Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
David Amerland
Works at DavidAmerland.com
Lives in Manchester
357,714 followers|38,082,294 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTube+1'sReviews

Stream

Pinned

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Pageviews Are Dead!

We are in the attention economy where making readers jump through hoops just so you can count pageviews is likely to tank your site. Read on: http://goo.gl/ffGMvL. 
37
4
Todd Lohenry's profile photoJohn Chvatal's profile photoZara Altair's profile photoGeorge Station's profile photo
11 comments
 
+David Amerland To Jump into the newspaper and news organization conversation.   I think we will see a return of the professional Journalist and the virtual newsroom, but they will be for hire.  Hire to anyone or any company who wishes to hire them.  Journalism is not dead, it is just transitioning to a new medium.  The Virtual Newsroom is here, and it is for hire.  We will see companies become their own News Agency.  +Schneider-Electric  is an excellent example of a company who is creating their own newschannel.   As for jumping through hoops.  I can't stand those sites that make you click from page to page.  One of my biggest pet peeves! 
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Seeing many of those whose writings and views shaped my own, way back when, pass away makes me conscious that I am burning through the second half of an inverted hourglass. #DefinitelyNoTimeForSleep  
15
1
Scott Worthington's profile photoMicheleElys Mer's profile photoJim Munro's profile photoMr.Leon Kidd's profile photo
6 comments
 
Life is only 4000 weekends long if you are lucky.
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Summer! I can quite comfortably live like this for years ☺☺
26
Nicky Pasquier's profile photoDavid Amerland's profile photoPatti Pokorchak's profile photoRichard Wright's profile photo
16 comments
 
101degrees is long and cold 
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
I am Alright Jack!

Ships are, perhaps, the ultimate survival zone. Tiny areas of safety in a permanently hostile environment they imbue those who sail in them with a sense of their own fragility, an awareness of their own mortality and a need to define the imperatives that drive them. It is no surprise that they have given us one of the most memorable, persistent and contentious phrases of all time: http://goo.gl/xFhIio. One that represents both a philosophy that has a basis in logic and an attitude that doesn’t. 

To understand the contradiction and the reason it’s so important today we need to get back to basics. Psychological egoism (https://goo.gl/b4kvlR) suggests that everything we do is motivated by self-interest, even altruism: http://goo.gl/NNMGQ0

Self-interest, perhaps, reaches an apex of sorts when it comes to the nation-state. After all, here’s an artificial entity, divorced of the pain/pleasure biological imperative, set up to maximize its own well-being because it perpetuates its existence and that of its internal systems and minimize anything that will produce stress upon those systems. Australia, of late, a country founded as a penal colony (http://goo.gl/ZDivCf) has come under criticism for its treatment of those seeking refuge within its borders: http://goo.gl/xAJ1Dq

We are destined, perhaps, to repeat history by forgetting where we came from and, with time, assuming the trappings of that (or those) that we formerly detested. In the past war provided a regular shake up both at a political and socio-economic level and its natural attrition of human stock reorganized the social demographics and ensured that things did not long stay the same. The last world war and the power of our weapons has ensured that we no longer go down the path of all-out conflict, but the proliferation of ‘local’ conflict across the globe has now reached the point where one humanitarian crisis after another (https://goo.gl/U2PNRV) begins to loom.

The uneasy truth is that in a global world there is no “local conflict”. The impact of what happens in one area can no longer be contained: http://goo.gl/OPMO3y and what affects one state, sooner or later affects others (as the recent Greek crisis showed: http://goo.gl/LXOBPH). 

There is a paradox here that helps perhaps explain the difficult to understand “I am alright Jack!” response. While we can, intellectually, process an enormous amount of information and workout our place and presence in a global setting, as individuals we are best geared to be effective locally. The disconnect between our perception of what we can understand and our limited capacity to affect things leads to a compartmentalization effect. The dissonance becomes manageable only when it is compartmentalized, our responses as individuals fragmented. 

