Profile

Cover photo
Dave Hill
Attended Pomona College
1,215 followers|3,885,700 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube+1'sReviews

Stream

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Risks of the Nuclear Litter Box

Dude, everyone knows the danger of changing cat litter brands. The results can be truly disastrous ...
1
Add a comment...

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
Kitchen Project - Day 144: Islands and Peninsula

Next up: an Isthmus!

We completed the island (save some decorative panels), and put up the rest of the wall cabinets where the peninsula will be. Also we laid down the foundation for the peninsula. Woot!

Also, crown molding. Lots of crown molding. 

Tomorrow -- building the peninsula, adding some paneling, putting in one final cabinet by the windows after the contractors take care of some trim ... and we're wrapped up (for the moment).
11
Paula Jones's profile photoDave Hill's profile photo
2 comments
 
Feeling excited ...
Add a comment...

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
Steak from the Lab

This is actually tremendously good news, assuming the stuff is palatable. Beef cattle is horrifyingly expensive in terms of land and feed and water (and, yes, methane emissions and, for other livestock, waste management), but those costs are largely hidden through water subsidies and land use agreements and the like. And that ignores the moral considerations around animal raising conditions and slaughter.

(He said, having just gotten home from a huge meat dinner. Do as I blog, not as I blog I do.)

There will be economic displacement for cattle ranch owners and workers, certainly, though I suspect that "artisan beef" will never go completely away, even if the "cultured" stuff is tasty. But it could be both an economic necessity and a positive outcome if, half a century from now, the vast cattle ranches of the US (and other countries) are historic artifacts.
7
Paula Moore's profile photoScott Randel's profile photoDave Hill's profile photoDavid Newman's profile photo
11 comments
 
It's already possible to consume a whole meal as a pill. It's just that the pill is much bigger than we expected. We call them burritos! 😄
Add a comment...

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
Kitchen Project - Day 143: Of Ovens and Islands

No report yesterday because there was not a lot to see, but today ...

One of the more daunting elements to the kitchen cabinet install was the oven cabinet, which weighs an ungodly amount, needed to be custom-cut, and, oh yeah, weighs an ungodly amount. If there was going to be one item that I might invoke the Mythical Man-Weekend for, it would have been to wrangle the thing.

(The Mythical Man-Weekend, modeled after Fred Brooks' The Mythical Man-Month, was the idea that if we were really behind or if there were elements that simply could not be handled by Jim and me, or even with the ladyfolk assisting, we'd thrown manpower at the project to get it completed. Not only are we on or ahead of schedule, but the cabinet, though a serious bitch to move about, was manageable. All our friends can rest more easily tonight ...)

Having that in place, we're leaving the cabinet that goes beside it so that the regular contractors can put up window trim on Monday. Instead, we started in on the island, one of the features we are really looking forward to having.

While installing against walls can be a challenge, as walls are _never_straight up-and-down (or side-to-side), installing when your only guide is distance from the walls around, centering on lighting fixtures, or the level vagaries of the floor itself, is its own challenge.  We got about 2/3 of the island assembled, shimming like lunatics to keep the thing level, plumb, centered, and straight.  

The rest of the island will be finished tomorrow. That will leave work on crown molding, as well as finishing the peninsula. Plenty of time (as Jim and Ginger don't leave until Tuesday night).

Feeling good about the project, right now. And looking forward to publishing "Dave's Laws of Big Home Remodeling Projects" ....
5
Stan Pedzick's profile photoDave Hill's profile photoPaula Moore's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Dave Hill Those are on the far end of the kitchen. Maybe a little alcove. 
Add a comment...

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
"You should protect your data against everyone ... but us."

Law enforcement has always had a love-hate relationship with security and encryption. It's encouraged folk to protect themselves against cyber-threats because of the risks they pose to safety, the economy, intellectual property, and privacy ... but they get really hinkey when those measures keep them away from your data.

Proposing a back door to technology that only federal law enforcement can use is a laughable proposition. Knowing the back door is there means that everyone else, from commercial hackers to government-sponsored ones, will be trying to break it. And, inevitably, they will.

