Profile

Cover photo
Daniel Lemire
Works at LICEF Research Center, TELUQ, Université du Québec
Attended University of Toronto
Lives in Montreal, Canada
23,038 followers|1,886,012 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube+1's

Stream

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
Governments are responsible for the introduction of trans-fat in the first place… now they ban it… 
The FDA's ban on trans fats (partially hydrogenated oils), though a good step, may lead to some unintended consequences.
3
1
Mihai Christodorescu's profile photoBorislav Iordanov's profile photoMark Bothwell's profile photoChristoph Nahr's profile photo
5 comments
 
+Shawn H Corey Read the article. The FDA did not advocate for trans fats - they just advocated for eating less saturated fat, a stance most nutritionists still would agree with.  As the article indicates, it was the  Center for Science in the Public Interest that advocated for using trans fats to replace saturated fats. The  Center for Science in the Public Interest is a private group consisting of doctors and nutritionists.  So how can you say that the FDA thought it knew better than doctors and nutritionists?
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
Ah! The freedom of being a tenured professor! You know what I am doing this beautiful Saturday? I could be swimming with my kids, I could be hiking, I could be reading a novel... But no. What I am doing is working on a grant application. I am totally free... in the way I work through this boring stuff... 
9
Mark C. Wilson's profile photoJérôme Darmont's profile photoDrew Armstrong's profile photoDaniel Lemire's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Drew Armstrong  Not personally, no, but grants are used to pay people's salaries... and these people, reportedly, like to be paid.

I'd be much happier if I did not need to apply for grants.
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
Bionic eyes are here and getting better, much better 
We now live in an age where radical technology can help the blind to see, an impressive enough accomplishment in its own right that gets even more mind-bending when you consider what's it means for the future. UV vision? Eyeballs that zoom in and out like a camera lens? It's coming!
8
Mihai Christodorescu's profile photo
 
We should demand that police officers wear bionic eyes instead of body cameras.
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
If we do not make radical medical progress, by 2050, Alzheimer's care will cost as much as defence in the US...
If life-expectancy trends continue, that future may be near, transforming society in surprising and far-reaching ways.
5
4
Franchot van Slot's profile photoSaravanan Thirumuruganathan's profile photo
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
We will soon (2017) create and give synthetic blood made out of stem cells 
The first attempt at giving human volunteers “synthetic blood” made in a laboratory for the first time will take place within the next two years, the NHS has announced.
3
1
Saravanan Thirumuruganathan's profile photo
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
Fascinating biology!
Most animals eventually get old and die. But a few lucky species don't seem to feel the weight of time, and just keep going and going
10
1
Valdis Kletnieks's profile photoDaniel Lemire's profile photoJessie Hartley's profile photo
13 comments
 
+Valdis Kletnieks  Please do not feed the trolls.
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
4
1
Leonid Boytsov's profile photoDaniel Lemire's profile photoMaxim Zakharov's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Leonid Boytsov Sure, we can cure any one strain of the cold. The problem is that we are facing an endless stream of possible variations. It is the same problem with cancer. So the best middle term cure is to keep the immune system in top shape and finely tuned. And that is what researchers work on. There has been human trials already...

The longer term solution might involve nanotechnology... but that is still decades away.
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
23,038 people
Indy Kochte's profile photo
mostafa olfat's profile photo
Rob Holmes's profile photo
Chris Visagie's profile photo
Karrington Atkins's profile photo
Jarrett Johnson's profile photo
Lars Falkdalen Lindahl's profile photo
Geoffrey Ackerman's profile photo
kiran nayak's profile photo

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
GM will be selling self-driving cars in 2017. Other car companies won't be far behind. If my aging Honda Civic can last a few more years...
As car manufacturers and even software companies work on self-driving cars, General Motors doesn’t want to be left out of the fray. At the...
5
2
Daniel Lemire's profile photoRandall Lee Reetz's profile photoKosta Derpanis's profile photoRobert Anstett's profile photo
15 comments
 
"Techno pessimism"? That's an even better example of cult think. Wow. I'm arguing for rational objective theory based science based predictions. Compare to the transhumanist singulatian Kapn Kirk mimic of every version of heaven and rapture ever proffered by religions and cults and the existentially desperate.
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
Wow. Exciting stuff!
 