There is a clarity we can understand in the approach that says “all others are different and everyone who is different is not like us”. It allows us to sit by and do little when unthinkable events unroll: http://goo.gl/YysPv8. It paralyzes us when aggressive sentiments build up: https://goo.gl/ojydzM. It leads to political grandstanding that feeds the frenzy: http://goo.gl/pukc12 and on a wider scale it brings us to this: http://goo.gl/U5npsf - talk of indiscriminate targeting under the guise of legitimacy propagated by people whose own morality and honesty is suspect. 

Melissa Fleming, having seen the humanitarian crisis close up paints a different, more human picture: https://goo.gl/YDoHyS. The difference between her approach and that of, say Christie’s (http://goo.gl/pukc12) lies in the understanding of the wider context of self-interest. When taken to a logical, long-term, extended conclusion creating greater security and equality with more opportunities and peace is something that ultimately benefits us all. 

Even the coldest rationalist can imagine how the potential of human stock, now lost in deplorable conditions, could, given a chance, bloom into thinkers, philosophers, inventors, engineers whose thoughts and ideas would drive the 21st century world much like the global war refugees drove the 20th. 

How do we do that? One answer perhaps may be found, unsurprisingly, in eleven simple rules for getting along in complex workplaces: http://goo.gl/jT0j. On the principle that what works in one place can be made to work in others, they are perhaps an easy in. A guide we can apply that allows us to treat each other, first, as entities with rights that deserve respect which can then lead to a more finely tuned understanding of what it is that drives each of us, and then all of us together. 

I hope you haven’t been remiss. As the last weekend of the summer rolls on, you should have coffee aplenty. Chocolate cake, croissants, cookies and chocolate ice-cream. Have an awesome Sunday, wherever you are. 
53
10
Ara Wagoner's profile photoAlexandra Riecke-Gonzales's profile photoMicheleElys Mer's profile photoJaime Ocadiz-Ortega's profile photo
28 comments
 
Calhoun's and Freedman's studies are very interesting +Ron Serina.
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Countdown to what promises to be another awesome HOA. +Oleg Moskalensky and +Gina Fiedel have brought their own unique stamp of what makes an HOA to the web. Yours truly is glad to be able to be there :) 
 
This will be a more philosophical undertaking, where I'll be joined by +Gina Fiedel and +David Amerland.

Here's a simple (very simple) question for you - Do you want your business to be efficient?  

Most would easily answer 'Yes'.  Because efficiency brings savings in time and money, allowing one to have more of both and sounds like a good thing, right?  Maybe, maybe NOT...

There's a human element involved in running most every business and humans don't really cherish the concept of change, which is a requirement to really achieve the above.  Thus - the dilemma and that's what we'll be talking about.

We realize it's a tough topic, likely without any concrete and specific answers, but we think it's still worth brainstorming about and discussing it.

Please join David, Gina and myself for this, promising to be different yet interesting perspective into this topic of our times.
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Oleg Moskalensky. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
Live
Mixing Efficiency with Humanity
Mon, September 14, 6:00 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

19 comments on original post
14
2
David Amerland's profile photoOleg Moskalensky's profile photoSEO's profile photoCristina Moldoveanu's profile photo
7 comments
 
And yet we still click really well, +David Amerland​, even across continents!! I'm now being identified as "Oleg with David?" Which is both an honor and a privilege. I'll share the details at another time.
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Why You Shouldn’t Pay Good Money to See Fantastic Four

It’s been weeks since I saw the film and by now it’s had all the bad press it can handle so this may seem a bit like flogging a dead horse, but on the premise that maybe some of you have been living in your holiday pad on Moonbase Alpha and have not been tuning into Terran channels at all, here we go: 

The opening line of the Fantastic Four trailer: “Dr. Storm. We gave you six years and millions of dollars and you gave us nothing. What’s different this time?” may as well summarize the film both on and off set. Just substitute helmer, Josh Trank’s name for Dr Storm. Fox studio for Dr Allen (who speaks the lines) and a few more zeroes in the budget for the dollars that were spent to produce a squib. 

