Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Darrell Hudson
A brief description
A brief description
About
Darrell's posts

Post has shared content
Haha, now that is cutting it close and with precision. 

Post has shared content
Happy #plus3 Google+
This is a picture of some of the people who built Google+, but they are not the ones who make it. Those of you reading this do. And I want to thank you all for spending time with us and making this place your own. We've got a lot of exciting things planned for the future and it's been a blast hanging out with you for the last three years.  

Whether you’re into star gazing, boy bands, or football: you’ve all made Google+ an amazing place to explore the things you love, with the people who love them too. To celebrate our community, create a post and tell us: who are your people on Plus?

Here are mine:

+Michael B. Stuart, +Robin Griggs Wood, and +Wesly Smith. These are some of my many people on Plus.

Three years ago today we started the Google+ project. Back then I took the occasional smartphone photo, but that was about it. It was folks like Michael, Robin and Wesly who inspired me to be creative with my pictures. And because of their encouraging +1s, tips, and inspirational #bokehlicious  pictures, photography has gone from just a casual interest to my new favorite pastime. I've even been introduced as "that guy who takes pretty pictures of flowers!" 

#plus3 #findyourpeople
Photo

Post has attachment
Trey Ford, global security strategist for Rapid7, says LZO compression is pervasive. "You will find it in practically all variants of Linux and it may also affect Solaris, iOS, and Android. Note that some variation of the Linux kernel -- the foundation of an operating system -- is used in almost every Internet of Things device, regardless of function," he says.

But without specifics on the flaw and its presence in different implementations, it's tough to determine just how dangerous this may be, Ford says. "This vulnerability might permit bypass of signatures for bootloaders in the deployment of modified kernel, or perhaps a local-only kernel level exploit provided by a special dirty USB drive. It’s very hard to assess the possible impact without more detail," he says.

Meanwhile, Bailey says the flaw only scratches the surface of vulnerabilities out there in embedded systems. "We're going to see more of this as the Internet of Things becomes more prominent," he says.

And not all systems will even get the LZO patch or future patches, he says. "A lot of older projects don't adhere to licensing and may not be patching," he says. "Or organizations may have legacy systems and don't know the library is use in them."

The LZO bug has some parallels to Heartbleed, he says, but it's not immediately impactful as Heartbleed was. "It's almost as dangerous because it affects a wide number of platforms in a range of ways, with remote memory disclosure, DoS, and remote code execution with one bug," he says.

#InternetofThings #LZO

Post has attachment
The tech-heavy Nasdaq is creeping up toward its high point, reached in early 2000 just before the dot-com crash. It closed Friday up by 18.88 points at 4,397.93, its highest point since the spring of 2000.
Photo

Post has shared content
Meet Google Cardboard

#GoogleCardboard
Google joins the virtual reality craze ... with a piece of cardboard
Virtual reality is all the rage these days. Well, that is, apart from the fact that you can't yet buy any of the most talked-about VR hardware. But if a just so crazy it might work Google project has its way, we might all soon be walking around with homemade VR headsets made on the cheap. Meet Google Cardboard.

http://www.gizmag.com/google-cardboard-homemade-virtual-reality-android/32730/
Photo

Post has shared content
Happy Friday via +christina torres Like a duck lol.

Post has attachment
Google’s Chromecast team has found an interesting way to pair Chromecast streaming sticks with mobile devices that are not on the same Wi-Fi network. Pairing is done through inaudible, ultrasonic sounds, which should make sure that your neighbor won’t suddenlyrickroll your TV screen.

Google first announced support for off-network casting at its Google I/O 2014 developer conference in San Francisco Wednesday, and Chromecast Engineering Manager John Affaki said during a presentation at the conference Thursday that the goal was to make the social use of Chromecast in the living room easier.

Google’s YouTube app already allows users to build collaborative queues for on-the-fly YouTube parties, and Affaki said Thursday that the support for these kinds of queues will be added to the Chromecast software developer’s kit to bring it to other apps as well. However, the challenge is that users need to be on the same Wi-Fi network, and sharing Wi-Fi passwords can be cumbersome. “The initial step of getting on the same Wi-Fi network can be really complicated,” said Affaki.




Post has shared content
Looks good

Post has shared content

Post has attachment
Google is breaking new ground and it's blazing a glorious path that will greatly benefit the platform going forward.

Developers and manufacturers will no longer be in the dark for upcoming firmware updates; by making a preview available, Google is giving its valued partners and third-party devs the opportunity to prepare their apps and services for the forthcoming refresh, which is due out sometime this fall.
Wait while more posts are being loaded