on the plan to sequence all icelanders, to find patterns of disease.
In the ninth century there was a Norwegian Viking named Kveldulf, so big and strong that no man could defeat him. He sailed the seas…
View original post
11
6
Jeffrey Ullman's profile photoEran Toch's profile photo
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
4
2
Jan Schulz (jasc)'s profile photoIgor Merkulow's profile photoVictor Zverovich's profile photoDenisss Novikov's profile photo
3 comments
 
there is a nice post on a kinda neighboring topic on waitbutwhy: http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-1.html (there is also a second part, link inside) ... 
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
Fascinating read: 
These startups are trying to beat Alzheimer's, cure viral diseases, and kill tumors with gold. One common thread: funding from Peter Thiel.
8
2
Vincent Zimmer's profile photoSaravanan Thirumuruganathan's profile photo
Add a comment...

Daniel Lemire

Shared publicly  - 
 
"""Google has committed an investment up to $600 million into Calico  to do anti-aging research and, as Time magazine puts it, to “solve death.” Meanwhile, Mark Zuckerberg, Jack Ma and Sergey Brin (among others) have funded “Breakthrough Prizes for scientists who make discoveries that extend human life. Its $3 million payouts — given to six scientists each year — dwarf similar awards, including the Nobel Prizes, currently about $925,000.” Thiel himself has invested in 25 biotech companies and has funded gerontologist Aubrey de Grey with $6 million, partly for the work of the Methuselah Foundation, whose near-term goal is to make “90-year-olds as healthy as 50-year-olds — by 2030.”"""
It turns out that Peter Thiel quotes Hamlet. For Thiel, a line in the play’s second scene throws open the pessimism that runs throughout the tragedy and, in his opinion, our current cultural moment. “Thou know’st ‘tis common; all that lives must die,” says Gertrude to her son, Hamlet. Her words [...]
6
1
Mihai Christodorescu's profile photoChris Ainsley's profile photoDaniel Lemire's profile photoAlexander Nikitin's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Chris Ainsley  "I think that any research into extreme gains in longevity is among the most dangerous and unethical research that there is."

Amazing statement considering that the US spends half its government R&D budget on military research... 

"In cultures where children are favoured, and cultures where religion prohibits artificial forms of birth control, the only thing limiting new life is marriage and fertility start and end dates."


That's why Catholic countries like Italy and Ireland suffer from overpopulation in 2015 and its people are starving... 

"Imagine a world with a million people, and lifespans increased to 300 years per person."

Our technology in 300 years is going to be vastly different. We are unlikely to have the bodies we have right now. We are unlikely to reside solely on Earth... and so on.

Any extrapolation 300 years in the future that does not take into account massive technological progress is uninteresting to me.

"I think what you are citing is an observation, primarily based upon Japan, whose population is not growing more slowly because of longevity, but rather due to many socio-economic issues."

The association between high longevity and low population growth is robust. It is not just in Japan. 

"My point is not that immortality is something that should not be dreamed of, and even strived for eventually. It is that, right now, it would cause an untold amount of suffering."

1. Immortality is not in the cards... unless we can somehow replace our bodies and brain with something else, and then, for all we know, we could be living in space or on Jupiter.

2. Aging causes massive suffering right now. When did you visit an Alzheimer's center for the last time? What about a cancer clinic? 

I'd trade this real suffering for hypothetical suffering any time.
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
23,038 people
Indy Kochte's profile photo
mostafa olfat's profile photo
Rob Holmes's profile photo
Chris Visagie's profile photo
Karrington Atkins's profile photo
Jarrett Johnson's profile photo
Lars Falkdalen Lindahl's profile photo
Geoffrey Ackerman's profile photo
kiran nayak's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Computer scientist
Skills
indexing - information retrieval - databases - collaborative filtering
Employment
  • LICEF Research Center, TELUQ, Université du Québec
    Professor, 2004 - present
    Promoted to full professor in 2009. Funded by NSERC Discovery grants (2003-2007, 2007- 2012, 2012-2017) in computer science. Program committee member at major conferences (ACM CIKM, ACM WSDM, ACM RecSys).
  • National Research Council of Canada
    Research Officer, 2002 - 2004
    Founded and lead the e-Health research group. Designed the Slope One algorithm.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Montreal, Canada
Story
Tagline
Computer Scientist
Introduction
I have always been intensely curious and I am always scouting for new knowledge. I love to program and publish open source software.

I have had many jobs: researcher in a government laboratory, University professor, entrepreneur and consultant. 

I spent too much time on my formal education. It got me a Ph.D. and even a post-doctoral fellowship. But I consider myself to be an autodidact.

