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Daniel Suarez
Works at Novelist
Attended University of Delaware
Lives in Los Angeles
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Corvids - Our Ancient Allies

I've always been fascinated by the unique intelligence of corvids (ravens, crows, etc.). Precisely why they're more intelligent than other birds and why they interact with us humans reveals something about the nature of intelligence itself.

It's certainly why I included ravens in my book, Kill Decision. Humans have a special symbiotic relationship with these birds going back thousands of years. They helped ancient people locate prey, and we helped them feed. Ancient myths the world over depict crows as tricksters, sorcerers, spirits and more -- but never simply birds. There's a reason for that. They're as special to us as we are to them. Here amid all the technology of the 21st century it's easy to forget the allies that once helped us on our way. They have not forgotten.

For those interested in the subject, let me again recommend the excellent book, 'Mind of the Raven'  by Bernd Heinrich:  http://www.amazon.com/dp/0061136050

#crows     #intelligence    #communication
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the raven, perched atop the tall conifers along the coast, would let west coast native communities know if a boat was coming.
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The neighbors built themselves a little ramp...

Shaun White built a 16-story tall snowboarding ramp (in 70°F weather) for a two-day event at the Rose Bowl. Artificial snow no doubt, but the engineering involved was impressive.
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I had to ask at KidSpace when I took the youngest there and that thing was under construction. Cool! Terrifying! Nope nope nope!
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$300 Million Bank Heist

In what's possibly the biggest (and longest) bank robbery in history,  Kaspersky Labs reports that since 2013 more than 100 banks in 30 nations have lost upwards of $300 million in a highly sophisticated, coordinated malware attack. Cyber criminals transferred cash to dozens of holding accounts around the world -- and they might still be inside bank networks. That means the total amount stolen could still rise.

#BankHeist    #cyberattack    #malware
Banks in Russia, Japan, the US, and Europe have fallen victim to a massive, sophisticated malware hack, allowing the perpetrators to steal hundreds of millions of dollars since 2013. According to a...
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The Krebs response is definitely worth a read-through.
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Traveling at Light Speed from the Sun to Jupiter

"This 45 minute journey begins on the surface of the sun, hurling you outwards at 186,000 miles per second, past the orbiting planets, the asteroid belt, until finally the sun appears as a faint glimmer among a sea of other stars." What's surprising is how incredibly sparse our solar system is. An interstellar traveler could pass right through it and barely know it's there.
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I doubt anyone would miss us.... all the EM we screamed into the void is bound to get us some attention. 
Whoever didn't yet read Blindsight might not see that all the EM might be nothing but spam to intelligence out there, thus a virus (binding energy for zero payoff). Bad luck, in that case. 
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The U.S. and UK paperback editions of #INFLUX are available starting today!

#Paperback    #English
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got mine on Friday :-)
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A Drone-hunting Drone

To be fair, having drones fall out of the sky without warning is of questionable value. I'd suggest that the first company to develop a drone that nets interloper drones and drags them away to a bomb disposal vault would really be on to something. That way, if it's just a photo drone, the owner could go to the police lost and found drones window to claim it.   #dronehunters
Are paparazzi flying drones over your garden to snap you sunbathing? You may need the Rapere, the drone-hunting drone which uses 'tangle-lines' to quickly down its prey
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Future Crimes by Marc Goodman 

I highly recommend 'Future Crimes' -- out today. Books about high-tech crime can easily turn into a horror show of reasons to stay off the Internet. Instead, 'Future Crimes' is a well researched and comprehensive tour of the vulnerabilities in mainstream tech, but it also examines where we're headed (think robotics and synthetic biology), and the implications of it all (there are important decisions to be made and soon).

Rather than focusing on black hat hackers sowing chaos, 'Future Crimes' spends a good deal of time talking about the many companies big and small tracking our devices and clicks in real time  -- all to up-sell us with ever increasing efficiency. No hacking necessary.

But this ocean of highly personal data persists, being sold, resold, and stolen into every corner of the globe--exposing us more than ever before to criminality on a global scale. And as we head into a future of cheap robotics and DIY synthetic biology, these vulnerabilities will only increase.

Far from a screed against tech, Marc Goodman's 'Future Crimes' is an eye-opening and urgent call to action to preserve the benefits of our high-tech revolution.

You can grab a copy here:  http://futurecrimesbook.com/ 

#FutureCrimes   #MarcGoodman   #InterestingRead
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FYI - Tomorrow, Feb 26th at 1pm PST +Tim O'Reilly  will be hosting a Google Hangout with Marc Goodman here:  https://plus.google.com/u/0/events/c7lf0pdvsn6nb0qj3cibnu6othc
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Artificial Light That Reproduces Atmospheric Effects

This incredibly realistic new artificial skylight could transform windowless spaces. It's also an elegant proof of how light interacts with Earth's atmosphere.
Access to natural daylight has long been one of the biggest limiting factors in building design - some solutions involve reflecting real daylight from the outdoors, but until now no solution has be...
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If the price is reasonable, I'd like to put some of these in my basement office instead of the florescent lights I have now.
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Farmers -- the Original Hackers

Farmers have always had to fashion ingenious solutions to myriad challenges. Nowadays they're being challenged by their own high-tech machinery. Modern farm equipment is essentially a proprietary computer system -- with a 'tractor engine control unit' (tECU) as its brain. But only manufacturers have the code to unlock the tECU. Modifications and troubleshooting require diagnostic software that farmers can’t have. Even if a farmer managed to get the right software, calibrations to the tECU sometimes require a factory password.

And here in the U.S. farmers risk breaking the law if they defeat the digital lock on their own equipment. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act—a 1998 copyright law designed to prevent digital piracy—classifies breaking a technological protection measure over a device’s programming as a breach of copyright. So, it’s possible that changing the engine timing on his own tractor makes a farmer a criminal.

Instead of wrestling with proprietary systems, some farmers are starting to go open source... 
I squatted down in the dirt and took stock of my inadequate tools. Over my left shoulder a massive John Deere tractor loomed. I came here to fix that tractor. So far, things weren’t going as planned. I’m a computer programmer by training, and a repairman by trade. Ten years ago, I started iFixit, an…
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this world is so fxxxd if you step back and think it over for a moment... It was such a relief to read Daemon, and see how things changed... Not by reverting technologie progress, but by powering it up and by changing the rules... Comeon Sobol, you can make it happen... Sigh... Till then, FamTech-Skill-Level2 is nice to have anyway!
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FCC Proposes New Rules for Protecting the Open Internet

It's early going (and the devil will be in the details), but this is a very welcome development. I've long thought that network infrastructure should be civic infrastructure -- a commons -- upon which commercial and social systems can be built. Recent rulings by the FCC that telecoms and cable companies cannot prevent municipalities from laying down publicly owned fiber optic networks support this view (see below). After all, if cities and towns are able to provide better speeds at cheaper rates, that shows entrenched gatekeepers were already taking advantage.

Pointedly: this FCC ruling is not an anti-business policy. It is a pro-innovation and pro-society policy. Consider public roads as an example; what business does not benefit from safe public roads equally available to all? Answer: not many. In fact, the ability for distant communities to stay connected and do business with each other reliably serves an overwhelming public good.

Safe well-maintained roadways can turn social connectivity into innovation. So, too, with the Internet. Imagine how different our society would be if every road was owned and operated by private interests -- entities might not want to 'lose your business' by creating convenient routes to locations served by other providers. You can see how unnatural and inefficient that sort of transportation network would soon look.

No, I say build the network as a foundation of strong civic infrastructure, and let the myriad activities of users and businesses occur within, not astride that connectivity. The digital network is fast becoming the fabric of society itself. Isn't it time we have a say in its structure?

Official FCC Commission Document:
http://www.fcc.gov/document/chairman-wheeler-proposes-new-rules-protecting-open-internet

Recent FCC Chairman statement on local networks:
http://www.muninetworks.org/tags-173

#FCC     #OpenInternet     #EFF  

 (photo: flickr / cc / +Jeremy Brooks)
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No link-slaps in this thread -- especially ones with 'youtube' misspelled.

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The rise of fake engine noise -- it’s driving car enthusiasts insane.

Automakers are turning to a sound-boosting bag of tricks. Engineers have even resorted to amplifying the engine’s purr through the car speakers.
The growl from some best-selling cars and trucks is actually well-tuned lip-syncing or digitally faked.
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Cuban Youth Build Hidden Computer Network

Cut off from the Internet, young Cubans have quietly linked thousands of computers into a hidden network that stretches miles across Havana, letting them chat with friends, play games and download hit movies in a mini-replica of the online world that most can't access.
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I was initially surprised that they didn't use a mesh network, but I suppose this would be much easier to implement.
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Work
Employment
  • Novelist
    2008 - present
  • Verdugo Technologies, Inc.
    President, 1997 - 2015
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Los Angeles
Previously
Anchorage, Alaska - New York - Delaware - New Jersey
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Introduction
NY Times bestselling author.  Writes high-tech / sci-fi thrillers:  Daemon, Freedom™, Kill Decision, and Influx.
Education
  • University of Delaware
    English literature
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
December 21
Other names
Leinad Zeraus (my sometimes pen name)