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David D. Levine
Works at Science Fiction Writer
Attended Washington University in St. Louis
Lives in Portland, OR
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David D. Levine

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Do you understand sed’s uppercase N, D, and P commands? Please contact me. I have some questions.
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Hardly anybody does use them. That's why I'm asking! :-)
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In the Gmail iOS app, typing a search causes the search suggestions (eg contact names) to flash briefly on each typed letter, but then they vanish and can't be selected. I've tried killing and restarting the app, rebooting the phone, and deleting and reinstalling the app. Any suggestions?
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As you may have seen elsewhere (e.g. http://www.daviddlevine.com/2014/11/kate-hospital/) we are having a major medical Situation here which will probably continue for a long time to come. I'm going to have to make some changes in my use of social networking, and I'm afraid that G+ is going to get little or no attention from me for the duration. All my other social networks can be posted to from a client (I use Tweetbot for Twitter and Facebook, and MarsEdit for my own bog, LiveJournal, DreamWidth, and Tumblr) but G+ offers no API and therefore requires a manual copy-and-paste, with editing to reformat HTML into G+'s nonstandard markup language. Don't have time for that now. I do like G+ and will still be hanging around, but don't expect to see a lot of posts from me going forward.
Yesterday Kate was having difficulty finding her words, and couldn’t write a check. We took her to the emergency room, where they gave her an MRI. The MRI found some …
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My god, David. I am terribly sorry to hear about this, and I give you my greatest hopes that all becomes as close to well as it ever can.
Truly, you two have my best wishes.
And to heck with G+ if it's not in your schedule!
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Is there an “Apple TV Guide” that provides a searchable list of every show and movie that’s available right now on Apple TV’s many channels?
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Heh. I really didn't mean it to sound as sanppy as that.
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Novel ARABELLA OF MARS and two sequels sold to Tor

I am extremely pleased to report that my "Regency Interplanetary Airship Adventure" novel Arabella of Mars has sold to prominent SF publisher Tor in a three-book deal. The first volume will be published in late 2015 or early 2016, with two sequels to follow at yearly intervals.

Arabella Ashby is a Patrick O'Brian girl in a Jane Austen world -- born and raised on Mars, she was hauled back home by her mother, where she's stifled by England's gravity, climate, and attitudes toward women. When she learns that her evil cousin plans to kill her brother and inherit the family fortune, she joins the crew of an interplanetary clipper ship in order to beat him to Mars. But privateers, mutiny, and insurrection stand in her way. Will she arrive in time?

Arabella of Mars will appeal to fans of Naomi Novik's Temeraire books, Scott Westerfeld's Leviathan trilogy, and Mary Robinette Kowal's Glamourist Histories, all of which are fast-paced adventures combining a historical setting with a fantasy/SF twist. A novelette in the same universe, "The Wreck of the Mars Adventure," appeared in Locus Award winning anthology Old Mars, edited by George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois; another related novelette, "The End of the Silk Road," appeared in F&SF.

As for the author, I have published over fifty short stories in major markets. My stories have won the Hugo, have been nominated for the Nebula, and have appeared in five Year's Best anthologies, among many other honors, and my collection Space Magic won the Endeavour Award for the year's best F/SF book by a Pacific Northwest writer. I also wrote one of three new stories in the revised edition of George R.R. Martin's Wild Cards 1. In 2010 I spent two weeks at a simulated Mars base in Utah, and have presented a highly-regarded slide show about the trip at many science fiction conventions and other venues. A video I made of my short story "Dr. Talon's Letter to the Editor" was a finalist for the 2013 Parsec Award.

Getting to this point has been a real emotional rollercoaster, with many years of hard work, long waits, and near misses. Arabella of Mars, my first sale, is my fourth completed novel; I started outlining the first one at the beginning of 2003, so this moment is the culmination of more than ten years of effort. And yet, of course, this is also only the beginning of an equally long strange journey to publication and beyond. I have a lot to do in the next year, including soliciting blurbs, writing blog posts, assembling a street team, and scheduling readings and interviews, as well as shepherding the book through production, not to mention writing book 2 (which currently exists as a solid outline and 4000 words of text). It's going to be a heck of a ride, and I plan to keep you informed along the way.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email them or leave them as comments here. I can use topics for forthcoming blog posts!
:-)
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Or a "book gang."
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Oh hey, look what just landed in subscribers' mailboxes! The December 2014 Analog includes my story "Mammals."
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Go you!
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David D. Levine

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I am extremely pleased to announce the publication of my story “Damage” at tor.com. In addition to being free to read at http://www.tor.com/stories/2015/01/damage-david-levine, the story is also available as an ebook for 99¢ at all the major ebook stores.