Since Rep. Carter (the congresscritter who is in charge of the subcommittee who funds cybersecurity efforts) avows he doesn't "know about this stuff," let me give a simple metaphor. If the FBI said, "You should keep your house securely locked, but we want to have a master key that lets us in if we need to, but don't worry, not only do we promise we'll only ever use it if it's legal and necessary, but we'll hide that key really well somewhere on your property where nobody but us will ever find it and use it to get into your house, we promise" ... what would be your reaction to such a proposal?
For years, the agency recommended phone encryption as a defense against criminals. Now, that information has been scrubbed from public view
5
1
James D.'s profile photo
Add a comment...

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
Operators are standing by!

These infomercial-style pet adoption commercials are hysterical.
Pet owners know that domestic animals have many uses around the home. Thousands of years ago, that's why we welcomed them into our dwellings in the first place, and we've come to appreciate them fo...
3
Scott Randel's profile photo
 
Riot. Riot!
:)
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
1,215 people
Henry Malon's profile photo
Little bit of everything's profile photo
Linda Tice's profile photo
Patrick Lyddy (Kobuu)'s profile photo
Dr.Vikas Tyagi's profile photo
Dave Epps's profile photo
Humoropedia.com's profile photo
Joan Fahlgren's profile photo
William Baughman's profile photo

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
Pondering "Munchkin Panic"

Trying to decide if tinkering with a faboo co-op game like "Castle Panic" by adding competitive Munchkin aspects is courting disaster or sheer brilliance. 

I suppose it depends on one's devotion to cooperation vs competition. If done right, it would make for some interesting gameplay balance.
GeekDad's favorite cooperative game, Castle Panic, gets a backstabbing update when it collides with Munchkin in the all new Munchkin Panic boardgame. Continue reading →
1
Scott Randel's profile photo
 
I've never played Castle Panic, but as soon as I heard about Munchkin Panic I knew I'd be getting it.
Add a comment...

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
Ranking the Marvel Cinematic Universe

Not a bad analysis, overall. I'd probably bump both Thor and "Agents of SHIELD" a rank or two higher, and "Hail to the King" and Captain America a rank or two lower, but it's a good write-up.

The MCU, for all that Warners/DC, Sony, and now Paramount are trying to imitate it, remains a fragile construct, without a serious dud to adapt to yet, or a major retirement/cast change (excluding Bruce Banner). But this summary gives some indication of the bench depth, and upcoming films and the Netflix series should help things even further.
 
Where does your favorite Marvel Universe film/TV show rank?
Even the studio’s missteps are eminently watchable. But some are more watchable than others.
View original post
2
Scott Randel's profile photoWilliam Altman's profile photoGary Roth's profile photoDave Hill's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Scott Randel I like Thor a lot, though I realize I'm an outlier there.  The Hulk movie I enjoyed a lot, though it's not a top pick overall.

IM3 runs hot and cold for me, squarely between IM1 and IM2. 

Ultimately, this kind of list for me is hard because there aren't any of the items mentioned that I didn't enjoy on some level.

I though it was interesting putting the One-Shots in there. If it's hard to compare a TV show to a feature length movie, it's even harder to compare either to a 5-10 minute featurette.
Add a comment...

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
Improving entrepreneurship by ... improving social welfare?

In summary, some new analysis demonstrates that when people know that there's a social safety net there to catch them if their attempt to start a new business fails, people start more new businesses. The same is true when bankruptcy laws are more lenient.

If true, that would indicate that screwing down on bankruptcy laws and getting rid of welfare programs, both conservative ideals (so as to reduce the "moral hazard" of "dependency") may have an opposite effect of what they want to see happen: people taking risks to create new businesses and innovate, cornerstones of American economic freedom, as Ronald Reagan himself boasted.
Research shows that when governments provide citizens with economic security, they embolden them to take more risks.
2
4
andrew mcmillan's profile photoAlexander Nikitin's profile photoSnow Andrews's profile photoSnowandrews-TheOther's profile photo
3 comments
 
+beatusqui "Do not bind the mouths of the kine who tread the grain."
Add a comment...

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
Inertia and the American Currency

There seem to be eleventy-zillion reasons not to change who's on any given denomination of money, and they all boil down to two:

1. "Person X currently on the $Z bill is a great American icon and it would be disrespecting him to boot him to the numismatic curb."

