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Daniel Yokomizo
Lives in São Paulo, Brazil
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Daniel Yokomizo

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It appears that +SourceForge took over the control of the 'GIMP for Windows' account and is now distributing an ads-enabled installer of GIMP. They also locked out original owner of the account, Jernej Simončič, who has been building the Windows versions of GIMP for our project for years.

So far they haven't replied to provide explanations. Therefore, we remind you again that GIMP only provides builds for WIndows via its official Downloads page.
Source for version 2.8 (Stable). GIMP releases available from gimp.org and its mirrors contain the source code and have to be compiled in order to be installed on your system. For instructions, how to build GIMP from source code, please see this page.
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Daniel Yokomizo

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Beautiful!

"Noether’s Theorem proves that for every invariant, there is a corresponding conservation law. She also proved the converse, meaning that for every conservation law there must be an invariant behind it."

"The theorem shows that conservation of energy is equivalent to time invariance in classical physics."

"It shows that momentum conservation is equivalent to spatial invariance."

"the conservation of charge is related to a gauge symmetry, a complex mathematical symmetry in the equations of electrodynamics."

and so on... all while being kicked out of universities, lectures and study groups for being a woman.
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Daniel Yokomizo

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Beautiful origami collection.
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Explore Hoàng Tiến Quyết's 93 photos on Flickr!
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Frank Atanassow originally shared to Atheism:
 
I'm tired of seeing "Atheist 0wnz Creationist" videos pop up on my "Recommended videos" on Youtube. This guy responds to Creationists' questions intelligently, civilly and enthusiastically. Kudos.

Science isn't only about answering questions, but also about asking them. If you believe in rationality and the scientific method, you ought to treat other people's expressing doubts as an opportunity, not a nuisance -- not just to convince them, but also to test your own understanding and to look for flaws in the theory itself. TomWalksThrough exhibits the right spirit.
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The best physics results are those that explain tiny or huge things using human sized evidence.
Brian Koberlein originally shared to Our Universe:
 
Shake, Rattle and Roll

If you’ve ever watched dust-motes dancing in a sunbeam then you’ve observed Brownian motion. It is the jerky, fluttering motion of particles in fluids such as air or water. While the effect was known as least since the ancient Greeks, it is named after the botanist Robert Brown, who in 1827 first described the motion in detail. He demonstrated that it was not caused by some living organism, but was never able to determine its cause. While there were suspicions that the motion was caused by the collision of atoms against the particles, it wasn’t confirmed until Einstein’s 1905 paper “Investigations on the theory of Brownian Movement.”

Although it’s now common knowledge that things are made up of atoms, the idea was long seen as controversial. In the early 1800s John Dalton proposed that matter consists of indestructible spherical particles known as atoms, and that these atoms came in various types called elements. Dalton was mainly trying to address the fact that chemical reactions between different types of materials (elements) seemed to occur in particular ratios. The atomic model explained this process well, but required atoms to be so extraordinarily tiny that we had no hope of observing them. By the late 1800s Ludwig Boltzmann had expanded the idea into a kinetic theory of gases, in which he proposed that the properties of a gas, such as its temperature and pressure, were due to the the motion and interactions of atoms and molecules. This provided a theoretical way to connect heat (thermodynamics) with the Newtonian ideas of work and energy.

Throughout the 1800s, scientists were divided between “atomists” such as Dalton and Boltzmann, and their opponents such as Ernst Mach. At the heart of the debate was the fact that atoms couldn’t be measured. You could speculate about their existence all you wanted, but the atomic hypothesis was untestable. Which brings us to Einstein’s paper on brownian motion. Einstein wasn’t the first to propose atomic collisions as a solution to brownian motion, but what made his paper so powerful was that it connected physical properties of atoms to something we could actually measure. His paper focuses on a property of fluids known as diffusion. If you put drops of food coloring in water, it will spread out over time. This is due to the fact that the coloring is bouncing around with the water molecules. Since the molecule collisions are random, the coloring will move with a pattern known as a random walk. You can think of it as taking a step, then turning in a random direction and taking another. On average the position of the coloring will stay the same, but by chance some will drift outward. Thus, over time the coloring diffuses.

What Einstein showed was that the diffusion of an object undergoing Brownian motion will diffuse at a particular rate (known as the mean squared displacement), and that this rate depended upon the number of atoms or molecules in a mole of the fluid in which the object is suspended (Avogadro’s number). From this one could determine the size of molecules or atoms. For the first time, a measurable quantity allowed us to probe the atomic realm. It wasn’t just the idea, but rather the precision of Einstein’s results that many scientists found so convincing.

Einstein’s work settled a dispute that had raged for nearly a century, and it placed kinetic theory on an experimental foundation. From this work, Newtonian physics, chemistry, and thermodynamics were connected.

Tomorrow: Not content with bringing together three separate areas of science, Einstein takes on the the bizarre realm of the quantum with the photoelectric effect.

Paper: Einstein, Albert. Über die von der molekularkinetischen Theorie der Wärme geforderte Bewegung von in ruhenden Flüssigkeiten suspendierten Teilchen. Annalen der Physik 17 (8): 549–560 (1905)
Einstein's theory of Brownian motion gave atoms an experimental footing, and brought together Newtonian mechanics with chemistry and thermodynamics.
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Daniel Yokomizo

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“Sound familiar, anyone? http://t.co/Qk99p3wONI This 'new' insight is almost 2,000 years old... via @drhamedkhan”
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> There are lots of different ship classes in science fiction, and I’m not talking about the designated name for a particular frame (like Victory-class or Firefly-class).  I’m talking about classification of ship roles.  You have your cruisers, your destroyers, your frigates and corvettes, your dreadnoughts, and all sorts of other roles.  But something that always confused me is exactly what the differences are between them.  If you had shown me two ships and claimed one was a destroyer and one was a cruiser I wouldn’t have really understood what that actually means and what roles they employ in a battle.  How is a battleship different from a battlecruiser?  Is there any difference between a star cruiser and an assault cruiser, and if so what is it?

> So like any good geek I did research and actually enjoyed doing it!  And the knowledge I’ve gained I want to spread for anyone who is interested, whether that be due to simple curiosity or you’re developing a story or RPG setting.  Because knowledge is power.
Yup, spaceships again.  Between Star Citizen, the new Halo, the new Star Wars, a couple of key mods for Sins of a Solar Empire that I keep up with and have done some voice work on, and Destiny, my ...
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Do you have an idea to improve programming? Do you want constructive criticism? Submit to the Future Programming Workshop! The Future Programming Workshop (FPW) invites ambitious visions, new approaches, and early-stage work of all kinds seeking to improve software development.
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We are looking to grow the #MPS language engineering team at itemis in Stuttgart. If you want to 
* work with interesting language technology,
* work in domains such as embedded software or insurance,
* work with a bunch of creative and motivated guys,
then ping me :)
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Have him in circles
319 people
Maria Yokomizo's profile photo
Louis Wasserman's profile photo
Giuseppe Proment's profile photo
changsheng liu's profile photo
Ivone Ribeiro's profile photo
Torsten Bergmann's profile photo
JOÃO BOSCO SOUZA PIRES's profile photo
Itamar Collaco's profile photo
Comfort Ameyaa's profile photo
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