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Daniel Fries Spanish Guitar, and Trio Paz
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15 followers
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Need a flamenco show? How about flamenco with Moroccan music?

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Nice view for music last night
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Daniel Fríes playing the Spanish Guitar tremolo classic, "Recuerdos de La Alhambra, at San Francisco City Hall, warming up for the wedding ceremony. Interrupted by the planner at the end!

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Where shall I put the sticker? My car?
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Trio Paz!

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What we do at a party (from an email to a new client):  I think you'll find that we are in perfect agreement about which moods we should set with which music over the course of the evening. We have had many years of experience playing for everything from cocktails to dinners to after dinner and ceremonies. Every moment in the evening has its particular feeling and set of constraints presented to us as musical mood-setters. For instance, during dinner we never want to get in the way of a diner's experience of the food or quieter conversation, so we play slower, quieter music which can sit in the background and enhance the experience of eating, rather than overwhelm the diner's sensory experience. Bossa Nova and Latin Jazz tend to be what we favor during this time, and we choose each song from our repertoire as we go, tailoring each choice to that particular moment of the evening. The main course, for instance, requires that we are even more toned-down in what we play than does the salad. 
We also pay very careful attention to the facial expressions of your guests, constantly monitoring for signs of either appreciation for the music, or of annoyance, and we adjust what we do accordingly. I should mention here that if you have any guests with hearing aids, you will want to seat them as far from the music as possible, as it will be difficult for them to enjoy themselves, or to participate in conversation with even a low volume of background music or noise. 
After dinner we watch the crowd and wait for a certain level of digestion to have been achieved, and for the energy of your guests' bodies to move away from their bellies. We then know that it is time for us to begin playing our more uptempo numbers, especially flamenco rumbas, setting a mood of easy confidence, and we enjoy watching as guests begin speaking more animatedly, and body language changes to excitement as conversation flows more and more easily. We keep a keen eye on movements which indicate to us that a guests or group of guests may be ready to dance, and if a little musical encouragement is needed, we make sure that we provide that extra energy to make it happen.  If guests do indeed choose to dance, we shift gears to enhance the experience of the dancers as much as possible. The tempo of our musical selection becomes critical, and will fall between 125 and 140 beats per minute. We know exactly which songs in our repertoire fall into this category, and have been saving them for this moment. We now think the way a good DJ would think, choosing each song to flow seamlessly into the last and the next, but varying the style and key just enough to keep things interesting, and keep people moving. We will even move directly from the end of one song into the next without stopping the beat, so that the dancers' experience does not diminish even for a second. 
When the dancers' energy begins to fade, we will play a slow dance to let them recover their energy or appreciate a romantic moment with a loved one, and then, if the mood is right, we will pick the music up again. 
Of course, if ever a musical selection isn't quite right for a party, the host/ess need only make eye contact and let us know with a brief hand or facial gesture how to adjust what we're doing. We will always defer to the tastes of our client, and your satisfaction is our top priority, so we make it quick, easy, and hassle-free for you to change the mood if one of our musical selections doesn't resonate with your vision for the moment.
Regarding cocktails, you mention you'd like more ambient/jazzy music. We are happy to accommodate this. Cocktails are a time for old friends to greet and get reacquainted, and for new relationships to be forged, so supporting the flow of conversation and creating a feeling of confidence and connection are what we prioritize with our musical selections. Changing the feeling of our music by juxtaposing diverse genres and tempos can enhance conversation by keeping it moving. A surprising new musical genre in the background triggers a new thought or memory in a guests' mind, and the conversation gains a new topic, becoming more interesting, and holding together where otherwise it would drift for lack of subject matter. A shift up to double-time has not only this same effect, but gives a feeling that the conversation has become more interesting and exciting - while on the other hand, moving the music out of double time back to a relaxed feel gives conversationalists the feeling of having been on a journey together which has just come to a relaxed and comfortable resting place. For this reason, we like to keep the music varied during cocktails, and of course we would employ jazzy and ambient feels, but with your permission, we will also mix in more uptempo and diverse music. 
I know this is a mouthful but I hope it has given you an insight into the real details of our work, and why our years of experience will make a difference to your party's success. 
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