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Danielle Rojas
Attended Columbia University
Lives in New York City
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Danielle Rojas

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Sleeping Town

"Radiation. Government conspiracy. Mass hysteria. There are plenty of theories as to why the residents of a tiny Kazakh mining region keep falling asleep for days at a time, but no answers."

It's long, but worth the read.
Radiation. Government conspiracy. Mass hysteria. There are plenty of theories as to why the residents of a tiny Kazakh mining region keep falling asleep for days at a time, but no answers. BuzzFeed...
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Danielle Rojas

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Some science history, and a reminder that there's something to learn in every failure and success.

via +Irina Tcherednichenko
 
Junonium, Victorium, Occultum, Hibernium, etc. 

"In the popular imagination, science proceeds with great leaps of discovery — new planets, new cures, new elements. In reality, though, science is a long, grueling process of trial and error, in which tantalizing false discoveries constantly arise and vanish on further examination. These failures can teach us as much — or more — than its successes. The field of chemistry is littered with them. Today only 118 elements have been documented, but hundreds more have been “discovered” over the years — named, publicly trumpeted, and sometimes even included in textbooks — only to be exposed as bogus with better tools, or when a fraud was sniffed out. Their stories, sprinkled with stubborn pride, analytical incompetency, precipitate haste, amateurish error, and even practical joking, read like a catalog of the ways science can go awry, and how it moves forward nonetheless. Here are some illustrative “lost element” stories and their discoverers — and what we can learn in spite of them"

See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/03/false-discoveries-chemistry-progress-science/#sthash.Qa3ii68v.dpuf
In the popular imagination, science proceeds with great leaps of discovery -- new planets, new cures, new elements. In reality, though, science is a long, grueling process of trial and error, in which tantalizing false discoveries constantly arise and vanish on further examination. These failures can teach us as much -- or more -- than its successes.
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If there's something Siri does well, it's being funny.

via +Nico Nightowl
 
Zero divided by zero sounds like a simple maths problem, but when you ask Siri you might not get the answer you were expecting. Many people who use Apple’s built in personal assistant are used to receiving sassy answers from him. But this time, it seems Siri has gone too far and many Twitter users can't believe the newfound response.

Siri replies: “Imagine that you have zero cookies and you split them evenly among zero friends. How many cookies does each person get? See? It doesn’t make sense. And Cookie Monster is sad that there are no cookies, and you are sad that you have no friends.”

The Twitter comments (shown in the article) are funny.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/apple/11707910/See-what-happens-when-you-ask-Siri-whats-zero-divided-by-zero.html
The internet has become obsessed with asking Siri "what's zero divided by zero?"
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On it!

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Danielle Rojas

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I am not very happy acting pleased...

A rhopalic sentence or a line of poetry is one in which each word contains one letter or syllable more than the previous word.

I do not know where family doctors acquired illegibly perplexing handwriting; nevertheless, extraordinary pharmaceutical intellectuality, counterbalancing indecipherability, transcendentalizes intercommunications’ incomprehensibleness.

    (Dmitri Borgmann, Language on Vacation: An Olio of Orthographical Oddities. Scribner, 1965)

Dmitri A. Borgmann was a German American author best known for his work in recreational linguistics. Borgmann is often referred to now as the "Father of Logology", as he popularised the word logology to refer to the field of recreational linguistics.

Another one by Dmitri Borgmann:

I am not very happy acting pleased whenever prominent scientists overmagnify intellectual enlightenment, stoutheartedly outvociferating ultrareactionary retrogressionists, characteristically unsupernaturalizing transubstantiatively philosophicoreligious incomprehensiblenesses anthropomorphologically. Pathologicopsychological!

Honestly, I can't comprehend this one.


Source:
http://www.quadrivialquandary.com/rhopalic.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dmitri_Borgmann
http://digitalcommons.butler.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2942&context=wordways

Catalyst: https://plus.google.com/u/0/111288150615919574016/posts/Sb8ME3sjuCs
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Nice one +Timothy Gowers!
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3D printers making changes to everyday objects and fields, both big and small.
 
This 3D printed flute hits high notes better than a traditional flute. The flute was designed directly from mathematical models and tested in an echo-free room after it was printed. "The 3D flute functions on a microtonal scale and uses tuning rations that is different from the scale utilized by an authentic wooden flute. The microtonal scale enables the 3D flute to hit different types of pitches and harmonies."
3D printing is making its mark steadily and this time it took a step into another field, that is the music industry. In the past, we witnessed...
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Is the amount of sleep each of us needs genetic? "Using a forward genetic screen, the researchers examined thousands of mutant fly lines and isolated a gene, Taranis, which they classified as a novel sleep gene associated with a marked reduction in total sleep time. Moreover, when the Jefferson team tracked how Taranis interacted with other proteins, they observed that it bound to a known sleep regulator, Cyclin A -- suggesting that Taranis and Cyclin A create a molecular machine that inactivates Cdk1, an enzyme whose normal function is to suppress sleep and promote wakefulness."

