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Daniel Montesinos
Works at Web Ecology
Attended Universitat de València
Lives in Coimbra, Portugal
9,954 followers|1,078,839 views
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Daniel Montesinos

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Daniel Montesinos

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Haters are gonna hate, study confirms

"those who already hold a lot of negative views are more likely to react negatively to new stimuli."

The whole "think positive" movement got it right after all!

http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2013/08/28/haters_are_gonna_hate_dispositional_attitude_study_confirms_it.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dD9A8x_xn5g#t=28
Haters really are going to hate. A new study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology corroborates the hip-hop and Internet truism that you just can’t win with some people. (No word yet on whether playas gonna play or ballers gonna ball, but we’ll probably find out soon....
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Also known as the "stick in the mud" syndrome. :)
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Daniel Montesinos

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It's time for a European-wide tenure track system

The head of the highest ranked young university in the world has called for the implementation of a Europe-wide tenure track system to stop junior staff moving across the Atlantic to advance their careers.

“For my generation, you had to go to the United States to make a name for yourself, to become a world-class faculty."

“If we can, in Europe, compete so that the younger generation don’t feel it is necessary to go to the US, but that they can stay at our universities and make their way up the ladder, I think Europe will have won.”

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/europe-needs-tenure-track-to-keep-young-talent-says-epfl-head/2020141.article
Continental system is critical to stop drain to US, Patrick Aebischer argues
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Daniel Montesinos

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is_invasive( ) got a new best friend: is_native( )

Exotic species lists will be always incomplete and hard to maintain. For most research questions the reverse question is also suited. Instead of “is exotic?”, you can ask “is not native?” Lists of natives species are easier to get and stable through time. Moreover, It conveys the message that any non native species is potentially harmful, rather than restricting to “worst invaders” or “known exotic species”.

So here it is. Its implemented for animals and plants in the US (using ITIS database) and for Plants in Europe (Using Flora Europaea)*. You can use it with the following R code:

install.packages("devtools") library(devtools) install_github("ibartomeus/traits")
library("traits")

#make a species list sp <- c("Lavandula stoechas", "Carpobrotus edulis", "Rhododendron ponticum", "Alkanna lutea", "Anchusa arvensis")

#ask in which countries the first species is native by querying in Flora Europaea fe_native(sp[1]) ?fe_native

#to see the help page.
#use sapply for querying all species at once sapply(sp, fe_native, simplify = FALSE)

#ask if the first species is native in a particular region is_native(sp[1], where = "Islas_Baleares", region = "europe") ?is_native

#to see the help page and country names used

#or all species at once sapply(sp, is_native, where = "Continental US", region = "america") sapply(sp, is_native, where = "Islas_Baleares", region = "europe")

#for america I am calling itis_native function from taxize package.

http://bartomeuslab.com/2015/05/07/is_invasive-got-a-new-best-friend-is_native/

Thanks +Bruno Moreira for the link!
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Video monitoring is a great tool to assess arthropod activity and diversity in grasslands

The authors compare the efficiency of three methods for potential use for arthropod monitoring in a protected grassland: pitfall trapping, quadrat sampling and video monitoring. Video monitoring was done on a 68 × 37 cm area using a digital high-density video camera mounted on a tripod. The sampling methods differed considerably in number of arthropods recorded: video monitoring (2578 individuals) followed by quadrat sampling (202 individuals), nocturnal (43 individuals) and diurnal pitfall trapping (12 individuals). Diversity of arthropod assemblages varied highly significantly among the tested methods with quadrat sampling yielding the highest diversity 0.70 ± 0.22 (Gini–Simpson index, mean ±SD) followed by video monitoring (0.57 ± 0.15), diurnal pitfall sampling (0.35 ± 0.28) and nocturnal pitfall sampling (0.17 ± 0.24). Video surveillance of the pitfall traps showed that out of a total of 151 individuals crawling in the vicinity of pitfall traps none of them were actually trapped. This study suggests that video monitoring has a great potential as a supplementary method for quantitative and qualitative assessments of arthropod activity and diversity in grasslands.

http://www.web-ecol.net/15/15/2015/we-15-15-2015.html
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Element uptake, accumulation, and resorption in leaves of mangrove species with different mechanisms of salt regulation

Element uptake from substrate and resorption capacity of nutrients before leaf shedding are frequently species-specific and difficult to determine in natural settings. In this article populations of Rhizophora mangle (salt-excluding species) and Laguncularia racemosa (salt-secreting species) were sampled in a coastal lagoon in the upper section of the Maracaibo strait in western Venezuela to estimate accumulation and resorption of mineral elements. Leaves collected fortnightly during 4~months within the rainy season were stratified as young, adult, old, and senescent. The authors measured changes in concentration of essential elements (N, P, S, K, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe) and Na (elemental analyzer and plasma spectrometer), leaf succulence (water/area), and specific leaf area (area/mass) and calculated relative resorption or accumulation of elements in senescent leaves before abscission.

Succulence was similar in young leaves of both species and increased with age, more abruptly in L. racemosa. Concentrations of N, K, and Mg were higher in R. mangle, whereas those of P, Na, Ca, and S were higher in L. racemosa. Concentration of K per unit leaf water decreased with age in both species; however, Na concentration in R. mangle remained at a similar level until increasing markedly in senescent leaves, whereas in L. racemosa it increased throughout the leaf lifespan. Relative changes based on leaf mass, leaf area, or whole leaf did not differ statistically. On a leaf mass basis both species showed resorption of C, N, P, and K and accumulation of S, Na, Mg, Ca, Mn, and Fe. However, R. mangle was more efficient restricting Na and S uptake, resorbing P, and accumulating Fe than L. racemosa. The P / N resorption ratio is > 1 in R. mangle and < 1 in L. racemosa.

Differences seem to be related to higher root permeability to Na and S salts in the salt-secreting species and to higher P requirements of R. mangle compared to L. racemosa. Results give a comprehensive picture of nutrient dynamics in the foliage of mangrove species with contrasting mechanisms of salt regulation.


http://www.web-ecol.net/15/3/2015/we-15-3-2015.html
Element uptake, accumulation, and resorption in leaves of mangrove species with different mechanisms of salt regulation. E. Medina1,3, W. Fernandez1, and F. Barboza2 1Centro de Ecología, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Caracas, Venezuela 2Departamento de Biología, ...
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Bike it!
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Daniel Montesinos

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The necessary acceptance of scientific advances

"I, too, was once in that activist camp. A lifelong environmentalist, I opposed genetically modified foods in the past."

"(...) climate change is real and genetically modified foods are safe." "There is an equivalent level of scientific consensus on both issues, I realized"  "I could not defend the expert consensus on one issue while opposing it on the other."

"for the first time this season, he had been able to stop using pesticides. This was thanks to a new pest-resistant variety of (GMO) eggplant"

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/25/opinion/sunday/how-i-got-converted-to-gmo-food.html?_r=0
We can’t deny the science: Biotech works — for good.
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Because GMO AND PESTICIDES are connected through Big Ag Tech. for good profits.
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Some plants are adapted to be pollinated on the full moon, for real

Most gymnosperms are wind-pollinated, but some are insect-pollinated, and in Ephedra (Gnetales), both wind pollination and insect pollination occur. Little is, however, known about mechanisms and evolution of pollination syndromes in gymnosperms. Based on four seasons of field studies, we show an unexpected correlation between pollination and the phases of the moon in one of our studied species, Ephedra foeminea. It is pollinated by dipterans and lepidopterans, most of them nocturnal, and its pollination coincides with the full moon of July. This may be adaptive in two ways. Many nocturnal insects navigate using the moon. Further, the spectacular reflection of the full-moonlight in the pollination drops is the only apparent means of nocturnal attraction of insects in these plants. In the sympatric but wind-pollinated Ephedra distachya, pollination is not correlated to the full moon but occurs at approximately the same dates every year. The lunar correlation has probably been lost in most species of Ephedra subsequent an evolutionary shift to wind pollination in the clade. When the services of insects are no longer needed for successful pollination, the adaptive value of correlating pollination with the full moon is lost, and conceivably also the trait.

http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/11/4/20140993
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Most papers accepted by one committee were rejected by the other, and vice versa

"About 57% of the papers accepted by the first committee were rejected by the second one and vice versa. In other words, most papers...would be rejected if one reran the conference review process (with a 95% confidence interval of 40-75%)"

"This result was surprisingly large to most people I’ve talked to; they generally expected something like 30% instead of 57%. Relative to what people expected, 57% is actually closer to a purely random committee, which would only disagree on 77.5% of the accepted papers on average"

http://blog.mrtz.org/2014/12/15/the-nips-experiment.html
This is a guest post by Eric Price.
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Evolution theory was written through these letters
 
Alfred Russel Wallace charted a great dividing line in the living world—and found his own route to the theory of evolution.

ARW was a man of many talents - an explorer, collector, naturalist, geographer, anthropologist and political commentator. Most famously, he had the revolutionary idea of evolution by natural selection entirely independently of Charles Darwin. 

Read the correspondence between ARW and Darwin online:
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/scientific-resources/collections/library-collections/wallace-letters-online/index.html 

#evolution   #history   #science   #AlfredRusselWallace   #darwin  
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How to p*ss off a scientist

If you spend a lot of time around scientists and you think you might someday want to piss one off, this is important stuff to know.

http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_magazine/previous_issues/articles/2015_02_25/caredit.a1500053
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In his circles
926 people
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9,954 people
Emilie Oakes's profile photo
Joe Sanchez's profile photo
Daryl Scott (The Dangerous One)'s profile photo
christopher j Lortie's profile photo
Amanda Cole's profile photo
Steven Clark's profile photo
Varada Veum's profile photo
Ernest Makata's profile photo
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Communities
6 communities
Education
  • Universitat de València
    B. Sc. Biology, 1999
  • Institut Cavanilles de Biodiversitat i Biologia Evolutiva (UV)
    M. Sc. Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, 2002
  • CSIC - Universitat de València
    Ph. D., 2007
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
October 31
Relationship
Married
Other names
Daniel Montesinos Torres
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Tagline
Plant Ecologist
Introduction
I'm an "exotic" plant ecologist interested on adaptations occurring to invasive plant species across broad biogeographical ranges. 

Native from Spain, so far I have tried to "colonize" places like Wales, Brazil and the U.S. I am currently based in Portugal at the Center for Functional Ecology of the Universidade de Coimbra.

I'm Editor-in-Chief for the open access scientific journal Web Ecology, and the moderator for the G+ community Plant Ecology, check them out!

Bragging rights
I'm a hobo with a Ph.D! http://www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1625
Work
Occupation
Plant Ecologist
Employment
  • Web Ecology
    Editor-in-Chief, 2013 - present
  • Center for Functional Ecology - Universidade de Coimbra
    Researcher, 2011 - present
  • The University of Montana
    Post-doctoral researcher, 2009 - 2011
  • Generalitat Valenciana - Vaersa
    Natural Park Technician, 2007 - 2009
  • CSIC - CIDE
    Ph. D. student, 2002 - 2007
  • CSIC - CIDE
    Lab Technician, 1999 - 2001
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Coimbra, Portugal
Previously
Missoula, MT (USA) - El Ballestar, Spain - Bloomington, IN (USA) - Uberlândia, Brasil - Swansea, Wales (UK) - València, Spain
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(+351) 239 855 238 (ext. 139)