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Dante Johnson
Worked at Auntie Anne's
Lived in Alaska
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Dante Johnson

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I'm a huge fan. Also listen to Wings and Other side. 
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Well, this is a problem...
 
...warmth, or trustworthiness, is the most important factor in how people evaluate you
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My main issue (I think) is my lack of warmth. I'm not affable or jolly, or inviting, or any of that kind of stuff people like in most situations with new people. Weirdly enough, it's mostly easy when I'm behind a counter selling pretzels, though. But in general, I'm just kind of reserved and withdrawn.
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h/t +paul beard I am glad that these issues are being spoken about and taken seriously. 
 
Our Buttonwood Columnist Philip Coggan has been named journalist of the year by the CFA for his article "What's wrong with finance". Read the award-winning piece here:
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Lots of truth in this article. 
Don't be fooled: lotteries are rigged against everyone.
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Light up UCF 2015
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Yeah, my kids are doing common core math, too. Know what? It's pretty cool.
Well, there you have it. Right there in black and white...my reaction to seeing my 4th grade son's math homework, and not having a clue how to help him. It was
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Dante Johnson

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I have to say, I'm consistently impressed with MotherJones. They don't pretend to be completely unbiased, but they do provide thoughtful insight to whatever they cover, without delving into mudslinging and name calling. This is peripherally political, and allows for solid descriptions of multiple visions of the future with driverless cars.

I like what I read about efforts to reduce parking, but one thing kind of bugs me a bit. This bit here: "When developers are forced to build parking, the cost is folded into the purchase price, be it a home, an office, or a restaurant. And when people don't pay to park at the curb (only a tiny fraction of curbside spots in the United States are metered), it's the city that pays to build and maintain that spot. These costs are passed down to consumers and taxpayers, but since they're never itemized, they're easy to ignore. In my neighborhood in Brooklyn, for example, housing prices are sky-high, but the city doesn't charge me to park on the street. When I tell this to Shoup, he points out that if they did charge me, the odds are high that I'd never have bought my car. When a city provides free parking, it's also economically unfair, since it's a subsidy available only to those who are wealthy enough to own cars."

"...only those wealthy enough to own cars." That doesn't require that much wealth. With the fee based structure, people with $1000 beater cars pay the same as somebody with a brand new luxury sedan. Compare that to the current system of having people with enough wealth to own a business, or a fairly progressive tax system fund it, and this seems backwards.
 
The deep irony is that cities rarely require developers to construct enough affordable housing, but they pass strict laws making sure vehicles can be adequately housed. 
Driverless cars will change more things than you know.
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"The uncomfortable truth is that state lotteries are doing more to amplify and exacerbate our growing inequality than they are to alleviate it. States use lottery funds to primarily benefit the rich, white, and middle classes. Thus, in many ways lotteries function as a blatant reversal of Robin Hood’s motto: they systematically take from the poor and give to the rich."
 
Transforming the Unfairness of Lotteries into Pilots for Basic Income

Great piece from +Scott Santens that doesn't just show all the ways that lotteries are regressive, inefficient and just plain unfair - but also paints a vision for using the lottery structure as a way to pave the path to Basic Income. 

#basicincome   #lottery  
State lotteries take from the poor to give to the rich, but we have options and there is a game-changing alternative
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"What’s crazy — and unintuitive — is that as the Jackpot rises higher and higher, because more and more tickets get sold, the less valuable each ticket becomes! A ticket sold for a $1,500 million (or $1.5 billion) Jackpot, in fact, would only be worth about half as much as a ticket sold for a $500 million Jackpot, because you’d most likely have to split the Jackpot, even if you won, with between three and seven other people. And that’s probably what’s going to happen tonight."

