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Daniel Montesinos
Works at Web Ecology
Attended Universitat de València
Lives in Coimbra, Portugal
9,872 followers|998,307 views
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How about a journal focusing strictly on data, and not results?

Nature’s Scientific Data journal journal focuses on ‘Data Descriptors’, as opposed to results-based research articles. This serves as a way to preserve the datasets in a well curated manner.

To do this, they have partnered with the ISA-Tab community. Built around the ‘Investigation’ (the project context), ‘Study’ (a unit of research) and ‘Assay’ (analytical measurement) general-purpose Tabular format, ISA-Tab format helps you to provide a rich description of the experimental metadata (i.e. sample characteristics, technology and measurement types, sample-to-data relationships) so that the resulting data and discoveries are reproducible and reusable.


http://figshare.com/blog/The_rise_of_the_Data_Journal_/149?utm_source=Users+%2B+Advisors&utm_campaign=7d388f3383-figshare_integrates_with_Projects8_9_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e5f7149158-7d388f3383-92903757
The rise of the ‘Data Journal’
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New Web Ecology virtual issue is out! Plant–plant interactions: from competition to facilitation. http://t.co/dRCfGT9Cy9
F.-R. Li, G. Li, L.-F. Kang, Z.-G. Huang, Q. Wang, and J.-L. Liu Web Ecol., 7, 94-105, 2007. Abstract Full Article (PDF, 362 KB), 14 Nov 2007. Clipping herbaceous vegetation improves early performance of planted seedlings of the Mediterranean shrub Quercus coccifera ...
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Quantity of publications does not counter-balance quality, but it's a start
 
Ever wondered which country publishes the most scientific research? To find out, why not start the week with this infographic thread from Reddit - you might be surprised at some of the rankings! 
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Competition and invasions: evolving perspectives
http://evol-eco.blogspot.com/2015/02/competition-and-invasions-evolving.html
Guest post by Brechann McGoey. The field of invasion biology was sparked with the publication of Charles Elton’s book “The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants” (1958). Beginning in the 1980s (Simberloff et al., 2013), ...
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Life in the lab
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I wouldn't eat it +Justin Whitaker, although it probably won't kill you anyways :D
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The Google+ Plant Ecology community, curated by me, just reached 500 members, a remarkable feat for such a specialized community. Thanks to everyone! Have a look to it, and spread the word!
 
500 members!!!

A remarkable feat for such a specialized community. Thanks to all, and keep spreading the word!
Yes I drew 500 chickens on this sticky note. (Actually it's a megasticky note.) Why would I do such a crazy thing? To celebrate my 500th Savage Chickens cartoon, of course! It's been a lot of fun and I can't believe I've reached the 500 mark already. Thank you for all of your support and nice ...
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Darwin was right about inbreeding...  in his own family!

"Charles Darwin, who was married to his first cousin Emma Wedgwood, was the first experimentalist to demonstrate the adverse effects of inbreeding. He documented the deleterious consequences of self-fertilization on progeny in numerous plant species, and this research led him to suspect that the health problems of his 10 children, who were very often ill, might have been a consequence of his marriage to his first cousin. Because Darwin's concerns regarding the consequences of cousin marriage on his children even nowadays are considered controversial, we analyzed the potential effects of inbreeding on fertility in 30 marriages of the Darwin–Wedgwood dynasty, including the marriages of Darwin's children, which correspond to the offspring of four cousin marriages and three marriages between unrelated individuals. Analysis of the number of children per woman through zero-inflated regression models showed a significantly adverse effect of the husband inbreeding coefficient on family size. Furthermore, a statistically significant adverse effect of the husband inbreeding coefficient on reproductive period duration was also detected. To our knowledge, this is the first time that inbreeding depression on male fertility has been detected in humans. Because Darwin's sons had fewer children in comparison to non-inbred men of the dynasty, our findings give empirical support to Darwin's concerns on the consequences of consanguineous marriage in his own progeny."
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That's a good point +Gary Cameron. However, 30 different marriages seems a reasonable minimum. I am not an expert on this particular analysis though, but I am guessing that the revieweres at the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society were :p
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Hey everyone, here’s something I bet you didn’t think you’d see this week: a weasel riding on the back of a flying woodpecker! No, they’re not engaging in The Neverending Story cosplay. This incredible image, taken in Hornchurch Country Park in East London, captures the weasel in the middle of...
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great timing!  that's hilarious.
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The second most awaited event of your life is almost here! No, it's not your graduation, that'd be the first most awaited event ;)
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"Only" 27% of science articles are never cited, far from the claimed 90%

"Many academic articles are never cited, although I could not find any study with a result as high as 90%. Non-citation rates vary enormously by field. (According to actual studies) “Only” 12% of medicine articles are not cited, compared to about 82% (!) for the humanities. It’s 27% for natural sciences and 32% for social sciences"

This really is more in line with my own experience, where only very recent papers, or book chapters of very specific manuals for managers haven't been cited (see my Google Scholar citations https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=1_P3xw4AAAAJ&hl=en ).

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2014/04/23/academic-papers-citation-rates-remler/
It is widely accepted that academic papers are rarely cited or even read. But what kind of data lies behind these assertions? Dahlia Remler takes a look at the academic research on citation practic...
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Are scientists made, or born?

I could have written this, wood by word. Every time I have worked at non scientific jobs I have felt completely desmotivanted, as if I were wasting my time and skills. Not that those jobs weren't important, but I couldn't feel that they filled my life. It's such a relieve to discover that I am not alone, I was just born this way! ;)

" I can’t just idly wonder about things or hear something that doesn’t sound quite accurate without diving deeper.  I find myself up after the kids go to bed sifting through GoogleScholar to find the answers to questions that came up with friends.  I can’t help mentally devising experiments that I will never perform, reminding people that anecdotes are just anecdotes and are not generalizable statistically sound conclusions, and saying things like “well, actually research shows that ….”  while talking with other parents at the playground.  In short, I am a very annoying (though well-informed) conversation partner. "

Scientist by Nature
https://tenureshewrote.wordpress.com/2015/01/22/scientist-by-nature/
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People
In his circles
918 people
Have him in circles
9,872 people
Madonna Horse's profile photo
guy monighetti's profile photo
Dave brandly's profile photo
John Richardson's profile photo
Talus Organizers's profile photo
Parthiban Raja's profile photo
Toby Ziniewicz's profile photo
Jolyn Bowler's profile photo
Nancy Carrigan's profile photo
Communities
6 communities
Education
  • Universitat de València
    B. Sc. Biology, 1999
  • Institut Cavanilles de Biodiversitat i Biologia Evolutiva (UV)
    M. Sc. Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, 2002
  • CSIC - Universitat de València
    Ph. D., 2007
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
October 31
Relationship
Married
Other names
Daniel Montesinos Torres
Links
Contributor to
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Tagline
Plant Ecologist
Introduction
I'm an "exotic" plant ecologist interested on adaptations occurring to invasive plant species across broad biogeographical ranges. 

Native from Spain, so far I have tried to "colonize" places like Wales, Brazil and the U.S. I am currently based in Portugal at the Center for Functional Ecology of the Universidade de Coimbra.

I'm Editor-in-Chief for the open access scientific journal Web Ecology, and the moderator for the G+ community Plant Ecology, check them out!

Bragging rights
I'm a hobo with a Ph.D! http://www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1625
Work
Occupation
Plant Ecologist
Employment
  • Web Ecology
    Editor-in-Chief, 2013 - present
  • Center for Functional Ecology - Universidade de Coimbra
    Researcher, 2011 - present
  • The University of Montana
    Post-doctoral researcher, 2009 - 2011
  • Generalitat Valenciana - Vaersa
    Natural Park Technician, 2007 - 2009
  • CSIC - CIDE
    Ph. D. student, 2002 - 2007
  • CSIC - CIDE
    Lab Technician, 1999 - 2001
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Coimbra, Portugal
Previously
Missoula, MT (USA) - El Ballestar, Spain - Bloomington, IN (USA) - Uberlândia, Brasil - Swansea, Wales (UK) - València, Spain
Contact Information
Work
Phone
(+351) 239 855 238 (ext. 139)