Profile

Cover photo
David Boutelier
Works at University of Newcastle
Lives in Newcastle
33 followers|92,602 views
AboutPosts

Stream

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
Between excursions I have made great progress on the piv. I need to test the limits of the system in terms of resolution and get the first version out.  
Between excursions I have made great progress on the piv. I need to test the limits of the system in terms of resolution and get the first version out.  
1
Add a comment...

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Positively-weathering volcanic dike near Granby, Colorado
http://ow.ly/QejOa
(Mountain Beltway at #AGUblogs)
My friend Barbara am Ende sent along this lovely image of a dike in Colorado: Here's the site. You can see the dike in Google Earth. Dikes are fractures, filled with molten rock, which then cools a...
View original post
1
Add a comment...

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
This year the excursion had to be postponed because of the weather, and accelerated due to mother’s day on the Sunday. Then the tide was not with us, and a the Swansea outcrops were underwater for a long while. It was otherwise a pleasant day to be out,…
This year the excursion had to be postponed because of the weather, and accelerated due to mother’s day on the Sunday. Then the tide was not with us, and a the Swansea outcrops were underwater for a long while. It …
1
Add a comment...

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
North of Newcastle is a long sandy beach with large eolian sand dunes. You can visit the dunes by horse, camel or four-wheel drive buses. I simply walked up the first dune.
1
Add a comment...

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
Broken Hill feeling of BIG emptiness. Love it.
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
33 people
Christian Boutelier's profile photo
OurAmazingPlanet's profile photo
Xiaoguang Liu's profile photo
ronan hebert's profile photo
Jenny Boutelier's profile photo
ced deparis's profile photo
Dietmar Muller's profile photo
Kamil Ustaszewski's profile photo
bruno radegon's profile photo

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
Broken Hill excursion 2015

I have not been very prolific on this blog. But here are couple of photos of the last excursion to Broken Hill. I was again blessed with a great weather.
I have not been very prolific on this blog. But here are couple of photos of the last excursion to Broken Hill. I was again blessed with a great weather.
1
Add a comment...

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
In the beginning of July, 12 students went on the GEOS3330 Metamorphic and Field Geology excursion to Broken Hill. This field trip provides students with the skills required for structural geology and metamorphic analysis by examining the complex terrains…
In the beginning of July, 12 students went on the GEOS3330 Metamorphic and Field Geology excursion to Broken Hill. This field trip provides students with the skills required for structural geology and metamorphic analysis by examining the complex terrains seen …
1
Add a comment...

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
Last post I did not include any photos of Swansea head. Here are some good shots of our students trying to study the rocks despite the high tide.                 Thanks Maxime for the photos.
Last post I did not include any photos of Swansea head. Here are some good shots of our students trying to study the rocks despite the high tide.                 Thanks Maxime for the …
1
Add a comment...

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
A Thousand Kilobots Self-Assemble Into Complex Shapes

When Harvard roboticists first introduced their Kilobots in 2011, they'd only made 25 of them. When we next saw the robots in 2013, they'd made 100. Now the researchers have built one thousand of them. That's a whole kilo of Kilobots, and probably the most robots that have ever been in the same place at the same time, ever.

http://www.wired.com/2014/08/largest-robot-swarm-ever/
http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/robotics-hardware/a-thousand-kilobots-self-assemble
1
Add a comment...

David Boutelier

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
John Oliver had a great piece talking about income inequality in the US, and how people perceive it. The key point, which he does a great job of explaining, is how people perceive laws which protect the rich at their own expense as being in their favor, in case they might become rich in the future: there's a profound psychology behind that. As he puts it, "I can clearly see this game is rigged... which is what's going to make this so sweet when I win this thing!"

There are actually many deeper levels to this thought which he doesn't go in to, but which also affect us deeply. The belief that "most people who want to get ahead can make it if they are willing to work hard" -- held by 60% of Americans according to a Pew study -- has as its other side the implication that if you don't get ahead, that means you personally failed.

Apart from the obvious implications this perspective has for policy (are the poor poor because they didn't try hard enough?) this has individual consequences. Michael Kimmel pointed out a very interesting one in the context of gender: to be a (white) man in the US (especially if you come from a "traditional" American home) carries with it a very strong version of this norm, that if you work hard, play by the rules, don't whine, don't ask for things, and so on, you'll succeed: the reward will be a good job, a home, a family, the respect of other men. This is the social status of maleness: it has nothing to do with your genitals, it has to do with being accepted and respected as a man. That's just the same sort of thing that John Oliver is talking about, but with extras on it: it's a belief that if you work hard, and sacrifice a lot, you'll succeed, and thus get the respect of your peers.

So what happens, in this story, if the economy is in the dumps, or if the factories close, or for any one of twenty other reasons you don't succeed? Not only do you not succeed, but you lose your status as a man: which is to say, you lose one of the things that's most core to your self-identification. You lose (you expect) the respect of your peers. The problem with this vision is that it ties absolutely everything up into one basket, and tells you that success or failure is entirely your fault. Which would be a lot better if that were actually true; but (coming back to the economics again), it really isn't, especially today. Most people could never afford to buy the house they grew up in -- not because of anything they did, but because of the relative trajectories of real estate prices and wages. Houses simply cost a lot more than they once did, which is another way of saying that wealth (things you own) is steadily becoming more valuable than your labor. Which is great if you inherit the house, but not so great if you don't -- or if, say, you lose that house in a foreclosure, which therefore not only costs you your home, but that large asset which can give you income (e.g. in the form of not having to pay rent yourself) in the future. 

The myth that we "have never been a nation of haves and have-nots; we are a nation of haves and soon-to-haves" (as Sen. Rubio puts it) is captivating, but it doesn't actually make economic sense: Unless the total wealth of the country is increasing quickly enough for literally everyone to be getting not just richer, but enough richer to make a qualitative class leap, it would be physically impossible for this to work. And -- as John Oliver points out, and really, why are you reading this instead of listening to him? He's much funnier than I am -- that belief can be used by crafty politicians to fleece you.
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
33 people
Christian Boutelier's profile photo
OurAmazingPlanet's profile photo
Xiaoguang Liu's profile photo
ronan hebert's profile photo
Jenny Boutelier's profile photo
ced deparis's profile photo
Dietmar Muller's profile photo
Kamil Ustaszewski's profile photo
bruno radegon's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Newcastle
Previously
Nice (France) - Toronto (Canada) - Paris (France) - Potsdam (Germany) - Melbourne (Australia) - Montpellier (France) - Brest (France)
Links
Work
Employment
  • University of Newcastle
    Lecturer, 2014 - present
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • WordPress