2. "Person Y being proposed for the $Z bill was a commie / war-monger / killer of babies / killer of someone / corporate shill / environmentalist fanatic / religious fanatic / atheist / person of the wrong race or ethnicity or religion or gender or orientation / person we cannot abide the immense honor of being on our money."

The last point is the biggest -- really, nobody's going to kvetch too much over Hamilton, Jackson, Grant, or Franklin being moved aside (Washington and Lincoln are probably too iconic).  Everyone and every group of everyones has people they must have on the money and people they mustn't have on the money, and the Treasury is highly unlikely to do anything unless (as the article notes) somehow it improves anti-counterfeiting measures.

That's the one weakness in this particular campaign: that it is looking for a singular change, and not proposing a regular rotation. People might be willing to put Sanger on the $20 if they knew that in two years they could be collecting Reagan double-sawbucks. A rotation between Teddy, Franklin, and Eleanor Roosevelts could be arranged. 

(I still stand by my position, though, that the parties involved should not only not be living, as is current policy, but should have been dead at least 75 years; that gets around a lot of the living memory political brouhaha, even if it excludes a lot of neat people.)

But going for a single person -- especially a woman  (which some yahoos will resent already, particularly since any woman who's made it to prominence enough to warrant the honor is likely to have ruffled feathers in some fashion) -- simply makes it that much mroe of a high stakes thing. "Do we want Ms. X on our $20 bill forever?" The fact is, there are very, very few people who I want on our $20 bill forever -- but that seems to be what we are stuck with.

Of course, if we keep debating long enough, we may get to the point where most folk say, "$20 bills ... do they still make those?"
The Treasury hasn't subbed out a portrait on a dollar bill since 1929.
3
Add a comment...

Dave Hill

Shared publicly  - 
 
Learning how one can act like a terrorist

Clearing your throat? Looking nervous? Recently shaved your beard? Wearing inappropriate clothing to the airport?

Just step over this way, sir.

On the one hand, looking for people displaying "suspicious behavior" seems common sense. On the other hand ...

... a lot of the behaviors are pretty common at an airport, especially with people who don't like to fly, who find the TSA checkpoints intimidating or irksome or frightening, who are late for their flight, or who are just having a bad day. 

... there's no evidence that the SPOT program, or others like it, actually spot actually dangerous people. Because the numbers of actually dangerous people are so freaking small.

This explanation for the program seems much more plausible:

'One former Behavior Detection Officer manager, who asked not to be identified, said that SPOT indicators are used by law enforcement to justify pulling aside anyone officers find suspicious, rather than acting as an actual checklist for specific indicators. “The SPOT sheet was designed in such a way that virtually every passenger will exhibit multiple ‘behaviors’ that can be assigned a SPOT sheet value,” the former manager said.'

In other words, it's the "loitering" or "being rude to a police officer" or "you were weaving a bit" or "your tail light is out" justification for either a gut hunch that someone's a suspicious individual, or else to apply more subjective and less justifiable reasons for further investigation or harassment (e.g., swarthy skin).

(h/t +Steve S)
Fidgeting, whistling, sweaty palms. These are just a few of the suspicious signs that the Transportation Security Administration directs its officers to look out for in airport travelers, according to a confidential document obtained exclusively by The Intercept.
4
Steve S's profile photoScott Randel's profile photoDave Hill's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Steve S While technically you can track all that stuff via ripples, I try to h/t to folk I get stuff from, as a thankee if nothing else, and as a habit from old school blogging days.
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
Mr. Nice Guy
Introduction
Husband, father, writer, gamer, diplomat, theist, civil libertarian, tech fakir, pointy-haired manager, traditionalist, Coloradoan, wordsmith, reader, blogger, magpie, nice guy.

I write about politics, religion, my particular geeky pop culture kinks (SF, Fantasy, Comic Books), and whatever other shiny objects attract my attention from moment to moment.
Bragging rights
A great marriage and a lovely teen daughter. But I can't take the majority of credit for either.
Work
Occupation
Pointy-Haired IT Manager
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Other names
***Dave
Dave Hill's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
What’s So Bad About Gluten?
www.newyorker.com

Millions of people have sworn off wheat, but there’s little science to support them. Michael Specter investigates.