Later today, the richest lottery drawing in history — the $1.5 billion Powerball jackpot — will take place. While many outlets are encouraging people to purchase as many tickets as possible, it’s important to run through the mathematics and find out what your expected value is for each ticket. While a naive analysis shows that a jackpot in excess of about $245 million would lead to a break-even-or-better result, when you factor in taxes and split jackpots, you find that even for the $1.5 billion jackpot, your $2 ticket is only worth about $0.85.
As the jackpot crests $1 billion for the first time, it's time to examine the scientific answer to the ultimate question: is it worth it to play?
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I believe (at least math) common core addresses some of these issues. Also, flipping the classroom was supposed to bring useful, engaging discussion inside, like the author is saying needs to happen. The comment about low level multiple choice questions seemed like that was never how it was intended to be.
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Snowflake-a-Day #29
Yesterday’s snowfall brought in some strange snow, and it was also very difficult to photograph. This is the first new snowflake of the season… and it’s a doozy. I can’t stress enough that you should view this one large and check out the details!
 
Resembling a glass pedestal, this snowflake is a capped column that showcases a lot of interesting crystal growth. Columns often grow plate-like crystals out of each side if the humidity increases and/or temperature decreases during crystal growth. This “beginning” is often seen in much larger snowflakes like the button feature on yesterday’s crystal. You can see here that one plate is already growing larger than the other, starving the smaller plate of new building materials; Like an umbrella, the water hits the top plate and little gets to the bottom.
 
You can also see a few more rare types of crystal growth, including “scrolls”. The top plate’s growth had begun to shift back to column-type growth, which would only form at the edge of the plate. This rising edge is uncommon in natural snow, and reveals how volumetric a snowflake can be in the right conditions. Towards the back, the plate had already begun to form branches, and the scroll wraps around those edges. The aerodynamic properties of the snowflake (how it’s spinning and tumbling on the air) likely caused one side of the crystal to start growing scrolls before the other side. Small scrolls can be seen starting to form on the bottom plate as well.
 
The bottom plate is malformed, which was likely caused by collision damage from other snowflakes. The storm we just endured had very high winds and MANY small crystals. Aerial collisions were clearly commonplace, and I even saw a hexagon plate completely snapped in half because of it. It’s very rare to find pristine crystals in these conditions.
 
The column itself has started to exhibit “skeletal form” structures, with spines growing out of each corner of the column and connecting to the plates, as if to increase the structural strength of the snowflake. The corners of a column stick out farther than the sides, and enough water vapour was able to sneak in between the plates to start to build up this part of the snowflake further.
 
Photographing crystals in these high-wind and high-volume snowfalls is incredibly difficult. I spent a few hours hunting through the snow, trying to find anything worth photographing. As soon as something interesting was spotted, it was often covered by more falling / blowing snow or melting. Finding it in the viewfinder is hard enough in the best conditions, so I’m lucky I was able to get anything useful.
 
This was the first snowflake I was able to photograph this season. May it be a sign of great images to come! All of the other images in this series so far have never been seen before, and were never edited during previous series. They’re all “new”, as I have a backlog of over 400 snowflakes that haven’t been seen by anyone but myself. I don’t need to photograph more snowflakes for years – but I’ll be out during every snowfall to try and find the perfect snowflake. :)
 
To see where these efforts have gotten me over 2500 hours in the past five years, see the results in a single stunning image titled “The Snowflake”: https://skycrystals.ca/poster/

To understand all of the physics and photographic techniques, flip through the densely-packed pages of Sky Crystals: https://skycrystals.ca/book/ - 304 pages that will certainly come in handy now that winter is here!
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Dante's Collections
Story
Tagline
Occasionally depressed. Rarely irrational.
Introduction
I don't participate. I watch, I observe, I listen, I think. 

I like to talk about thoughts and ideas and meanings. I try to make sense of things.

I find beauty in the combination of power and elegance. A flame, a tiger, a lightning bolt, a blade. I love the sound of rain.

Passion, dedication, and commitment. Whether love, work, hobby, or some other important part of life, greatness becomes more likely with those three ingredients. 

I believe that the deliberate spreading of misinformation by those whose role is to deliver accurate information should be a criminal offense.

I prefer games with clear rules.
Bragging rights
I type using the Dvorak keyboard layout. Jonathan Frakes (Commander Riker from Next Generation) took a picture of me once.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Alaska - Japan - Oklahoma - Florida
Links
Work
Occupation
Soon: Financial Planner.
Employment
  • Auntie Anne's
  • Panera Bread
  • Winn-Dixie
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Zuramed
Dante Johnson's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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Keeps track of the best Starcraft 2 video casted matches from all over the Internet

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