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Is Google being knocked out of iOS 6 the long-expected moment of Apple going "thermonuclear" on Google? No. In fact, Google's not kicked out in many ways that remain important. My story below explains more, how Apple's practicing more of a containment strategy and pondering if we might see a "Siri" search engine on the web eventually.
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David Moore's profile photoMichael Goasdoue's profile photoRay Cromwell's profile photoJoe Tierney's profile photo
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Ive also said on numerous occasions that getting apps kicked out of iOS by default could actually be good for Google and users as it then allows Google to work on "proper" versions much closer to their Android equivalents.

I also said after the WWDC keynote that the new search offered by Siri should also be available by text based search - so we're on similar lines here.

Just as the new Maps app is fed by multiple partners so could a Siri search engine be. 
 
Interesting analysis--and a lot more insightful than the other articles that I've seen on this topic.
Tim Box
 
Really good article! +1
 
Great post. Thank you!

I think the biggest loser with the move away from Google Maps is the iOS 6 user. Apple has kept Google Maps most useful features/updates from users for a long time now so many don't know what they're missing.

You mention search is not Apple's core competency, I think the same holds true for mapping. Mapping is at the core of Google's mission - organization, make relevant and useful. Mapping is a challenge that has always been at the heart of human civilization - the type of challenge Google loves working to "solve". Google Maps and Nav are going to be the best consumer options for a while still - obviously Apple might never catch up. 

No question iOS is a tremendous platform. No question Android is a tremendous platform. Is it more beneficially for Google to double down on Maps/Nav for Android or to have a team build/support a Map App for iOS? It's hard to know how many iOS users would move away from the default in favor of an app that may not be as integrated with the rest of device - would it be enough to be worth it for the folks at the Googleplex? 

Should be interesting to watch. 
Tim Box
 
I remember reading article about Google wanting data from Gmaps usage in ios and Apple not wanting to give it away. So I say that Apple was the one who said no to turn by turn as Google would get all the data it wanted.

Look for Google turn by turn when ios 6 comes out.
 
Google will probably release "Google Maps" on iOS 6... that way people can get the superior maps product they are familiar with.  

Apple should be ok with that -- since it's basically making Google foot the bill.... With maps directly incorporated in iOS, Apple was likely paying hundreds of millions of dollars to Google.  Now it's free :)
 
Well does the whole map situation mean that now google can launch a real maps app that is closer to the android version? Are they legally allowed to without violating apple's app policies? That would be a fantastic thing for the users. Maps is my single biggest envy for the android platform. 
 
I would hope Google has a valid anti-trust case against Apple if they disallow Google Maps in the app store?  but who knows I guess!
 
There is no way Apple could justifiably keep Google Maps off the iPhone due to other apps already in the app store. 
 
Oh, they could keep it out of the Apple app store alright, but who is to say that a third party won't create a version for a jail broken iphone.
 
I think you've got the roles backwards, by casting Apple as the US and Google as the Soviet Union. 

Apple in fact is being the insular, defensive, Soviet Union character in this relationship now by forging an Iron-Curtain of a closed ecosystem. For example, take maps. Google is going to put maps everything, on  the Web, on Android, on iOS, maybe even on Windows 8. Consumers will have the same experience no matter where they go. You see the same with Chrome. And Google will allow anyone to play in their ecosystem with few restrictions.

By contrast, Apple's moves into maps, or their Chrome-like features added to Safari are Apple only. You can't take them outside the Soviet Union.  

By adopting a 'love thy enemy' approach, and shipping Google products everywhere and keeping an open ecosystem, you target the citizens of the Iron Curtain even as their government attempts to remove choice.

Apple's "Containment" is like North Korea or East Germany's  "self Containment". It's a containment of their own citizens choices, while those outside continue to reach out to everyone.

I think on the issue of not competing with Apple, you've got to realize that Apple is a public company and sooner or later they will reach saturation. When that happened, they would be bound to get into Ads, Search, and the markets of their partners and friends, otherwise the stock would take a nose dive. Google was very forward thinking not to put their entire company at risk by assuming if Apple controls mobile, they will forever not compete in search or ads.
 
Very true. I like iPhone but if the google contacts dont sync up and I am unable to use google services I will go with Android. My data is with Google. That side is more sticky than the hardware. I will not want to lock my data with Apple a company known to make costly products.
 
I suspect the majority of iOS users will stick with Apple Maps instead of downloading Google Maps.

Sure, Google Maps may have more features but how many users make use of all the features in the first place? For me in Sydney, a lot of the cool Google Maps features are not available anyway eg public transport navigation, 3D, etc.

Consumers will use whatever is conveniently placed there and that is Apple Maps because it is good enough.
 
Google Maps public transit seems to cover Sydney on Android and Web. Apple's proposal to support transit is to have you click on a geofence which launches a registered third party app that has transit directions. That seems to be a pretty poor UX.
 
+Ray Cromwell I just checked out Google Maps on web. Nope there's no option for public transport. Only for driving and walking.
 
Kind of validates Google's reasons for going ahead with Android in the first place.
 
+Ray Cromwell Google Maps (Web version) has transit directions for the two cities that I tried just now: Minneapolis, Minnesota and Venice, Italy. (The Minneapolis directions were perfect; the Venice directions were unacceptable but not altogether wrong.)
 
how?  Google Now is on Android an Siri is on iOS... it's not going to kill anything
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