permanent structure.
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Last week Sandra and I were wondering what these clear globules washing up on the Delaware beaches were. I thought they might be eggs  (or diaper fill ...), but now the mystery is solved: they are salps, a type of tunicate. Who knew? READ THE NEXT PARAGRAPH

By the way, this is some crazy-ass shit right here: "Eventually, the salp chains break apart. All the individuals that are released turn into females containing one egg. Males from a previous generation of salps will fertilize the females, producing an embryo. The "mother" then develops testes and goes on to fertilize the eggs of other nearby salps, all while the embryo continues to grow inside of it. That embryo eventually pops out and grows up to create another chain of clones."
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The aforementioned Utah Teapot print, in progress.
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My first foray into 3D printing. Hooray?
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I woke up one morning with the already-formed thought that my first 3D print should be the famous "Utah/Newell Teapot": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utah_teapot. Fortunately somebody had made a model suitable for printing available here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:68880 (in the form of an .stl file). I submitted the job (via web form) to the Engineering and Physical Science Library's Makerbot Replicator 2 printer (http://store.makerbot.com/replicator2). A few days later, my print was ready for pickup. I'm told it took 6 hours to print.

The teapot is about 18cm from back-of-handle to tip-of-spout. The librarians wanted to know if this was a Mother's Day gift (sorry, mom). They said it was the largest print they'd seen to date. I took it as a personal triumph when I noticed later in the day that the librarian was printing one for herself (or her mother).

The only challenging part was removing the "raft" from the lid. The raft is a removable platform that the printer prints first, and on which the model itself is then printed. For some reason it was really sticking to the lid (but not the body of the pot).

I'll post a video I took of the print in progress.
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Happy Purim, and thanks to The Kosher Pastry Oven for the hamentashen
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Rad!
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I guess I missed this the first time around. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXW0bx_Ooq4
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Right! Grad students...
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I really like the typography used over the doorways in the Silver Spring First Baptist Church. It has been empty for some time and is slated to be demolished, sadly. #silverspring
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It's usually the other way around (with mixed results), so this is a nice idea. The referenced paper's abstract:

"We describe the theoretical ideas, developed between the 1950s-1970s, which led to the prediction of the Higgs boson, the particle that was discovered in 2012. The forces of nature are based on symmetry principles. We explain the nature of these symmetries through an economic analogy. We also discuss the Higgs mechanism, which is necessary to avoid some of the naive consequences of these symmetries, and to explain various features of elementary particles."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RznZ_e6aDHc
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"In a small in-house theatre, the Meyers showed how Constellation works. Its principal purpose is to enable flexibility, so that halls can adapt to the needs of different kinds of event. Cinema needs a dry, echo-free environment, so that words can be understood. Chamber music benefits from crisp sound with resonant warmth. Orchestras are at home in halls with a longer reverberation time—more than two seconds, at the Musikverein. And choruses thrive on the booming acoustic of a cathedral. Constellation replicates this range of reverb times, which vary with the size of the space. One can choose from among different settings: cinema or lecture hall (0.4 seconds); chamber (one second); theatre (1.4 seconds); concert hall (two seconds); and “sacred space” (2.8 seconds). Thus, the system can give bloom to a somewhat dry acoustic, as at Zellerbach Hall, in Berkeley, and it can supply a cleaner sound for amplified jazz and pop, as at Svetlanov Hall, in Moscow.

“We couldn’t do this until we had a really high-powered computer,” John told me. “It’s calculating twenty thousand echoes a second, and that information has to stay in the memory for four or five seconds—a huge amount of data. Only a few years ago could we pull off the sacred-space setting, which is the most complex of all.” "

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/02/23/wizards-sound
Meyer Sound’s Constellation system performs the sonic equivalent of Photoshop. Credit Illustration by Michael Kirkham
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This happy little fellow was just Rhining his own business.
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Have him in circles
116 people
Jean Charles Salvin's profile photo
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A highly-organized collection of atoms occupying a spacetime region near you.
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I'm not in the habit of reviewing routine service, but the feedback here is so bad I thought I'd file a report. I reserved my car online and received a call a few days in advance to confirm my reservation. I arrived at the scheduled time to pick up my car and it was ready. The service rep. tried to sell me superfluous insurance, but in my experience that's standard industry practice. Finally, I was able to return my car without delay. The staff were friendly and professional, and the car worked well, as expected. In summary: good, prompt service, good car, no complaints.
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