As you may have guessed from the mention of "mutant fly lines," they're talking about the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.
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i've always felt better on a late sleep schedule, no matter how circumstances tried to dictate to me otherwise lol
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Make today a good day!
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Yes! Positivity 
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If automated hiring were to spread, taking into account the competition between industries to advance, I wonder what industry wouldn't take it on. There would, of course, be repercussions for both sides.

via +Wayne Radinsky.
 
Can an algorithm hire better than a human? "I look for passion and hustle, and there's no data algorithm that could ever get to the bottom of that. It's an intuition, gut feel, chemistry."

"A new wave of start-ups -- including Gild, Entelo, Textio, Doxa and GapJumpers -- is trying various ways to automate hiring. They say that software can do the job more effectively and efficiently than people can."
Start-ups say they can eliminate biases and create more skilled and diverse workplaces, but data science will probably need human supervision.
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I agree with you Danielle - hey how are you btw? Hope we can catch up - miss your motivation n inspiration 
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An example of someone who made a big impact without seeking recognition to continue.

via +Yonatan Zunger
 
Our history is full of silent heroes: people who did something to change the world, without great fanfare. Nicholas Winton's story only came to light in 1988, when his wife found an old scrapbook of his in the attic and pressed him about it. (Not that he had been idle in the years before that; he had been knighted five years earlier for his work for refugees around the world)

The world lost one of its great men today. But thanks to him, it has nearly a thousand more.
A London stockbroker in 1938, he rescued 669 youngsters from Czechoslovakia but then said nothing about his deeds for 50 years.
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Character matters (and saves lives).
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Having only attended public school, I don't currently see meditation fitting into the schedule of such a test-targeted curriculum. However, given that schooling is not only about learning but also personal growth, I'd like to see this integrated somehow, perhaps as part of an already existing elective. It's worth a try to shape more conscious individuals.

via +David chung
 
New research in the fields of psychology, education and neuroscience shows teaching meditation in schools is having positive effects on students' well-being, social skills and academic skills.

A recent meta-review of the impact of meditation in schools combined the results from 15 studies and almost 1800 students from Australia, Canada, India, the UK, the US and Taiwan. The research showed meditation is beneficial in most cases and led to three broad outcomes for students: higher well-being, better social skills and greater academic skills.

#meditation  
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Plans are in place to 3D print a steel bridge over a canal in Amsterdam. "In fall of 2017, they'll set up robots on opposite banks of a canal in Amsterdam (final design and location TBD) and hit the print button. Over the course of two months, the robots will simultaneously print the bridge from each bank, eventually meeting in the middle to join the halves. The finished bridge will measure 24 feet long." The bridge will be made by 6-axis computer-guided robotic arms tipped with welders.
Can robotic arms 3D print a steel bridge in Amsterdam? Dutch design company, MX3D, aims to find out.
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Scientists recovered memories in mice that were suppressed or lost due to brain trauma through optogenetics. Not only does the study show memories can be retrieved, it emphasizes they don't leave.
Mice with amnesia could recall specific training after having their memories jogged by blue lights — the first time researchers have been able to suppress a memory and then restore it in an animal....
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Wow... 
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Story
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Lover of technology, the mind, and a good story.
Introduction
Hi, my name is Danielle. I am not a fan of introductions because the only way to truly know a person is through conversation, not a paragraph of characteristics. With that said, there are two things you need to know about me:
 
Part one: I love to read and do it obsessively.
 
Part two: Bookworms like me aren't just dreamers. We're teaching ourselves how to live. Narratives have formed my character, and will continue to do so in every chapter of my life.
 
If you choose to circle me, be warned that I do not have a set theme. Sometimes I post about Google (very often actually), sometimes the mind&brain, sometimes books, sometimes images I drew for  DrawSomething (the game), and sometimes food. There might also be the occasional "look at how adorable my sister is" post, or a share of something I found funny/interesting. I think it goes without saying (but I'll say it anyway) that this is a personal account; the posts are reflective of my opinions and interests, and not that of my employer or institution. 
 
I love discussions so please feel free to share your opinions on my post, whether you agree or disagree. If you find yourself with some extra time, be sure to check out my blog too.
 
Have a nice day, and don't forget to smile!
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I don't use Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, or any other social media -- only Google+. That's a plus!
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  • Columbia University
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