The director’s role is a hotly disputed item in films. Arguably a director creates the vision, generates the chemistry betrween the actors and brings together a million disparate ensemble pieces and moments into one seamless whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. Like the conductor in an orchestra the director makes sure that everything happens when it must and not before. So, a director who also writes part of the script is like a conductor who also writes the music he is asking the musicians to perform and while that may be ok-ish in an orchestra when things are going smoothly in a blockbuster summer super-hero music that already has enough incendiary ingredients to open an Olympic Games ceremony in Moscow it might just spell out D-I-S-A-S-T-E-R. 

Usually when I review a film I balance its watchability with my knowledge of the technicalities that really need to work together such as character development, story progression, story arc tension, plot devices and satisfactory resolution but in the foregone conclusion that’s the still-birth of this one the decent thing to do is to look at the landscape where it died and ask what is it exactly that’s made it possible? 

A blockbuster summer movie used to be a sure fire thing. You put in a little bit of a corny but heartstring-tagging storyline, threw in some cool SFX, made the CGI central in the key scenes, added the movie-specific equivalent of the burning helicopter moment and shook vigorously for about 100 minutes. The end result may not have been high art but at least it wasn’t a dud either. It moved the soda cans and the popcorn which is where all the real money came from.  

The fact that we now expect a little more from summer blockbusters shows exactly how much we have changed, as audiences, and how little the film industry has. On the day of its release Josh Trank, who helmed the movie, pretty much disowned it: http://goo.gl/R5UXTc

Then came in the fanboy laments. Originally billed as a trilogy with work on the second about to start, the franchise died in the water, pretty much from its opening weekend. The burning question here is “Why?” – Why would a major film studio approve the release of a film, overriding the concerns of its director (http://goo.gl/k2DtvD) and engaging in a tag-of-war (http://goo.gl/nk30d2) that delivered a turkey? 

The answer you’re looking for may lie in the franchise rights that Fox has expensively and under conditional clauses purchased from Marvel Comics. Basically Fox had to produce a Marvel Superhero movie this year or lose the rights it has purchased. Ready or not, losing those rights may be more costly for Fox than serving us a film that tanked. 

When film-making becomes part of behind-the-scenes horse trading the last thing we, as cinema goers, should do, is ratify it with our hard-earned loot. Give this one a total miss (unless you happen to have a free copy somehow and 100 minutes of your day to burn). 
23
3
Ahmed Babkir's profile photoMichael Ehline's profile photoDouglas's profile photoStainsław Stelmaszczyk's profile photo
14 comments
 
الرجل الصخرة
 ·  Translate
Add a comment...
In his circles
1,145 people
Have him in circles
357,714 people
Cienna Giago's profile photo
Ryan Wright's profile photo
David Mitchell's profile photo
Leslee Ramirez's profile photo
DeShon Walters's profile photo
sherry agosto's profile photo
Maria Sanchez's profile photo
siamak iranian's profile photo
Mark Pormen's profile photo

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Oops!

I wonder if public executions are still a thing. He'd be a prime candidate for sure. :D 

To explain the context a little: "Over the weekend, a boy holding a drink tripped over his own two feet and broke his fall with a 350-year-old Italian still life worth $1.5 million." (sigh)
 ·  Translate
9
Coach G Moore's profile photoMicheleElys Mer's profile photo
15 comments
 
+Coach G Moore thanks Coach, it's quirky, glad to hear you laugh
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Pure joy, shared courtesy of +MicheleElys Mer and +Steven Krohn 
 
This is just an AWESOME video of a baby elephant experiencing the sea for the first time.
15 comments on original post
22
David Amerland's profile photoDavid F “SmallBizDavid” Leopold's profile photoMicheleElys Mer's profile photoLeila Martin's profile photo
9 comments
 
Pure joy! Just delightful
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
I am not sure if Nike can dial up the charm any higher. :) It's 36 degrees Centigrade in the shade (96.8 Fahrenheit) and she is chilling with the Buddha. :) 
49
1
David Amerland's profile photoMicheleElys Mer's profile photoJulie Holberg's profile photoTR M's profile photo
24 comments
 
Nike is very clever and knows where and with whom to chill. +David Amerland :)
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Facepalm Europe

The EU is, of course, a well-oiled machine, a unified, borderless market with a population of over 500 million people where the movement of money, goods and services creates a hum that's felt across the planet. 