The Secret Message in Abraham Lincoln's Pocket Watch
mashable.com

President Lincoln never knew the hidden message he carried with him every day.

Man practicing open carry law robbed of gun
koin.com

A man carrying a concealed weapon said "I like your gun, give it to me."

Dynamite embroidered cloth patches that tell it like it is
boingboing.net

Artist Mitch O'Connell has posted his astonishingly large collection of 1970s embroidered patches. I hope somebody starts making them again!

Colorado AG says all 64 clerks must issue same-sex marriage licenses
www.denverpost.com

Colorado Attorney General John Suthers on Monday said all 64 county clerks must begin issuing same-sex marriage licenses after the U.S. Supr

Deep-seeded vs. deep-seated
grammarist.com

Deep-seated = deeply fixed firmly in place. Deep-seeded is a misspelling.

Keurig coffee sued for $600M by Ontario-based Club Coffee
www.cbc.ca

An Ontario coffee roaster and grinder is suing U.S. giant Keurig for anti-competitive behaviour, claiming it is keeping the price of single-

Google+
plus.google.com

Google+ is a place to connect with friends and family, and explore all of your interests. Share photos, send messages, and stay in touch wit

Making More War
www.esquire.com

This could not be a more depressing morning. And so begins the war against ISIL...

Everything We Think We Know About Mass Shooters Is Wrong
www.esquire.com

Are we helpless to stop mass shootings? Is anyone even trying to stop them? The good news is that the answers are No and Yes. The bad news:

Larry Klayman: Military Should Oust Obama Like In Egypt
www.rightwingwatch.org

Larry Klayman is once again calling for the military to remove President Obama from office, telling Tim Wildmon of the American Family Assoc

Why Men Never Remember Anything
nymag.com

It could come down to how parents talk to boys when they’re little.

Peace Out! House Cancels Work Until After Election Day
talkingpointsmemo.com

The House of Representatives will adjourn until after the midterm election once legislative business is completed on Thursday. Majority Lead

Bundy sued after car hits cow on I-15
www.reviewjournal.com

In April, a car collided with one of rancher Cliven Bundy’s cows on Interstate 15 near his Bunkerville ranch, killing the animal and sending

Why Some Schools Are Selling All Their iPads
www.theatlantic.com

Four years after Apple introduced its popular tablet, many districts are switching to laptops.

Many lovely items, esp. the cinerary urns. But it's all organized very poorly (and there's an excess of cinerary urns on display). The display cards are all in Italian, but of wildly varying styles. Worth a visit while in Volterra, but maybe not the key thing to see there.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Decent "diner" fare. Good shakes, passable chili fries. Could use with a bit more cleaning attention to the dining room.
Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Entrees were very good, but a simple off-menu drink was bungled and the caesar salad was too deconstructed for its own good. Service was nice but not as helpful as it should have been.
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Food was excellent, as it has been on previous visits. It, and the extensive wine list, are pricey, but worth it. The service was good for the first 2/3 of the meal. We'd come in at 5:15 (we had 6p reservations but made it into town early). While the restaurant was mostly empty, the service was nicely attentive. As our meal was wrapping up, though, some larger parties came in and the restaurant filled up -- at which point it took about 25 minutes, from ordering, for our after-dinner coffees to appear, etc. So, definitely worth visiting, but try to avoid crowded times.
• • •
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
11 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Tasty (if overpriced) margaritas, and good (if not spectacular) carne asada and appetizer sampler. You could definitely do worse than to dine here, but I suspect you could probably do better, even if it truly is the oldest Mexican restaurant in Los Angeles.
Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
We were a large dinner group, most of us there for the first time. The waitstaff was very helpful and supportive. The food selection was broad, and everyone seemed to enjoy what they got. I'd go back again.
Food: Very GoodDecor: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
The wine was good (if not fabulous); the service was friendly (if not knowledgable), the shareable food platters were excellent; the ambiance was terribly noisy (wish we'd eaten on the front porch). Like Randy, we found the wine flights (reds) were overchilled. They were much better once they'd warmed up.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago