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Dave Bartel
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Hey +Rogers Communications, let me know how that brilliant choice of executives works out for you. It's like you just can't stop making very public fools of yourselves.
 
The Content Industry Connect conference, which was held in Toronto yesterday, featured a panel of leading television executives from Bell, the CBC, Corus, Rogers, and Shaw Media. Several people were live-tweeting the event when a comment from Rogers…
The Content Industry Connect conference, which was held in Toronto yesterday, featured a panel of leading television executives from Bell, the CBC, Corus, Rogers, and Shaw Media. Several people were live-tweeting the event when a comment from Rogers Senior Vice President David Purdy caught my eye. According to Kelly Lynne Ashton, a media policy expert, Purdy called on the Canadian government to shut down the use of virtual private networks:
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Yeah, good luck with that, eh?  Does he realize most employers, in an enterprise, use VPNs heavily for their workers?  He's really out of touch with reality.
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The usual fear-mongering Harper Government "we need to monitor everything, because that's working out so well for the US!" crap. And of course, all this amid the revelations that the Canadian intelligence apparatus is illegally spying on Canadians and millions of other internet users worldwide.
 
The House of Commons debate over Bill C-51, the anti-terrorism bill, began yesterday with strong opposition from the NDP, disappointing support from the Liberals, and an effort to politicize seemingly any criticism or analysis from the Conservative…
The House of Commons debate over Bill C-51, the anti-terrorism bill, began yesterday with strong opposition from the NDP, disappointing support from the Liberals, and an effort to politicize seemingly any criticism or analysis from the Conservative government. With the government already serving notice that it will limit debate, the hopes for a non-partisan, in-depth analysis of the anti-terrorism legislation may have already been dashed. This is...
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Heave Steve!!!!
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A great read, with a lot of points I had honestly never considered.

H/T to +Dean Reimer 
 
If Corporations Are People, They Should Act Like It http://trib.al/P4eQ6aF
Companies deserve many of the same rights as citizens, but must also shoulder the same responsibilities
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...don't they?
If you look closely at how corporations act it is very similar to that of people (certainly men). For example:
People - Ego, blame, excuse, opinion and bad predictions.
Corporations - Ego, blame, excuse, opinion and bad predictions.
Did I miss anything?
#StevePronger #YourBrainIsOutToScrewYou
www.steveprongerbooks.com
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So well known author William Gibson shared the link to this site on Twitter last night, and it was impressive to watch a DDoS on a major data center in Missouri happen in real-time.
Norse Dark Intelligence. Every second, Norse collects and analyzes live threat intelligence from darknets in hundreds of locations in over 40 countries. The attacks shown are based on a small subset of live flows against the Norse honeypot infrastructure, representing actual worldwide cyber ...
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Well +mike quinn and +Mark Holcroft, I'm trying to do my part. ;)
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+Ian Emmons Haha, I suppose there could have been. Probably would have been tossed out of court though.
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Hey +daniël bosold, can you take a look at this and tell me whether this is speculative, or actually confirmed? Hoping I'll see more elsewhere soon.

H/T to +Bill Schieken of CXHairs
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+Geoff Williams I don't disagree with you, but there are certainly lot of folks who do both currently, at least to some degree. The highest profile of which would be Vos of course.
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You can always count on the Chicago PD for a good story...
Exclusive: Secret interrogation facility reveals creeping aspects of war on terror in US city as accounts describe shackling and brutality without basic rights
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A fun chat between Marianne Vos and Sanne Cant in the Vier.be caravan.
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Sprocket and Chain

Here's a short film about our local CX scene put together by a racer and film student, Zachary Peters. Definitely worth checking out if you like CX!
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very cool!
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As a measles outbreak spreads across the US, with 14 states now affected, the advocates of letting deadly epidemics run wild are finding themselves suddenly unpopular:

Members of the anti-vaccine movement said the public backlash had terrified many parents. “People are now afraid they’re going to be jailed,” said Barbara Loe Fisher, the president of the National Vaccine Information Center, a clearinghouse for resisters. “I can’t believe what I’m seeing. It’s gotten so out of hand, and it’s gotten so vicious.”

This is not, to be honest, an unreasonable fear: it turns out that when you recklessly engage in conduct which places another person (or the general public) in danger of death or serious bodily injury, you may well have a reason to fear that people might want you to go to jail. The technical term is "reckless endangerment." And when people -- especially children -- start actually dying because of your actions, you may well have reason to fear that your neighbors may suggest that you find some other neighbors, starting right away.

The reaction to this outbreak has, however, offered me some real hope. I suspect that as soon as people remember just why people were so terrified of these diseases, the popularity of the "anti-vaccine" movement is likely to plummet, largely at the hands of people who don't feel like being put in mortal danger by their neighbors' fears. Hopefully, this movement will be gone and forgotten before too many people die. (But I want to be honest here: people are going to die. Mostly kids.)

We should recognize that there are real access problems in some parts of the country: the government pays for vaccines but not the doctor's time, and if you get paid by the hour and don't have a car, simply the time to go to the doctor is a major factor. But we know how to fix these problems: the mobile vaccination stations that helped end the polio epidemic of the 1950's are proof of that.

The best proof by far, though, is that some states are doing a great job to this day. It turns out that the winner is Mississippi, which has managed to achieve a 99.7% immunization rate for the most serious diseases! They've done this through a combination of a strong public health program and not messing around with their laws. You can read more about what they've done, and how they stack up against other states, at http://wpo.st/QKT20 .

I suggest a three-point strategy:

(1) Make sure that the CDC-approved vaccine schedule is available to every person. Task an agency with achieving as close to 100% coverage as possible; the only people who shouldn't be getting these are people for whom there is a medical reason not to.

(2) Educate the public about what's going on and why. Don't be afraid to pull out the old videos and show people of just why measles is not a "thing you just get over." 

(3) Starting in areas where vaccination is already reliably available, and ultimately spreading to all areas of the country, impose criminal liability for the deliberate failure to vaccinate without medical reason, under existing laws for reckless endangerment and/or child endangerment. 

My parents and their generation got to watch their families and their friends die from these diseases. I don't want to do the same.


h/t to +Kyla Myers for the WaPo article about Mississippi's success. Another very interesting article to read is http://goo.gl/BYp3iF, from the Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, which goes through the reasons why people aren't getting vaccinated and proposes several ways to help fix it. Thanks to +James Salsman for that one.

Special thanks to +Steve Esterly for his thorough critique of a previous version of this post, and in particular catching that I had misinterpreted the JAAPA article in a rather important way. 
As officials in 14 states grapple with a measles outbreak, the parents at the heart of America’s anti-vaccine movement are being blamed for a public-health crisis.
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x and y and z and r and q and a thousand other flu viruses are running around right now.  They attempt to predict which 3-5 will be the worst threat in a given year to vaccinate against.  It's not even remotely possible to protect against all strains equally, so you pick and choose and help a little rather than helping none.

I've never seen anyone mis-use the word "condone" so completely.  Our economy is based on capitalism, our government is a recognition that some social programs are necessary to maintain the existence of a society.  Neither one of them is doing an awesome job, but they are what we have.

Neil would be sad that you're using his statement this way.  If you want to question it, by all means do some research.  But I don't mean "google a bunch of things and read shit online until you believe you know something," I mean actual research with actual science involved.  A sociological study of the impact of the vaccine would be possible without an advanced degree in pharmacology, maybe you could start there.

You've made the claim, please back it up. Can you show me one scrap of evidence of these "terrible side effects" happening to 1 in 125 people, preferably with an exact description of the side effects and what makes them terrible?

And so far as the herd paying expenses, it does.  Every health insurance carrier covers vaccinations, including the flu vaccine, at 100%.  If you have health insurance, and you either do have that or chose to pay a penalty for not having it, then the herd is paying for your vaccination.
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Wow. The whole world needs more ads like this!
 
New Sport England campaign for encouraging women back into activity. Normal looking people doing normal exercise things. I like.
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Such a fantastic shift in the mindset!  Absolutely wonderful....
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Christian, geek, nerd, gamer, privacy advocate, sometime coder, IT-worker, cat-lover, paintballer and cyclist.
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6 years in retail, another year in a call center and I'm still a well adjusted, sociable person. *evil laugh*
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