Oh, wait. That's what the European dream was meant to be. Instead, lacking the visionaries required to drive it forward it has become a lurching bureaucratic behemoth, stumbling from one crisis to the next. Lacking identity, cohesion and a sense of Europeaness (that should really be a word) the EU also lacks a distinct identity and a moral core. Its collection of self-serving states bickering over sovereignty issues while competing for supremacy and weighing just who benefits the most from the Union has led to a Frankestein creation that at the moment manages to chalk up one fail after another. 

Whether the near financial collapse of one member state reveals that EU membership is not equal as some states are more equal than others (as the Greek crisis and its handling proved) or the influx of immigrants shows that there is no communication between states, no policy that's European and no real Europe to speak of: "There is no European Union standard for asylum; no common list of countries regarded as in conflict, and thus more likely to produce refugees; and no collective centers where asylum seekers can be met, housed, fed and screened." 

instead, even in this moment, with people dying in droves, with bodies being founded abandoned, suffocated in sealed vans on the highways of some of the world's most prosperous countries (http://goo.gl/YAONQN) EU countries squabble over the number of immigrants they should take, their religious orientation (!) and who should be paying for them (http://goo.gl/McomDA). 

These are serious failings, matters that affect both the European identity at a deep level and the sense of humanity that one has. I have consciously chosen to link them with a moment of total absurdity, with the South Park copyright issue (http://goo.gl/923K00) because they are intrinsically linked. 

When European nations and European organisations become embroiled in costly, absurd copyright details that truly do not benefit the consumer and only help perpetuate the culture of cronyism and lobbyism that marked the 20th century, it is highly unlikely that we can rise to the moral sensitivity required to see the immigration crisis as a call to humanity rather than another opportunity for pocketbook politics.

Nothing happens in a vacuum and without a reason. The EU, right now, is a mess whose example is to be avoided and whose leadership and moral direction are to be derided. If it does not pull itself together and get its act straight it will continue to lurch from one crisis to the next, the pull of money pulling it together every time it threatens to fall apart while, in the meantime, the people within its borders slide into ever deeper divides based on religion, language and culture. 
54
10
Sharon Jackson's profile photomario roberto rezende de lucena's profile photoEmily Newton's profile photoJean-Marc Luna (juancaramel)'s profile photo
42 comments
 
+Raymond Cool I just blocked her. 
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nike sure knows how to deal with #Caturday. (She's sleeping on it ;) ). 
56
5
Norma Kantrowitz's profile photoSimon Cousins's profile photoErjona Bega's profile photoDavid Amerland's profile photo
16 comments
 
+David Amerland yes they know how to accept love play enjoy & sleep
Add a comment...

David Amerland

Shared publicly  - 
 
Money Moves

DARPA, these days, sounds like a tech startup talking about its next iteration of incremental improvements. Missions need to be cost-effective, the intelligence gathering networked, the deployment robust and efficient. 

This is swarm bot technology (i.e. networked intelligence acting like a hive-mind) being deployed independently from a human mission controller. The geek in me says this is freaking awesome. There is a somewhat less cheerleading part of me that thinks that the conversation regarding the deployment of autonomous, self-directing military hardware has yet to be had. 

Ethics, at some point, needs to catch up with the pace at which technology is evolving. 
DARPA wants to transform airplanes into drone carriers. Last year, the agency invited technical ideas and business expertise to help create a reusable airborne...
55
6
Lioudmila Scarpelli's profile photoStainsław Stelmaszczyk's profile photoDJ boy's profile photoCarlos Alberto Cortés Carrillo's profile photo
6 comments
 

Ya... U'd think... but once the government focuses on them like a startup... like Solindra... than its party time for DARPA.
ALL that $$$$ w/out any investing required... tax free $$$!!!
Add a comment...
David's Collections
People
In his circles
1,145 people
Have him in circles
357,714 people
Cienna Giago's profile photo
Ryan Wright's profile photo
David Mitchell's profile photo
Leslee Ramirez's profile photo
DeShon Walters's profile photo
sherry agosto's profile photo
Maria Sanchez's profile photo
siamak iranian's profile photo
Mark Pormen's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Manchester
Previously
Patras - Brisbane - Sydney - Miami - Perth - London - Athens - Saint Petersburg - Shanghai - Singapore - Prague - Barcelona - Corfu - Zante - Edinburgh -
Story
Tagline
Author, Speaker, Analyst.
Introduction

The world is changing. Showing how is part of what I do. I travel a lot (less than I used to). G+ is my home in more ways than one. In one way or another, all of us here, are part of a vanguard that "gets" the change that's happening.  

