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Daniel Lemire
Works at LICEF Research Center, TELUQ, Université du Québec
Attended University of Toronto
Lives in Montreal, Canada
22,897 followers|1,828,821 views
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GitHub is getting spam now... it has clearly caught on. Next: we need spam detection for programming projects.
Online-C-tutorial-for-beginners - We are world best online tutorial website where students are taking all programming courses and also take to quiz test to know their ability. Our website Techguru lab offers free Online Tutorial for C beginners that will assist to learn fundamental concepts of C programming language. With Techguru lab, we will discuss what the basic need to start C programming language is. In this tutorial we wilI cover all topic...
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+Dominic Amann  Sorry about that,  but I have to provide evidence.
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I'm way more worried about people "thinking about their own future" than I am about people who (you declared) don't. What's rare are people who can think about THE future, regardless of what it might mean for their own life.
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It looks like Chinese hackers are currently attacking lemire.me and shutting me down. So not only am I blocked in China, but they now want to get me off the Internet for good... I'd really want to know what I did to offend them. I am not, in any meaningful sense, anti-China. I actually know little about China.
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+Daniel Lemire The conversion from WordPress to Pelican was largely automatic. (Part of the reason I went with ahead.)
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How I view intelligence...
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A modern-day curse: software updates. I was watching a TV show last night (on the net). In the middle of it, Adobe Flash player jumps up at us telling us that our version of flash is obsolete and we need to update right now. Meanwhile, on my main laptop, I start every day telling my Mac not to update. (The laptop is not smart enough to update during the night when I do not need it.) Last week, while trying to update my wife's desktop, we made it unbootable... something about Windows putting in the patches in the wrong order. This morning, in the middle of a presentation, a student gets a reminder to update his Windows box. In the coffee shop downstair, they have one of their ad panels with an open Microsoft Windows warning about a failed upgrade.

Meanwhile, my trusty Chromebook does not seem to need any update, ever. (I am sure it does, underneath, but it is not bugging me about it.)
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+Paul Mansfield Of course, MS well-known "ease of use". I wonder where that ease of use went when MS decided that alt+f4 was to be the most practical way to get out of metro ui and apps, that phones and notebooks are the same and that I should enjoy putting fingerprints all accross my laptop screen for the sake of "a new paradigm". IMO, downloading ClassicShell is the first thing one should do on a brand new 8.1 machine, even before starting to think about updating drivers and opening WU.
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Knauff and Nejasmic recommend banning LaTeX. I think that their paper is not bona fide science... 
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+John Regehr  The authors themselves write their papers in Word (obviously). You will find them easily enough through Google Scholar. I let you judge whether they look nice.
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Have him in circles
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Daniel Lemire

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We need more of these kind of studies : 

" The use of online videos and flipped classrooms is a natural fit for many CS courses, especially in the introductory sequence, and the use of these techniques is growing. However, the benefits of these techniques depend heavily on student preparation before class meetings. This paper presents tests of the effectiveness of basic multiple choice quizzes as gateway checks in a flipped classroom by looking at the impact they have on student grades. (...) Ignoring aptitude and learning approaches, statistical analysis of the student grades did not support our hypothesis that the gate-check video quizzes would be beneficial. "

c.c. +Mark Lewis 
Published in: Cover Image. · Proceeding. SIGCSE '15 Proceedings of the 46th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education. Pages 224-228. ACM New York, NY, USA ©2015 table of contents ISBN: 978-1-4503-2966-8 doi>10.1145/2676723.2677302 ...
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+Sverker Janson, one of the challenges that I have with using other systems is that we use Scala for teaching introductory CS. There are lots of systems for online quizzing and such, but most use Java with a growing number accepting Python.
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My sons are 9 and 11 years old. I would like to expose them to interesting mathematical problems. I found a few competition problems, but they are often not that exciting. Any pointers?
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Yes... I have one...DNA
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Yes... better funded researchers write more papers... but how much does it cost to increase the productivity of a researcher by 10%?
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+Pedro Silva  There is certainly some evidence in the literature for your first hypothesis. Your second hypothesis is interesting... but I am unaware of any study pertaining to it.
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It is a slow day, so I am mostly stating the obvious.
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Pah. Much simpler. Just draw five orthogonal red lines using blue ink. Then you're The Expert. ;-)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKorP55Aqvg
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CAPTCHAs are getting ridiculously hard. It took 30 minutes to create an Amazon account for my wife because we could not pass them. Two tech savvy users using a good quality monitor and we could not guess the CAPTCHAs right. I understand the need for security, I totally do... but...
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Ed Chi
 
Cc +Peng Dai+Igor Karpov​
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"The first Friday of every month I listen to all the “experts” on CNBC discuss the new jobs numbers. Today they were stunned by the fact that the recent upsurge in job creation has been accompanied by a slowdown in wage growth.  (...) most economists have never heard of a theory called “supply and demand.”  Instead, economists work with a theory called “the supply curve.”  Their (upward sloping) supply curve theory says that as the quantity of workers employed rises, wages go up.  I recommend the alternative “supply and demand theory.”  In my alternative theory when workers lower their wage  the labor supply curve actually shifts right, and you slide down along the labor demand curve toward higher employment and lower wages. "
The first Friday of every month I listen to all the “experts” on CNBC discuss the new jobs numbers. Today they were stunned by the fact that the recent upsurge in job creation has been accompanied by a slowdown in wage growth. We got a 252000 figure this month, and another 50000 from the ...
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People
Have him in circles
22,897 people
Jean Robillard's profile photo
Bryan Logan's profile photo
Erik Johnson's profile photo
Eric Rineer's profile photo
Gabe Lynn's profile photo
Jen Davison's profile photo
Stig Norland's profile photo
Cassandra Eleazer's profile photo
cuneyd Uneri's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Computer scientist
Skills
indexing - information retrieval - databases - collaborative filtering
Employment
  • LICEF Research Center, TELUQ, Université du Québec
    Professor, 2004 - present
    Promoted to full professor in 2009. Funded by NSERC Discovery grants (2003-2007, 2007- 2012, 2012-2017) in computer science. Program committee member at major conferences (ACM CIKM, ACM WSDM, ACM RecSys).
  • National Research Council of Canada
    Research Officer, 2002 - 2004
    Founded and lead the e-Health research group. Designed the Slope One algorithm.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Montreal, Canada
Story
Tagline
Computer Scientist
Introduction
I have always been intensely curious and I am always scouting for new knowledge. I love to program and publish open source software.

I have had many jobs: researcher in a government laboratory, University professor, entrepreneur and consultant. 

I spent too much time on my formal education. It got me a Ph.D. and even a post-doctoral fellowship. But I consider myself to be an autodidact.

I have two great kids and a beautiful wife. I live somewhere near Montreal in a small house I love.

My home online is at http://lemire.me
Bragging rights
I drink my weight in coffee every day.
Education
  • University of Toronto
    B.Sc. (Mathematics), 1989 - 1994
    Graduated with very high distinction.
  • University of Toronto
    M.Sc. (Mathematics), 1994 - 1995
  • École Polytechnique and University of Montreal
    Ph.D. (Engineering Mathematics), 1995 - 1998
    Graduated in 2.5 years.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
In a relationship
Daniel Lemire's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Ronin Institute
plus.google.com

The Ronin Institute: a home for the independent scholar

Open Data Structures
plus.google.com

data structures, textbook, open-source, open content, open access

Tinycon - Favicon Alerts
tommoor.github.com

Tinycon. A small library for manipulating the favicon. Tinycon allows the addition of alert bubbles and changing the favicon image. Tinycon

Why experts exaggerate — The Endeavour
feedproxy.google.com

Why experts exaggerate. by John on November 26, 2011. Seth Roberts writes this morning: How can you tell when an expert is exaggerating? His

Preparing for change, expressing intent — The Endeavour
feedproxy.google.com

Many good programming practices boil down to preparing for change or expressing intent. It seems to me that novices emphasize the former, ex

Automated Essay Scoring Systems as Effective as Human Graders ~ Stephen'...
www.downes.ca

Stephen's Web, the home page of Stephen Downes, with news and information on e-learning, new media, instructional technology, educational de

Triangle party — The Endeavour
feedproxy.google.com

Doodling in Math Class: Triangle Party. Tagged as: Math. { 2 comments… read them below or add one }. 1. Harlan 12.10.11 at 08:23. That's

You have more choices than you think — The Endeavour
feedproxy.google.com

You have more choices than you think. by John on December 10, 2011. This week Seth Godin wrote a blog post that include this gem: Remarkable

The new luxury
blog.vivekhaldar.com

Imagine, if, in today’s world, you saw someone jotting down notes in a meeting with a fine fountain pen. You know, the kind that has a cartr

Nothing found for 2012 03 16 8-lessons-about-money-i-learned-from-my-fa...
feedproxy.google.com

Sorry - this is an error page. We may have goofed, or you may have typed in a URL that doesn't exist. Try these pages instead: About Thi

…research shows that knowledge workers actually...
blog.vivekhaldar.com

“…research shows that knowledge workers actually have fewer good hours in a day than manual laborers do — on average, about six hours, as op

Knowing and Doing: February 2013 Archives
www.cs.uni.edu

It is a commonplace for anyone who has taught that we learn a lot more about any topic when we teach it -- even a topic in which we are ackn

Do we need copyright?
lemire.me

The concept of property is a social construction. Animals, such as cats, can own a piece of food, or a territory, but only as long as they a

Are Relational Databases good for anything anymore?
lemire.me

Are Relational Databases good for anything anymore? (Note: thanks to Daniel for letting me use his blog. All comments, questions and critici

ON: ‘Fat tax’ won’t solve obesity | Canadian Taxpayers Federation
taxpayer.com

A not-for-profit citizen's advocacy group dedicated to lower taxes, less waste and accountable government.

ongoing by Tim Bray · Seasonal Shinies
www.tbray.org

Seasonal Shinies. Search. Today we took down the Christmas tree. Christmas tree decorations. The pile of decorations is smaller than it was

Freakonomics: What Went Wrong? ~ Stephen's Web
www.downes.ca

Stephen's Web, the home page of Stephen Downes, with news and information on e-learning, new media, instructional technology, educational de

Seth's Blog » Blog Archive » Duct Tape, the Eurozone, Status-Quo Bias...
blog.sethroberts.net

I Recommend. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen. The Man Who Would Be Queen by Michael Bailey. Feynman's Rainbow by Leonard Mlodinow. M

Seth's Blog » Blog Archive » Assorted Links
blog.sethroberts.net

I Recommend. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen. The Man Who Would Be Queen by Michael Bailey. Feynman's Rainbow by Leonard Mlodinow. M

Seth's Blog » Blog Archive » Steve Jobs’ Graduation Speech: My Opinion
blog.sethroberts.net

I Recommend. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen. The Man Who Would Be Queen by Michael Bailey. Feynman's Rainbow by Leonard Mlodinow. M