I have two great kids and a beautiful wife. I live somewhere near Montreal in a small house I love.

My home online is at http://lemire.me
Bragging rights
I drink my weight in coffee every day.
Education
  • University of Toronto
    B.Sc. (Mathematics), 1989 - 1994
    Graduated with very high distinction.
  • University of Toronto
    M.Sc. (Mathematics), 1994 - 1995
  • École Polytechnique and University of Montreal
    Ph.D. (Engineering Mathematics), 1995 - 1998
    Graduated in 2.5 years.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
In a relationship
Daniel Lemire's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Ronin Institute
plus.google.com

The Ronin Institute: a home for the independent scholar

Open Data Structures
plus.google.com

data structures, textbook, open-source, open content, open access

Tinycon - Favicon Alerts
tommoor.github.com

Tinycon. A small library for manipulating the favicon. Tinycon allows the addition of alert bubbles and changing the favicon image. Tinycon

Why experts exaggerate — The Endeavour
feedproxy.google.com

Why experts exaggerate. by John on November 26, 2011. Seth Roberts writes this morning: How can you tell when an expert is exaggerating? His

Preparing for change, expressing intent — The Endeavour
feedproxy.google.com

Many good programming practices boil down to preparing for change or expressing intent. It seems to me that novices emphasize the former, ex

Automated Essay Scoring Systems as Effective as Human Graders ~ Stephen'...
www.downes.ca

Stephen's Web, the home page of Stephen Downes, with news and information on e-learning, new media, instructional technology, educational de

Triangle party — The Endeavour
feedproxy.google.com

Doodling in Math Class: Triangle Party. Tagged as: Math. { 2 comments… read them below or add one }. 1. Harlan 12.10.11 at 08:23. That's

You have more choices than you think — The Endeavour
feedproxy.google.com

You have more choices than you think. by John on December 10, 2011. This week Seth Godin wrote a blog post that include this gem: Remarkable

The new luxury
blog.vivekhaldar.com

Imagine, if, in today’s world, you saw someone jotting down notes in a meeting with a fine fountain pen. You know, the kind that has a cartr

Nothing found for 2012 03 16 8-lessons-about-money-i-learned-from-my-fa...
feedproxy.google.com

Sorry - this is an error page. We may have goofed, or you may have typed in a URL that doesn't exist. Try these pages instead: About Thi

…research shows that knowledge workers actually...
blog.vivekhaldar.com

“…research shows that knowledge workers actually have fewer good hours in a day than manual laborers do — on average, about six hours, as op

Knowing and Doing: February 2013 Archives
www.cs.uni.edu

It is a commonplace for anyone who has taught that we learn a lot more about any topic when we teach it -- even a topic in which we are ackn

Do we need copyright?
lemire.me

The concept of property is a social construction. Animals, such as cats, can own a piece of food, or a territory, but only as long as they a

Are Relational Databases good for anything anymore?
lemire.me

Are Relational Databases good for anything anymore? (Note: thanks to Daniel for letting me use his blog. All comments, questions and critici

ON: ‘Fat tax’ won’t solve obesity | Canadian Taxpayers Federation
taxpayer.com

A not-for-profit citizen's advocacy group dedicated to lower taxes, less waste and accountable government.

ongoing by Tim Bray · Seasonal Shinies
www.tbray.org

Seasonal Shinies. Search. Today we took down the Christmas tree. Christmas tree decorations. The pile of decorations is smaller than it was

Freakonomics: What Went Wrong? ~ Stephen's Web
www.downes.ca

Stephen's Web, the home page of Stephen Downes, with news and information on e-learning, new media, instructional technology, educational de

Seth's Blog » Blog Archive » Duct Tape, the Eurozone, Status-Quo Bias...
blog.sethroberts.net

I Recommend. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen. The Man Who Would Be Queen by Michael Bailey. Feynman's Rainbow by Leonard Mlodinow. M

Seth's Blog » Blog Archive » Assorted Links
blog.sethroberts.net

I Recommend. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen. The Man Who Would Be Queen by Michael Bailey. Feynman's Rainbow by Leonard Mlodinow. M

Seth's Blog » Blog Archive » Steve Jobs’ Graduation Speech: My Opinion
blog.sethroberts.net

I Recommend. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen. The Man Who Would Be Queen by Michael Bailey. Feynman's Rainbow by Leonard Mlodinow. M