In my posts, interviews and podcasts I add pieces to the puzzle. I explain how each one fits in a bigger picture. How that bigger picture then makes sense. 

Sensemaking changes everything.

Before I got here, I used to be a corporate rat who used to be a journalist, before I jumped ship into full-time writing, speaking and blogging. 

In my offline time I indulge a lifelong passion in martial arts, I run, hit the heavy bag and try to find the limits at which we can go without sleep and still function. I also visit as many museums and cafes as possible. Funnily enough I regard what can be found in both museums and cafes as brain food. 

Fitness is important to me. It helps maintain a level of sanity that would otherwise require pharmaceuticals or expensive therapy. I pay some of what it has given me back by running  a Fitness Community. I am also a moderator of Plus Your Business a community focused on helping business people get the most out of G+ and the semantic web. 

Speaking of semantics, I am the owner of Google Semantic Search a community I started to explore the implications of semantic technology in daily life (and there are many) and I also own and post a lot in the SEO Help Community.

Professionally I advise a handful of companies globally, blog for a number of websites, including Forbes, journalism.co.uk, and socialmediatoday and write for magazines and newspapers. 

I give about 50 talks, speeches and presentations each year and hold an annual seminar on SEO and Social Media (details to which you will find on my website.). I advise a couple  of global companies and a handful of startups on social media positioning and search strategies and I write for Forbes, 21CIT, Insights and a number of dead-tree newspapers. 

Some of the Events  I have been part of:
  • SEO in the Sun (SEO & Introduction to Social Media)
  • Manchester SES (SEO)
  • Business Group Digital Conference (SEO & Social Media)
  • Rutgers University mini-MBA (SEO and Social Media Crisis Management)
  • Shanghai APAC executive SEO & Social Media Crisis Management training.
  • MxDE Senior Executive Program, Zug (Piercing the Search Bubble).
  • SMX East (keynote speech on Entities in semantic search)
  • Semantic Technology & Business Conference panelist
  • SMX London
Associated with: 

Currently working on:
  • Working on a writing project about which I can't yet say anything. (Sorry)
If you made it this far you might be interested to know that now all of my writing is curated (without comment) at Prometheus. I no longer use RSS on my website and the G+ Page here gives me the opportunity to archive all my writing across the web.  I have, however, created an RSS feed for it so you can keep track of everything I write here.

The best way to reach me is through Google+ or my website: davidamerland.com
Bragging rights
I used to wear a suit.
Work
Occupation
davidamerland.com
Skills
Breathing without much effort.
Employment
  • DavidAmerland.com
    me, present
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
September 6
Relationship
In a domestic partnership
Other names
'Hey You!'
David Amerland's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Fox Targets Free Fitness Workout For Using the Word 'Avatar' - TorrentFreak
torrentfreak.com

Twentieth Century Fox has a track record of fiercely protesting its intellectual property. So when a website offering free fitness programs

Google's Knowledge-Based Trust (KBT) Proposal
www.seoskeptic.com

Google's Knowledge-Based Trust would score the trustworthiness of resources by evaluating the correctness of their factual information.

Trust and the question of Invisible Forces
davidamerland.com

“What is Trust?” the very fact that we need to ask something so basic shows both the poor state of our understanding of what it is and the f

If People Could Read Your Thought’s Would You Think Differently? – Chris...
www.chrislangwrites.com

David Amerland posed the question: “What If You Could See Thoughts? What would change for you exactly?” So I began to think of it more like:

Micro Drone 3.0: Flight in the Palm of Your Hand | Indiegogo
www.indiegogo.com

It’s small, smart and streams HD footage to your phone, that’s just the beginning of Micro Drone 3.0 | Crowdfunding is a democratic way to s

Interest Graph Marketing is More Important than Social Graph Targeting
davidamerland.com

Interest Graph marketing is more important for your business than Social Graph targeting.

