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Daniel Lemire
Works at LICEF Research Center, TELUQ, Université du Québec
Attended University of Toronto
Lives in Montreal, Canada
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I do not buy into the paranormal tendencies, but the underlying science is amazing "Normal adults have no more than 5 % of the volume of normal brain tissue. While initially disbelieved, these observations have since been independently confirmed by clinicians."
The philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein chose as his prime exemplar of certainty the fact that the skulls of normal people are filled with neural tissue, not sawdust. In 1980 the British pediatrician John Lorber reported that some normal adults, apparently cured of childhood hydrocephaly, had no more than 5 % of the volume of normal brain tissue. While initially disbelieved, Lorber’s observations have since been independently confirmed by clinicians ...
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The brain does carry a lot of redundancy, and is very adept at adapting, especially for defects already at birth.

For instance, there is a condition where people are born without a corpus callosum - the large bridge of connections between the brain halves. This is sometimes severed as a treatment for severe epilepsy, and gives rise to a range of quite obvious (and fascinating) side effects.

But for people born without, the effects are almost nonexistent (the main one, according to a researcher studying this, is a relative slowness of learning nouns as a child). In fact, it used to be believed that this condition was very rare (less than a case in a million is what I heard). But now, with MRI scanning and other tools, we now know it's actually up to one in a thousand. The brain managed to compensate with other, subcortical, connections during development.

In a similar vein, I've read about cases with a patients born entirely without one hemisphere; and recently there was news about a woman found to have no cerebellum at all - and the cerebellum contains about 80% of all neurons in the human brain.

But note that while the people above led normal lives, they where not asymptomatic. They show various symptoms and defects (the decerebellar woman apparently had clumsy, uncertain movements). Similarly, I have not seen anyone claim these hydrocephalics are asymptomatic either.

And - this is my speculation - I would not be surprised of these patients are a lot more susceptible to problems as they grow older. Their brains likely have much less margin for error, and damage from small strokes, or developing brain disorders that would go unnoticed in you and me would show up clearly for them.
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In case you didn't know... there is a highly efficient rocket drive that is impossible according to the laws of Physics but works nonetheless (according to several independent tests run by serious people).
 
The seemingly magical EM Drive has once again been shown to generate thrust, without expelling mass like a conventional rocket drive.

Nobody knows exactly how it works; NASA suggests it's really a quantum drive that manipulates random vacuum quantum fluctuations. If so that would make me happy because that's always been one of my pet ideas for space travel!
The British designed EM Drive actually works and would dramatically speed up space travel, scientists have confirmed
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Well, while I can imagine this evidence ending up overwhelming and the drive to actually function in space, I can't imagine being satisfied without it being reconciled with conservation of momentum. The kind of explanations I can for myself imagine to make it more palatable, is if somehow the device entered resonance with an outside radiation bath so that the missing momentum is transmitted to the bath or to the enclosure of the latter.

Whatever, assuming it working the device would be paradoxical enough in its geometrical simplicity to deserve minimal inquiry over how to geometrically invert it.
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This man received a bionic implant to cure his age-related blindness
Age-related macular degeneration is the most common cause of vision loss in adults.
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One in five US children are living in poverty. One in thirty are homeless.
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Sugar is harmful even if you are thin http://www.bbc.com/news/health-33608726
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Well, that's been the common wisdom for decades, but older knowledge and new science seems to dispute it. There are records of fasting people running for days without food. Can't do that on a high carb diet.
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Beautiful technology. Worth watching the whole thing.
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"Great wars and empires, the insights of science and the revelations of religion – none of them transformed lives and civilizations as much as a few practical inventions." (McAfee)
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Electrical Nerve Stimulation Can Reverse Spinal Cord Injury Nerve Damage in Patients 
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Lose 5% of your weight in a week with this pill. (Serious research.)
University of Southampton researchers hope this molecule can be used in the future to treat obesity.
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While this is cool, interesting and potentially life-altering for many, I find the article's title and opening lines somewhat misleading. The treatment would provide only one of "the benefits of exercise" e.g. your cardio-vascular system doesn't get boosted.
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"Yes, the course will pay lisp service to the big ideas computer science is supposed to be teaching…" Clever play on words or awesome typo that you might not want to fix? :)
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Human beings win because they can flexibly cooperate in large numbers


c.c. +Seb Paquet 
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+Xabier Ostale
Humans can be called the running ape, since they and only they run on two legs. Between the arboreal apes, like chimpanzees and gorillas, and us are the walking apes, like Ardi¹ and Lucy².

¹ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardi

² https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_%28Australopithecus%29
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Maybe if we ate better...
 
Everyone knows women live longer than men on average. But did you know this wasn’t true until the 20th century? Most likely explanation: men are more predisposed to heart disease, but this wasn’t a problem until we started living longer and eating worse diets.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Jul 21;112(29):8993-8. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1421942112. Epub 2015 Jul 6.
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+Ms. Frisby  Good point.
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Work
Occupation
Computer scientist
Skills
indexing - information retrieval - databases - collaborative filtering
Employment
  • LICEF Research Center, TELUQ, Université du Québec
    Professor, 2004 - present
    Promoted to full professor in 2009. Funded by NSERC Discovery grants (2003-2007, 2007- 2012, 2012-2017) in computer science. Program committee member at major conferences (ACM CIKM, ACM WSDM, ACM RecSys).
  • National Research Council of Canada
    Research Officer, 2002 - 2004
    Founded and lead the e-Health research group. Designed the Slope One algorithm.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Montreal, Canada
Story
Tagline
Computer Scientist
Introduction
I have always been intensely curious and I am always scouting for new knowledge. I love to program and publish open source software.

I have had many jobs: researcher in a government laboratory, University professor, entrepreneur and consultant. 

I spent too much time on my formal education. It got me a Ph.D. and even a post-doctoral fellowship. But I consider myself to be an autodidact.

I have two great kids and a beautiful wife. I live somewhere near Montreal in a small house I love.

My home online is at http://lemire.me
Bragging rights
I drink my weight in coffee every day.
Education
  • University of Toronto
    B.Sc. (Mathematics), 1989 - 1994
    Graduated with very high distinction.
  • University of Toronto
    M.Sc. (Mathematics), 1994 - 1995
  • École Polytechnique and University of Montreal
    Ph.D. (Engineering Mathematics), 1995 - 1998
    Graduated in 2.5 years.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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In a relationship
Daniel Lemire's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Ronin Institute
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The Ronin Institute: a home for the independent scholar

Open Data Structures
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Tinycon. A small library for manipulating the favicon. Tinycon allows the addition of alert bubbles and changing the favicon image. Tinycon

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Stephen's Web, the home page of Stephen Downes, with news and information on e-learning, new media, instructional technology, educational de

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You have more choices than you think — The Endeavour
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You have more choices than you think. by John on December 10, 2011. This week Seth Godin wrote a blog post that include this gem: Remarkable

The new luxury
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Imagine, if, in today’s world, you saw someone jotting down notes in a meeting with a fine fountain pen. You know, the kind that has a cartr

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Sorry - this is an error page. We may have goofed, or you may have typed in a URL that doesn't exist. Try these pages instead: About Thi

…research shows that knowledge workers actually...
blog.vivekhaldar.com

“…research shows that knowledge workers actually have fewer good hours in a day than manual laborers do — on average, about six hours, as op

Knowing and Doing: February 2013 Archives
www.cs.uni.edu

It is a commonplace for anyone who has taught that we learn a lot more about any topic when we teach it -- even a topic in which we are ackn

Do we need copyright?
lemire.me

The concept of property is a social construction. Animals, such as cats, can own a piece of food, or a territory, but only as long as they a

Are Relational Databases good for anything anymore?
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Are Relational Databases good for anything anymore? (Note: thanks to Daniel for letting me use his blog. All comments, questions and critici

ON: ‘Fat tax’ won’t solve obesity | Canadian Taxpayers Federation
taxpayer.com

A not-for-profit citizen's advocacy group dedicated to lower taxes, less waste and accountable government.

ongoing by Tim Bray · Seasonal Shinies
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Seasonal Shinies. Search. Today we took down the Christmas tree. Christmas tree decorations. The pile of decorations is smaller than it was

Freakonomics: What Went Wrong? ~ Stephen's Web
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Stephen's Web, the home page of Stephen Downes, with news and information on e-learning, new media, instructional technology, educational de

Seth's Blog » Blog Archive » Duct Tape, the Eurozone, Status-Quo Bias...
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I Recommend. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen. The Man Who Would Be Queen by Michael Bailey. Feynman's Rainbow by Leonard Mlodinow. M

Seth's Blog » Blog Archive » Assorted Links
blog.sethroberts.net

I Recommend. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen. The Man Who Would Be Queen by Michael Bailey. Feynman's Rainbow by Leonard Mlodinow. M

Seth's Blog » Blog Archive » Steve Jobs’ Graduation Speech: My Opinion
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I Recommend. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen. The Man Who Would Be Queen by Michael Bailey. Feynman's Rainbow by Leonard Mlodinow. M