I am also pleased to announce the podcast at Escape Pod of “Homegrown Tomatoes” by Lara Elena Donnelly, which I narrated. You can hear it, or download it as an MP3, for free here: http://escapepod.org/2015/01/10/ep475-homegrown-tomatoes/.

About “Homegrown Tomatoes,” reviewer K. Tempest Bradford at io9 said: “Not only do I dig this story, David Levine is an excellent narrator. If you haven’t heard him read his own stuff you’re really missing out — he’s amazing. And he’s just as good with someone else’s fiction.”
Read Damage, a new original science fiction short story on Tor.com by David Levine.
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Hmmm,

Congrats. 
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Over on Facebook, a friend asked “is it always poor writing to tell and not show?” Here’s my reply:

If you had an entire story that was nothing but “show” it would be overlong and tediously detailed. I interpret the maxim of “show, don’t tell” as applying to the most important parts of the story: the characters’ motivations and emotions, the key bits of worldbuilding, the pivotal moments of the plot. When the character is only driving across town? It’s okay to just tell us that part.
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I am amused that after clicking "Read more" to read the rest of Brooks's comment, the link at the bottom says "Show less."
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World Fantasy Convention 2014: Welcome to the Machine

Last weekend I attended the World Fantasy Convention in Washington, DC. Unfortunately, it was the same weekend as my local con, OryCon, and I'd had a tough time deciding between them. But, as it shook out, I made exactly the right choice.

You might think that the difference between the World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) and World Fantasy Convention (WFC) is obvious from their names, but it actually isn't. It is true that WFC focuses on fantasy rather than science fiction, but it doesn't exclude SF and the Worldcon doesn't exclude fantasy. The real difference between the two is that the Worldcon is a large (5000 people or so) convention by and for the fans, whereas WFC is a smaller (1000 people) professional conference for writers, publishers, editors, and agents. WFC generally has excellent programming, a dynamite art show, and a dealer's room focused on books, but the real reason most of the attendees are there is to schmooze. There is a hospitality suite, but the real heart of WFC is the bar where everyone hangs out.

My first WFC was one in Seattle back in the 20th century, when Kate and I helped out our friend Debbie who was running the hospitality suite. We thought it was a great con, but it seemed that there was this invisible web across the con of deals being made, and spending time with our writer friends felt as though we were keeping them from important business. Although fans are welcome at WFC, the con isn't really about them, and we didn't go to another WFC for years after that. But WFC changed substantially for me when I started selling my fiction professionally, and became one of my favorite conventions.

This WFC was a whole different animal for me, now that I'm a cog in the publishing machine. I met with my editor (my editor!) Moshe Feder, Tor's art director and head of tor.com Irene Gallo, and Tor's head of publicity Patty Garcia (she was bartending at the Tor party at the time, but very generously took some time to chat with me as well). I also bent the ears of many of my writer friends, who offered congratulations and sage advice. Several people commented that I was adorable with my puppy-like enthusiasm, and I have to own that.

I did hang out in the bar, a lot, and had many professional breakfasts and lunches in the hotel restaurant. I think I had five meals outside the hotel in six days, all within walking distance, and otherwise didn't leave the hotel at all.

I came out of the con feeling like my brain was rattling around in my skull, and I'm still on East Coast time. I have an enormous list of things to do for Arabella of Mars, and #1 on that list is to write the sequel. (I did manage to write every day of the con, even if it was less than a hundred words some days, but I missed a day after coming home when I found myself asleep at the keyboard.)

Publishing is a machine, yes, but it's a machine made of people, and WFC is where the gears are lubricated. I had a blast and I'm already looking forward to next year's WFC in Saratoga Springs.
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A friend used Dashlane to send me a password. I clicked the link in the email, which told me to install some software. I installed the software. I signed up for an account. It integrated itself with my browser and now it's trying to manage my passwords for me, which I DO NOT WANT. And then I clicked the link in the email and it took me to a page that says "This email address is not associated with a Dashlane account." But the address I signed up with IS the same address the message was sent to. I don't have time for this. There is no reason I should have to install system-level software that integrates with my browser in order to receive a single password.
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Dashlane shares access (a pointer?) to the password. It does not share the password. It's allowing you to use your friends password without exposing it. Hoops are involved. Some jumping required.
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Two events for readers in Portland this weekend

This weekend (October 18-19, 2014) I will be appearing at two events for readers in Portland, Oregon: Story Con and Stumptown Lit.