The Value of Conversation in the Social Media Era
davidamerland.com

In the social media era the value of conversation is proved by the depth and quality of information sharing it makes possible.

TT02: Interview With David Amerland Part 2 | Tom Huffman
www.tomhuffman.com

David Amerland has been doing martial arts since the age of 13. He was five times British Taekwondo Champion in the lightweight division. He

TT01: Interview With David Amerland Part 1 | Tom Huffman
www.tomhuffman.com

David Amerland has been doing martial arts since the age of 13. He was five times British Taekwondo Champion in the lightweight division. He

Angry in Athens, livid in Lesbos
www.economist.com

SOME Greeks think Alexis Tsipras, their prime minister, went too far in confronting the EU. Stratos wishes he had gone further. At 26, he is

Guide to Kicks
darebee.com

Our legs are enormously strong, they are longer than our arms and we use them from the moment we learn how to walk. Kicking however is not e

A Guide to Google+ Collections - Plus Your Business
www.plusyourbusiness.com

Google+ Collections are a new awesome feature from Google and here is a guide covering just about everything you'll need to know!

There are several things that make a bar by the sea: First the sea. On this Mare Mare is unrivaled. There are tables that are practically within five steps from where the waves break. The setting has been nicely decorated and on a hot summer night it feels brilliant. Second, the service. You do want to feel that everything is as magical and special as the setting and sea and here, unfortunately Mare Mare fails to deliver. Water, comes in plastic disposable cups (and it's not cold). The waiters are not trained and although they do try hard, their best is not sufficient substitute for a system to working the tables that allows the patrons to get their drinks in time without having to wait for more than forty thirty minutes (for a couple of drinks) and an additional twenty (for ice-cream ordered at the same time as the drinks, which came half melted). Consider the fact that you do spend money there and the prices are not cheap, the level for service is deplorable. If you really want to enjoy the sound of the waves and the simmering play of moonlight on the surface of the sea grab a rag and a portable cooler and spend some time on the beach, just five meters away. It's free and you get to supply your own drinks, but then again you won't get frustrated by an order that will come in parts, late and be disappointing.
• • •
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Two-floor gym with some superb equipment and really friendly stuff. I found it by accident when I was looking for a place to train and I have been a member now for the last three years. Whenever I am in Greece it's where I can be found when not working. ;) It is professionally run, has great opening hours and the membership fee includes classes as well as the use of the equipment. Of the many gyms that can be found in Patras this is one of the best. You will not be disappointed.
• • •
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Dedicated staff and excellent exam results speak for themselves. There are not that many businesses that managed to grow during the recession in Greece - this is one of them.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
Googleplex has a feel and atmosphere that is uniquely its own. I had relatively little time to spend there but the place is totally addictive. It thrums with intent and everyone you meet is dead earnest about their ability to change the world and have an impact. Plus you really got to love a place where ideas simply flow across every conversation.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
12 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Huge hotel with some history practically across the road from Penn Station, in Manhattan. Brief stay over three days it feels totally impersonal so if you want a more cosy feel this is definitely not the place to be. It is incredibly busy and often feels like a massive bus stop with crowds coming in and equally large numbers leaving. The lobby is massive. There is a concierge service but what they do exactly is hard to tell. A quick question on how to get somewhere resulted in my having to use my phone and Google maps any way. Then again this is NYC and the whole city feels like this. It adds to a s sense of imperative and speed that carries you along so you hardly notice the imperfections.
• • •
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
Budget hotel chosen for its proximity to a speaking venue. Great bar and restaurant and the staff were extremely friendly. It was clean, efficient and lived up to everything one might expect from a place like this.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
No visit to Paris can be complete without at least one trip to the S=arc De Triomphe. I walked the route rather than drive and it allowed me to take in the Seine river barges that were very much Highlander in style (for those who know the TV series). Totally loved the change of the guard.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago