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Daniel Dumitriu
Works at Rogers Data Centres
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Daniel Dumitriu

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Why does this ever need to be discussed at the level of a state?
State as in Germany, not California!
It is, mostly, a regional problem not a small scale one. The level of detail of 150,000 square kilometers is "fine" enough !

Dr. Pradeep Aggarwal, who leads the isotope hydrology division of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna:
"...The problem of groundwater depletion, he said, cannot be solved by individuals. This requires action on a larger scale,"

Meanwhile, Dr. Famiglietti, who is also senior water scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory says:
"...for the managers who have some control over the use of aquifers, the data from Grace is “too coarse” to provide useful data for local decisions. “They are waiting for us to do the research — we call it downscaling it to a resolution they can use, that makes it actionable for them,...”
Nearly a third of the world’s 37 largest aquifers are being drained faster than water can be returned to them, threatening regions that support two billion people, a recent study found.
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They will try this...
It might, even, be enforced for a few years.
But this is such a monumental example of active stupidity ! Fortunately, it won't last long - the implications are huge and, eventually,  nobody will be willing to live with them.
And, really, who cares that a few (more) generations will grow to be even more stupid than today's standards (yes, it is possible) ?
(#sarcasm)
 
More copyright maximalist insanity. Maybe it would be a good thing if the EU did implode as it seems to have been taken over by corporations and lobbyists entirely.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Wikipedia_Signpost/2015-06-17/In_focus
Considers that the commercial use of photographs, video footage or other images of works which are permanently located in physical public places should always be subject to prior authorisation from the authors or any proxy acting for them;. This amended text is now due to be voted on by the full ...
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Hmmm... Hmmmm, HMMM !
This seems to be going somewhere... And, along with other things, might, just, work !
(Still reminds me of Heinlein's "Time Enough for Love")
 
Biological limb regeneration in a rat, using decelularised bio-scaffold (http://www.massgeneral.org/about/pressrelease.aspx?id=1815), heralds a day when any biological part can be regenerated.

Next Big Future (4 June 2015): "A team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has made the first steps towards development of bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation They had used decellularization technique to regenerate kidneys, livers, hearts and lungs from animal models, but this is the first reported use to engineer the more complex tissues of a bioartificial limb." http://nextbigfuture.com/2015/06/conceptually-viable-brute-force-radical.html
A team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has made the first steps towards development of bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation They had used decellularization technique to regenerate...
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Hmmm...
The "company culture" might be so different as to make this a technology acquisition, more than anything else...
(Or, of course, I could be wrong - something I seem to be very good at...)
 
OpenStack consolidation continues and much like the days of UNIX nearly every hardware vendor has there own - HP, IBM and now Cisco, not mention all the Linux vendors, "pure play" vendors etc. 
And of course they are all 100% compatible, in the same way that UNIX was.

Interesting times
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Daniel Dumitriu

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I have to ask this again...
Although I am not very optimistic about getting much of a reaction...

How come there's so little interest in RHEL-based VDI installations/solutions ?

I mean, of course, Linux desktops backed by RHEV/RHOS
Maybe it's just me, but almost nobody seems to be interested in such a proposition.
Even the spice/qxl drivers seem to be much better on MS-Windows.

(Do we, still, MS-Windows in large installations, nowadays ?)
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The Vox article ends with:
"Pardoning Snowden would be a first step toward restoring a healthy balance between the military's need for secrecy and the public's right to know what the government is doing in its name."

And I keep wondering: can we still say "the public has rights" and keep a straight face ?
Rights exist only when they're guaranteed. Since they are not (anymore ?) guaranteed, these days, why keep expecting them to be respected ?
 
One year after Ed Snowden identified himself as the source of historic NSA leaks, it's time for President Obama to pardon him.
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Thank you, +Dan Woods
I know, I discovered this a bit late (better late, though ?), and it may have been posted, already.
And, of course, there may be one or two details I may not entirely agree with but, overall, this catches all the important points.
As to the question... I don't know... There was, a few years back, another successful company that managed to remain so up to the (happy) end: JBoss. Different business model, didn't make that much money and did not aim to, unconditionally, go public.
(and, as we all know, it is, now, part of Red Hat !  :-)  )


http://www.forbes.com/sites/danwoods/2015/04/28/will-there-ever-be-another-red-hat/
Will there be another company that becomes a successful business based on the same or similar model as Red Hat? For the fiscal year ending in February 2015, Red Hat has annual revenues of $1.79 billion and is a profitable company. Will any company ever get to $1 billion or even $500 million in revenue from open source subscriptions and have a chance of being profitable? To this the answer is no. There will never be another Red Hat.
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Daniel Dumitriu

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Yes !
Although, I hope everyone realizes the concepts and technology are so old - it's not, even, funny !
This year marks the tenth anniversary of the first formal implementation of the "container" concept in Unix.
Ten years ago I was asking myself "why not in Linux ?"
Did we just waste ten years reinventing the wheel ?!? Or, rather, we needed the 10 years to re-write a (by most accounts, nowadays) useful concept into a truly FOSS form...
(The beauty of patents and copyright laws at work ?!?)
 
My containers and microservices talk from DevOps Summit in NYC last week.
This blog comments on a variety of technology news, trends, and products and how they connect. I'm in Red Hat's cloud product strategy group in my day job although I cover a broader set of topics here. This is a personal blog; the opinions are mine alone.
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Maybe...
Wouldn't it be best if our education trained us that way ?!?
What if critical thinking was part of our way of thinking and (I know this will seem odd to a lot of people) feeling ?
And, related, it is hard - very hard - to be honest and, even more so, to be honest with yourself.
Those that do manage are, most of the time, qualified as cynical or "heartless".
That, however, would be the start on the way to avoid (or limit, or eliminate?) all these ambiguities...

(and, no, education does not equal College and University. Not, even, High School!)
 
Ever since seeing this article a few days ago, it's been bugging me. We know that self-driving cars will have to solve real-life "trolley problems:" those favorite hypotheticals of Philosophy 101 classes wherein you have to make a choice between saving, say, one person's life or five, or saving five people's lives by pushing another person off a bridge, or things like that. And ethicists (and even more so, the media) have spent a lot of time talking about how impossible it will be to ever trust computers with such decisions, and why, therefore, autonomous machines are frightening.

What bugs me about this is that we make these kinds of decisions all the time. There are plenty of concrete, real-world cases that actually happen: do you swerve into a tree rather than hit a pedestrian? (That's greatly increasing the risk to your life -- and your passengers' -- to save another person)

I think that part of the reason that we're so nervous about computerizing these ethical decisions is not so much that they're hard, as that doing this would require us to be very explicit about how we want these decisions made -- and people tend to talk around that very explicit decision, because when they do, it tends to reveal that their actual preferences aren't the same as the ones they want their neighbors to think they have.

For example: I suspect that most people, if driving alone in a vehicle, will go to fairly significant lengths to avoid hitting a pedestrian, including putting themselves at risk by hitting a tree or running into a ditch. I suspect that if the pedestrian is pushing a stroller with a baby, they'll feel even more strongly this way. But as soon as you have passengers in the car, things change: what if it's your spouse? Your children? What if you don't particularly like your spouse?

Or we can phrase it in the way that the headline below does: "Will your self-driving car be programmed to kill you if it means saving more strangers?" This phrasing is deliberately chosen to trigger a revulsion, and if I phrase it instead the way I did above -- in terms of running into a tree to avoid a pedestrian -- your answer might be different. The phrasing in the headline, on the other hand, seems to tap into a fear of loss of autonomy, which I often hear around other parts of discussions of the future of cars. Here's a place where a decision which you normally make -- based on secret factors which only you, in your heart, know, and which nobody else will ever know for sure -- is instead going to be made by someone else, and not necessarily to your advantage. We all suspect that it would sometimes make that decision in a way that, if we were making it secret (and with the plausible deniability that comes from it being hard to operate a car during an emergency), we might make quite differently.

Oddly, if you think about how we would feel about such decisions being made by a human taxi driver, people's reactions seem different, even though there's the same loss of autonomy, and now instead of a rule you can understand, you're subject to the driver's secret decisions. 

I suspect that the truth is this:

Most people would go to more lengths than they expect to save a life that they in some way cared about.

Most people would go to more lengths than they are willing to admit to save their own life: their actual balance, in the clinch, between protecting themselves and protecting others isn't the one they say it is. And most people secretly suspect that this is true, which is why the notion of the car "being programmed to kill you" in order to save other people's lives -- taking away that last chance to change your mind -- is frightening.

Most people's calculus about the lives in question is actually fairly complex, and may vary from day to day. But people's immediate conscious thoughts -- who they're happy with, who they're mad at -- may not accurately reflect what they would end up doing.

And so what's frightening about this isn't that the decision would be made by a third party, but that even if we ourselves individually made the decision, setting the knobs and dials of our car's Ethics-O-Meter every morning, we would be forcing ourselves to explicitly state what we really wanted to happen, and commit ourselves, staking our own lives and those of others on it. The opportunity to have a private calculus of life and death would go away.

As a side note, for cars this is less actually relevant, because there are actually very few cases in which you would have to choose between hitting a pedestrian and crashing into a tree which didn't come from driver inattention or other unsafe driving behaviors leading to loss of vehicle control -- precisely the sorts of things which self-driving cars don't have. So these mortal cases would be vanishingly rarer than they are in our daily lives, which is precisely where the advantage of self-driving cars comes from.

For robotic weapons such as armed drones, of course, these questions happen all the time. But in that case, we have a simple ethical answer as well: if you program a drone to kill everyone matching a certain pattern in a certain area, and it does so, then the moral fault lies with the person who launched it; the device may be more complex (and trigger our subconscious identification of it as being a "sort-of animate entity," as our minds tend to do), but ultimately it's no more a moral or ethical decision agent than a spear that we've thrown at someone, once it's left our hand and is on its mortal flight.

With the cars, the choice of the programming of ethics is the point at which these decisions are made. This programming may be erroneous, or it may fail in circumstances beyond those which were originally foreseen (and what planning for life and death doesn't?), but ultimately, ethical programming is just like any other kind of programming: you tell it you want X, and it will deliver X for you. If X was not what you really wanted, that's because you were dishonest with the computer.

The real challenge is this: if we agree on a standard ethical programming for cars, we have to agree and deal with the fact that we don't all want the same thing. If we each program our own car's ethical bounds, then we each have that individual responsibility. And in either case, these cars give us the practical requirement to be completely explicit and precise about what we do, and don't, want to happen when faced with a real-life trolley problem.
The computer brains inside autonomous vehicles will be fast enough to make life-or-death decisions. But should they? A bioethicist weighs in on a thorny problem of the dawning robot age.
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Somebody should suggest:
Please, kindly please, review until you fully understand Gunnery Sergeant Hartman's monologue in Full Metal Jacket.
In the end, most those pampered sensibilities do not matter - they help achieve exactly nothing !
I'm not a proponent of insensitivity (some do say I am the exact opposite and extremely non-controversial) but giving up critical thinking and any debate is going to produce only sub-individuals.
Sorry, , I do hate having to say this, the same happens way too often north of the border. Plenty !
More often than not, in the last ten years, the Academia is bending over backward to the whims of their "customers" and too many of these "customers" enter the Universities with the goal of "affirming their individuality" (?!?). Learning (whatever's left) is soo back-stage !
 
Thought-provoking analysis. "I once saw an adjunct not get his contract renewed after students complained that he exposed them to "offensive" texts written by Edward Said and Mark Twain. His response, that the texts were meant to be a little upsetting, only fueled the students' ire and sealed his fate.  That was enough to get me to comb through my syllabi and cut out anything I could see upsetting a coddled undergrad, texts ranging from Upton Sinclair to Maureen Tkacik — and I wasn't the only one who made adjustments, either." https://www.vox.com/2015/6/3/8706323/college-professor-afraid
How a simplistic, unworkable, and ultimately stifling conception of social justice took over the American college campus.
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Really ????
 
White House: Yeah, copyright those APIs.
Google v. Oracle: Unlicensed use of APIs might be a fair use, US says.
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Is it just me ? Possibly - I tend to be rather "slow", that way !

Great, but could we get more examples around yum/rpm, please?

(In other words, "Ubuntu != Linux". Sorry to disappoint you...)
An article describing how to install and use 'ctop' which is a command line based Linux container monitoring tool.
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Specialization is for insects. Robert A. Heinlein, "Time Enough for Love": - - - - A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
Introduction
Fiddling with computers - anything from (computer) system engineering, software engineering, cloud... stuff, to less mundane "artificial consciousness/life/intelligence" (not necessarily in the common sense of AI, more towards "converged intelligence")
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Very opinionated (is that, even, something to brag about ?)
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Cloud Systems Architect
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  • Rogers Data Centres
    Cloud Systems Architect, 2013 - present
  • CGI Group
    Linux Architect, 2007 - 2013
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Daniel Dumitriu's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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