Story Con (http://storyconvention.com/what-when-where/) is a one-day readers' convention, "laser-focused on helping book lovers find their next great book." It features over 30 local authors doing readings, signings, and panels, and will be held at the Vancouver Community Library from 10:30 to 4:30 on October 18. I will be doing a reading at 10:30, a signing at 11:30, and will otherwise be hanging out most of the day.


Stumptown Lit (http://oregonwriterscolony.org/events/event/stumptown-lit-10-19-2014/) is Oregon Writers Colony's fall festival for readers and writers. It features workshops, readings by Oregon authors, a book fair, and a reception honoring Jean Auel, and will be held at the World Forestry Center on October 19. I won't be presenting, but I have books in the book fair (noon to 5:00) and will generally be hanging around.

Hope to see you there!
What is Story Con 2014? This post has you covered. Continue reading
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60 minutes to escape!

"Room Escape" is a genre of casual online game, originating in Japan, in which you wake up in a room and must search for clues and solve puzzles in order to escape it. Kate's a big fan of this type of game, so when I found out that a live-action version was launching in Portland I snagged tickets as soon as I could.

"Spark of Resistance" (http://www.60minutes.to/) is an interactive game, or possibly a theatrical experience, which takes place in a small room in an industrial space on the Portland riverfront. Up to 8 players at a time are locked into this room, with a 60-minute clock to figure a way out. It was tons of fun and I'd recommend it for anyone who enjoys a challenging puzzle.

One thing that I don't like about room escape games online is the arbitrary nature of the puzzle. It's never clear to me why you are in this room or why, if someone wanted to provide clues to help you get out of it, they would be so ridiculously obscure about it. Also, puzzle escape games often devolve into "pixel hunting," in which you have to click on absolutely everything in hopes of locating the one click point that reveals a hidden clue or tool.

"Spark of Resistance" isn't arbitrary. You are given a clear plot (involving espionage and paranoia in an oppressive fictional country) and, as you are in a real room made of real things, there's no pixel-hunting... you use your actual eyes and hands to search the walls and drawers for actual hidden objects. This made it a lot more fun than any online game. The props and devices in the room were well-constructed, engaging, and thematically appropriate.

The puzzles in "Spark of Resistance" are challenging, but not impossible (especially if you are familiar with the conventions of the genre, e.g. no clue applies to more than one puzzle), and the game masters are watching and will provide timely hints if you get stuck. Even with hints, though, we didn't manage to finish the last puzzle before the 60-minute timer ran out. However, as we came so close, they let us back in and we finished in about ten more minutes. We were told that so far no paying players, and only one team of beta testers, has actually escaped in time -- we came the closest of any paying team so far. (The game hasn't been running very long.)

"Spark of Resistance" is a game for up to 8 players. If you have fewer than that, the remaining tickets for your time slot are available and may be purchased by other people, so if you don't have a full team of 8 you might wind up playing with strangers. We found that with 8 people in the room we did get in each other's way a bit, but on the other hand with 8 people we had more eyes on each puzzle, more people looking for clues and objects, and more parallel processing on independent puzzles. I think 6 would be ideal... I don't think 2 people would have a chance of solving the entire room in time.

If you're in Portland and enjoy logic puzzles, I'd definitely recommend "Spark of Resistance."
The Game. Spark of Resistance is an exciting, interactive live escape game in Portland, Oregon for eight people. An enigmatic secret agent locks you in a room. Everything in the room is a mystery to be solved or a clue to discover. You and your friends, colleagues or family must use your wits ...
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Sadly no. I'm in Madison, WI.
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Work
Occupation
Science Fiction writer
Employment
  • Science Fiction Writer
    1998 - present
  • McAfee
    UI designer, 2002 - 2007
  • Intel Corporation
    Software engineer, 1986 - 2001
  • Tektronix
    Technical writer, 1983 - 1986
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Portland, OR
Previously
Milwaukee, WI - Minneapolis, MN - St. Louis, MO
Story
Tagline
Award-winning writer of SF and Fantasy short stories
Introduction
My story "Tk'Tk'Tk" won the 2006 Hugo Award for Best Short Story.  My story "Titanium Mike Saves the Day" was a nominee for the 2007 Nebula Award, and "The Tale of the Golden Eagle" was a previous Hugo nominee.  I'm a John W. Campbell Award nominee (2004 and 2003), Writers of the Future Contest winner (2002), James White Award winner (2001), and Clarion West graduate (2000).  I've sold to F&SF, Asimov's, Realms of Fantasy, and anthologies including Mike Resnick's New Voices in SF and four Year's Best volumes (two Fantasy, two SF).
Education
  • Washington University in St. Louis
Basic Information
Gender
Male