Profile

Cover photo
Daniel Bastian
Attended James Madison University
Lives in Arlington, VA
577 followers|217,393 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Pinned

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
When science and art collaborate, we all benefit. Fire up your imagination with these creative presentations of science.
1
Add a comment...

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
According to Carl Zimmer, the recent Cas9/CRISPR-editing of human embryos in China could mean for germline engineering what Dolly meant for animal cloning in 1996. Zimmer recently appeared on NPR's On Point to discuss the ongoing controversy of editing human embryos.
This morning I went on the NPR show "On Point" to talk about using CRISPR to edit embryos. I've embedded it below, and you can also listen to it at this link. It was fascinating to listen to my fel...
1
Add a comment...

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"Currently orbiting at a distance of 13,600 kilometers off of the asteroid’s surface, or some forty times more distant than the International Space Station is from Earth’s surface, Dawn will descend over the coming months, mapping out Ceres with a variety of instruments, and learning the elemental composition of this material.

Right now, we can already be sure of some things that it isn’t, but the coming months will shed so much light — at such improved resolution — on what’s really causing this most mysterious of features. There’s something reflecting the light here, something that’s unlike anything else on Ceres’ surface, and we’re about to find out what."

What's causing the white spots at the bottom of one of Ceres' largest craters? There are three viable possibilities, but none of them involve aliens.
A series of mysterious white features lurk at the bottom of one of its most massive craters. Here’s what they could be, …
3 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
Super poor headline but an exciting study. The latest evidence suggests that eukaryotes (you, me, plants, fungi and all other organisms with nucleated cells) are more closely related to archaea than to bacteria. A study published this month by a team in Sweden describes the discovery of an archaeal species that is closer than any one before it to what we think a transitional form might look like.

"These findings clinch the case for the origin of eukaryotes from within the archaeal diversity and point to a specific part of the archaeal evolutionary tree where eukaryotes belong...Equally important, Lokiarchaeota combine a number of “eukaryotic-like” features that previously have been found scattered among different archaeal genomes. Taken together, these findings give credence to the evolutionary scenario in which the eukaryotes evolved from an archaeon with a complex cellular organization that might have been capable of engulfing bacteria."
"At first he thought it had to be a mistake, an artifact of some kind of genomic contamination."
1
Daniel Bastian's profile photo

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
"This is the last planet we’ll see up close for the first time—at least until we can send starships to other suns. We can expect, when New Horizons’ flies past Pluto, some confirmations of our many theoretical models. Far more important, we can expect surprises. First will come fresh pictures. Then will come streams of data about the fields and particles surrounding the planet. From that we can fashion a deeper understanding of this small, dim, world."
For 85 years, Pluto has belonged to the science fiction writers. Now it’s about to get real.
1
Add a comment...

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"We see a popular picture of the CMB as a Globe. It is all around us. I understand the CMB to be the earliest picture of the universe that we have. Because we look back in time when seeing distant objects, the CMB is then logically the most distant “thing” that we can see. This would suggest that the CMB is the end of the universe, but we know that isn’t true. Space goes on infinitely, as far as we know, and we know we haven’t seen its edge. So, where is the CMB that we imaged if not at the edge of the universe?"

When it comes to the farthest thing we can see in the Universe, that’s the Cosmic Microwave Background, or the leftover glow from the Big Bang, emitted when the Universe was a mere 380,000 years old. But what, exactly, does this mean? Does it mean that we’re seeing the “edge” of the Universe? Does it mean that there’s nothing to see, farther back beyond it? Does it mean that, as time goes on, we’re going to be able to see farther back in time and space? The answers are no, no, and yes, respectively. If we want to see farther than ever before, we've got two options: either wait for more time to pass, or get moving and build that cosmic neutrino background detector.
It’s the oldest, most distant light we’ve ever seen. But where, exactly, is it?
22 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
577 people
Matthew Hoyt's profile photo
masawud A Yunus's profile photo
Nancy Fernandez's profile photo
John Deese's profile photo
Romana Cristaldi's profile photo
Matthew Moynihan (The Polywell Guy)'s profile photo
Dos Corazones ADC's profile photo
Michelle LeClair's profile photo
Samuel Chilaka's profile photo

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
"In any case, the therapies seem to do best with cancers where an immunological reaction, however feeble, has somehow gotten underway. The difficulty lies in increasing its intensity without inflicting too much collateral damage.

"For the deadliest malignancies, the trade-offs are probably worth it. The challenge now is to confront a wider range of cancers — and to identify in advance the patients most likely to benefit."
1
Add a comment...

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
Beauty is in the eye of the beeholder.  #puns
In an attempt to better understand exactly what happens as a bee grows from an egg into an adult insect, photographer Anand Varma teamed up with the bee lab at UC Davis to film the first three weeks of a bee's life in unprecedented detail, all condensed into a 60-second clip. The video above
1
Add a comment...

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
China has planted more than 100,000 square miles of trees since 1978 across northern China. Consider that tropical deforestation alone releases more than 1 billion tonnes of CO2 each year. China's afforestation project acts as a carbon sink and is believed to offset about half of this amount. Long-term impacts are still unclear.

"The study shows that China's afforestation efforts, together with regrown forests in Russia and neighboring countries, offset roughly half of the carbon loss by tropical deforestation. While the world is getting greener as a whole, massive vegetation loss is still occurring in many regions, with the greatest decline to be seen on the edge of the Amazon forests and in the Indonesian provinces of Sumatra and Kalimantan."
1
Add a comment...

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
Denise Grady, staff reporter for the New York Times, writes about Ebola lurking in a victim's eyes, changing their color.
Dr. Ian Crozier, who survived an Ebola infection last fall, calls himself a poster child for “post-Ebola syndrome,” which is also being reported in West Africa.
1
Add a comment...

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
In addition to higher daily minimums around the globe, the distribution of hot vs. cold days has been shifting towards more and more hot records. As Kevin Cowtan explains, global warming does not mean cold weather goes away, only that the relationship between hot and cold will change (climate is the average weather). Better than simply looking at the absolute number of hot and cold daily records since temperature tracking began is to look at the proportion of hot to cold records over time. When we do this, we can clearly see a shift toward more record daily maximums since 1950. This represents one of the key pieces of evidence that our planet is indeed warming. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IxYhEKbsZo&feature=youtu.be
1
Add a comment...

Daniel Bastian

Shared publicly  - 
 
I’ve added language about the recent tropospheric temperature study to my “Hot Spot” doc, for those interested.

"Notably, Sherwood et al’s May 2015 study has resolved the bias in the radiosonde trend data and confirmed the hot spot using a mix of Kriging and linear regression techniques. This builds on their previous work looking at thermal wind data and is consistent with earlier results by other researchers reconciling both radiosonde and satellite data to the model predictions."
Climate physics predicts a hot spot in the tropics. Is this prediction vindicated by the temperature record?
1
Daniel Bastian's profile photo
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
577 people
Matthew Hoyt's profile photo
masawud A Yunus's profile photo
Nancy Fernandez's profile photo
John Deese's profile photo
Romana Cristaldi's profile photo
Matthew Moynihan (The Polywell Guy)'s profile photo
Dos Corazones ADC's profile photo
Michelle LeClair's profile photo
Samuel Chilaka's profile photo
Work
Employment
  • Writer, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Arlington, VA
Previously
Washington, DC - Arlington, VA - Richmond, VA
Contact Information
Home
Email
Story
Tagline
Science Writer | Home Theater Installer | Aspiring Author | Eternal Student
Introduction
Informed Citizen. Savvy Conversationalist. Knowledge Hound. Autodidact. Information Distiller. Fluent in science, technology and religion. Vanguard of truth. I like to debunk 'bunk'. Videophile. Audiophile. Purist.

I am an active Google+ user who contributes a good amount of original content. You'll also find I am not a fan simply resharing articles and will typically preface with additional insight to add value for my followers.

You can stay connected with me here and through my website, where science, technology, the web and a relentless artillery of thoughts collide in a fury of cerebral pyrotechnics: Waiving Entropy


Some suggested circles to put me in:
  • New developments in science
  • Climate science
  • Evolutionary biology
  • Smartphones, tablets and computers
  • Display technology and HD media
  • Blu-ray recommendations
  • Book reviews and recommendations
  • Xbox 360, Xbox One chat

Helpful Google+ Resources:

Education
  • James Madison University
    2004 - 2009
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
July 5
Relationship
In a relationship