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Daniel Selifonov
Lives in Mountain View, CA
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Daniel Selifonov

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Building a system on top of OpenSSL is a bit like building a system on top of the ruined Chernobyl nuclear reactor sarcophagus. Even if, by some miracle, you manage to decipher the API without losing your hair, it's so rotten on the inside that the whole thing could still collapse at any moment and poison everyone.
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Picking up my new Glass unit at the Google San Francisco office. #throughglass
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It was great running into you :D
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Daniel Selifonov

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Photos from Google I/O 2013, attached events, and my time in the SF Bay Area. Finally got around to sharing these. :)
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UPS delivered this this afternoon. Looks like I get more than one bottle. Thanks Google.

#throughglass
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Daniel Selifonov

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What's up +Duolingo ?
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Daniel Selifonov

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My Glass Explorer pickup at Google's headquarters in Mountain View.
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Have him in circles
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Daniel Selifonov

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On the hazards of setting up a blacklist:
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It's official and on the schedule now: I'll be speaking at DEF CON 21 on the gruesome state of current affairs in full disk encryption, and how we can do a better job. Looking forward to sharing my research so that everyone can be better protected.

#defcon   #defcon21  
Index of all the fantastic talks at DEF CON 21
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Daniel Selifonov's profile photoSteve Weis's profile photo
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Great. Looking forward to seeing your approach. We're working on this problem at PrivateCore and based on your abstract, you've been going down a similar path.
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A Google self driving car, parked at Cavallo Point #throughglass. Just need the cat detecting neural network for the Google[x] trifecta.
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I had some questions from friends of friends on Facebook with regards to my experiences as a #glassexplorer for the last week. My response is reproduced here:

"Glass is a bit of a paradox regarding connectivity to the world. The intuitive impression is that there's this computer on your face mediating reality and disconnecting you from it, but the reality is, people are already very disconnected from the world when they choose to disengage from the world and engage with a smartphone. Maybe Glass is no better in regard to the temptation to context switch in response to a notification, but the amount of time that the person needs to be engaged with Glass is significantly lower.

In our lives, and in technology, if things take much less time to do, people start to do those things in qualitatively, rather than just quantitatively, different ways. I'd predict that it will be easier to get information "satiety" when the engagement with the device is brief and satisfying. Certainly, there are people who fiddle with their smartphones as a crutch to avoid interaction during social events, especially as a fidget in the lulls of conversation, but that's a social etiquette problem that goes way beyond any particular piece of technology.

When I'm face to face with people, I accord them a very high priority in my attention. Wearing Glass will not change that. When the device is idle, it quickly fades into invisibility, both for the wearer and people who interact with the wearer. As I've talked to the Googlers on the Glass team over this last week, they've worked very hard to design a wearable computer that especially does not get in the way, and doesn't pull you out of what you're doing. The screen does not even turn on when getting a notification: there is just a discreet chime through the bone conduction speaker -- which itself is designed so that you do not need to cover your ear with a headphone and block out sounds coming in from the world. Since their design philosophy is all about the device serving us, and only activating when we want to allocate our attention to it, advertisement as we know it today will never be part of the experience. I think the advertising mechanisms on Glass will be more along the lines of searching for a nearby restaurant category, and getting prioritized results -- since the device is so unlike any other form factor, it will take time to figure out what would work best without detracting from the experience.

Finally, I think it's helpful to look back to the predictions people made about the iPhone and Android around 6 or 7 years ago, or Facebook around 9 years ago, or video games, or rock and roll, or any brand new technology going back for all of human history. A vocal, but small minority, had predicted doom and gloom, moral corruption, collapse of social systems, and so forth as a result of introducing something new. Then, you wait a few years, and those new things are now in commonplace use by everyone -- things we can't imagine living without. The arguments are almost invariably the same, regardless of what the new technology is, or what its potential benefits are.

I've contextualized this in terms of the curve of diffusion of innovation -- and started mapping these sentiments onto the different categories of the curve (innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, laggards). As an innovation goes through the process between invention and ever-presence, people react differently to that innovation, and everyone has a different place on the curve for different innovations -- though for similar product categories, these places tend to be correlated pretty strongly.

I think we should look positively on new technologies, and how we can build a better future, and worry/fear about change itself less than we do. I think Glass has a lot to offer, especially now that developers have their units and can explore the form factor to its limits, and it will be a success in the greater market upon launch."
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Israel Knight's profile photoNick Moline's profile photo
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Very well put indeed
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Have him in circles
126 people
Philip Torrance's profile photo
Mac TheNerdyGinger (Rachel)'s profile photo
JR Curley's profile photo
Lloyd Cledwyn's profile photo
Peter Teoh's profile photo
Jolyn Bowler's profile photo
linh my's profile photo
Lindsey Rae Johnson's profile photo
Cassandra Abel's profile photo
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Software Engineer
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Google Glass Explorer #368
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Mountain View, CA
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Minneapolis, MN
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Decent thin crust pizza, but not always consistent. Sometimes it ends up over-cooked, sometimes just right. Good variety of toppings, but I wish the cooking was a little less variable. They offer a gluten free pizza crust option (dough sourced from Mariposa), and the employee I asked about their procedure explained that they use separate cooking surfaces, ovens, preparation area, and strict sanitation procedures to prevent contamination. I haven't had negative reactions.
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Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
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