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Daniel Markham
Worked at Bedford Technology Group
Lives in USA
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Daniel Markham

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E-gads! This is a brilliant idea! :)
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Nerd post. Layer 3 virtual network with PKI instead of IP addresses. 

I like this. A lot.

https://github.com/zrm/snow
Contribute to snow development by creating an account on GitHub.
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Wish I had more time with the macro.

Lost childhood. Mystery machine.
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Ever have one of those meta or recursion moments in a project?

Had a moment like that a few months ago. I was sitting in a room with a team putting together a release plan. The website needed a FAQ, but the team was pressed for time, so it was a matter of priorities.

One guy goes, "Okay, we need to add a FAQ, but people are going to have a lot of questions about it"

Perhaps the FAQ page should have a link to a FAQ page about the FAQ page?

:)
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Hmm. Looks familiar.
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Shark attacks along the East Coast. The Washington Post has a nice graphic about "What animal is likely to kill you?"
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Hippos kill 2900 people a year http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1862/are-hippos-the-most-dangerous-animal

That is world wide I think, but still beats out sharks by a healthy margin.
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He actually says more like 20 lines.
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Last macro. In her father's eye.
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Ever play presentation karaoke? It's something I played for the first time at Agile 2014.

Basically you take a hat and fill it full of slips of paper describing topics of presentations the audience should know. For our group, it was stuff like "self-directed work teams" or "TDD"

You draw a topic and come to the front of the room. For the next five minutes or so, you talk on your topic. The trick is that in the background there is a presentation deck playing odd and strange slides that advance every 15-30 seconds or so. Give your presentation however you like -- but you have to speak as if this were your deck and the slides are supporting what you're saying.

It's a great way to practice thinking on your feet. Also fun for extroverts and folks who use slide decks a lot.

I enjoyed it so much I went home and wrote a 1-day app.  It's not very complex and there's not many bells and whistles, but it works! And several times over the last year I've found myself bringing up the app and showing it to folks.

There's a lean startup/MVP discussion here as well You can get a lot of value out of a very small amount of work if you structure your execution carefully.

In case you're interested, here's the site: http://presentation-karaoke.com/
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So the slides are deliberately random. What happens if the speaker starts ignoring them?
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I used to be a big OO guy. Loved C++, modeling, components, UML, architectural tiers, and so on.

Lately, however, I've completely switched gears. I'm stripping away every possible piece of abstraction and complexity that's not absolutely needed to provide value.

Doing things that way, you usually end up being a big fan of the Unix Philosophy.

http://www.catb.org/esr/writings/taoup/html/ch01s06.html
(i) Make each program do one thing well. To do a new job, build afresh rather than complicate old programs by adding new features. (ii) Expect the output of every program to become the input to another, as yet unknown, program. Don't clutter output with extraneous information.
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For those of you who are technically-inclined, microservices seems to be the new hotness.

The Unix Philosophy is where I start any discussion of microservices. If we're drifting far from that, it ain't microservices any more. [insert long discussion here about how to actually use microservices in a big org without creating chaos]

http://www.catb.org/esr/writings/taoup/html/ch01s06.html
(i) Make each program do one thing well. To do a new job, build afresh rather than complicate old programs by adding new features. (ii) Expect the output of every program to become the input to another, as yet unknown, program. Don't clutter output with extraneous information.
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+Geoffrey Dunn I think you end up with caching and deferred commits, but you end up with them because you start with some general version the Unix philosophy. 

I am extremely concerned that microservices will be something folks sell a lot of tools for -- instead of something folks actually learn how to use. We have a bad tendency in the industry to pick up a buzzword, load in the expensive tools and specialist teams, then kill it.

Microservices, like DevOps, is something that should be owned by everybody -- and done with as little organization and tool overhead as possible. (But have a lot of engineering making sure things are coordinated)
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Was thinking today of things that are counter-intuitive that we run into as coaches. Things where, when you tell people who haven't experienced it themselves, they look at you as if you were crazy. Here are a few:

- If you take a small, simple project and add smart, capable, motivated people to it, you end up with a large, complex project that will take a long time to finish

- Truly changing the way organizations work requires trust, which requires time and a friendship. It's not something you do transactionally using vendors. You don't put a quarter in a machine somewhere and get real meaningful change out the other end

- Yep, two people coding actually work better and faster than each of them coding separately. I know, makes no sense to me either

- Those people over there in that other group that look like they're doing a bunch of stupid things? If you go over there and really get to know them, turns out they're doing the best and most logical thing they can do given their situation. And from their standpoint, you guys look like a bunch of folks doing stupid things

- If you want to get more results, loosen up and stop micromanaging. Instead learn to listen more and spend your time trying to figure out how you can best be a servant. Maybe that means washing cars, mopping floors, or learning to juggle. The more you focus on managing, roles, and position, the less performance you get.
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I sometimes run into people brushing off agile ideas as just "common sense" so I've done talks (read: rants) in the past about all the things that go against common sense.

However I want to give you a minor correction to "two people coding actually work better and faster than each of them coding separately. I know, makes no sense to me either". From the studies I've read pair programming will reduce the number of defects created (and not detected) by about 50% and reduce the time spent by about 40-45%. Sorry I don't have the studies bookmarked but it's an important distinction. Pair programming reduces bugs. Through that they may be faster (bugs cost time later) but without that considered they're slightly slower.
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  • Bedford Technology Group
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Hacker, Agile Coach, Reader, Hiker, Photographer, Pilot, and father of four
Introduction
Hey there. I'm Daniel Markham. You might know me from my blog, What To Fix. Or you might have seen me on Hacker News.I big into Agile and making teams look more like Google and less like the IRS. I founded Tiny Giant Books, the best place on the internet for Agile help. You might not know that I run a couple of other small sites, like one for Paycheck Stub Trivia and one to help folks with Neuropathy in Feet.

I'm always interested in hearing stories about small teams and startups, and I love reading a good author. I like long walks in the park, a warm sunset after a long day's work, and 

Sorry. Wrong profile.
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