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Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center
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We are thrilled and honored to announce that Boston Children's Hospital has been ranked the #1 Children's Hospital by U.S. News and World Report for 2016-17! It has been a year full of inspiration and innovation. THANK YOU to all of our patient families and staff members for making this possible. Learn more about the rankings here: http://on.bchil.org/28KRNcu
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Boston Children's Hospital travels through time all the way back to 1918 with their display of weird things kids have swallowed. The mini museum includes a chicken claw, an FDR pin, a crucifix and a toy car and reminds parents to remain vigilant and to think about everything that their children are exposed to: http://on.bchil.org/22YsVDW
BOSTON (AP) — A chicken claw. An FDR pin. A crucifix. A toy sheriff's star. Those are some of the weird items that have been removed from kids' throats, nostrils and ears by doctors at Boston Children's Hospital and are…
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) turn up thousands to tens of thousands of hits, most of them in the 99% "noncoding" part of the genome. Which hits have meaning? A new assay called MPRA could start to provide some answers, shedding light on childhood blood disorders and more. http://on.bchil.org/22PLnOP

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The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery challenges high-income countries to do their part in ending the surgery gap by 2030: http://on.bchil.org/1WsZyI1
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Shortly after he turned 9 years old, Ethan began to lose his sight, hearing and ability to speak. Following countless doctor visits, therapists, lab tests and a CT scan, he was diagnosed with a rare brain disease called "adrenoleukodystrophy." There was no available treatment. Now, nearly 40 years later, read how early results of an experimental gene therapy may offer hope to the roughly one in every 20,000 boys born with this disease: http://on.bchil.org/1T1Ah2H
Shortly after he turned 9 years old, Ethan began to lose his sight, hearing and ability to speak. Following countless doctor visits, therapists, lab tests and a then-revolutionary CT scan, he was diagnosed with a rare brain disease called “adrenoleukodystrophy.” There was no available treatment. Now, nearly 40 years later, read how early results of an experimental gene therapy may offer hope to the roughly one in every 20,000 boys born with this ...
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Telomeres (chromosome tips) can be sabotaged by mutations in many different genes — in the rare disease dyskeratosis congenita, it's 11 genes and counting. This fascinating deep dive also shows how blurry disease definitions can be. http://on.bchil.org/1RM9YNR


The chromosome tips known as telomeres can be compromised by many different mutations. Dyskeratosis congenita is just one of the diseases that result.
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Have them in circles
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Critical care medicine is often considered excessive in areas of the world that lack basic resources. However, when basic needs go unaddressed, curable illnesses can progress to become life threatening. In these cases, critical care can save lives. Dr. Unami Mulale's personal experience in Rwanda and Liberia inspired her call to arms: http://on.bchil.org/1turnpa

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Many teens are at moderate risk for high cholesterol levels later in life, but do they care enough to take action now? A new study reveals the varying levels of concern that teens and parents have: http://on.bchil.org/22Ww9Yk

Many teens are at moderate risk for dangerously high cholesterol levels later in life, but do they care enough to take action now?
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Antonio has hydrocephalus and has had multiple shunt failures in his 14 years. An innovative device he helped test, called ShuntCheck, can detect a blocked shunt with less need for CT/MRI and unnecessary surgery. http://on.bchil.org/22Ka6UH
A device called ShuntCheck can detect when a shunt has stopped working, avoiding the need for CT and MRI scans and exploratory surgery in hydrocephalus.
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Many parents believe that there's a link between autism spectrum disorder and GI problems. Boston Children's gastroenterologist Sonia Ballal, MD, reviews the evidence and highlights a new study, now enrolling, that is investigating differences in the microbiome. http://on.bchil.org/1NTIyEd

Are children with autism spectrum disorder more prone to gastrointestinal problems like IBD? A new study is investigating differences in GI microbiota.
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What's new in science and innovation this week? Cancer, Zika, digital health, consumer blood tests and spinal cord injury were among the topics that made the news: http://on.bchil.org/1SjIJcF
Cancer, Zika, digital health, consumer blood tests and spinal cord injury were among the topics that made for good reading this week.
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Boston Children's Hospital Dr. Beth Stevens may have unlocked the door to going after Alzheimer's, Huntington's, autism, schizophrenia, and other intractable brain disorders. Learn more from her interview with MIT Tech Review: http://on.bchil.org/1N50RWp
Beth Stevens thinks she has solved a mystery behind brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s and schizophrenia.
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Have them in circles
27 people
Raquel Morgado's profile photo
AC Water Heater Services's profile photo
Doctor  Patil's profile photo
Rob Graham's profile photo
Wig USA Inc's profile photo
amer alfayad's profile photo
Tom Ulrich's profile photo
Caren Cummings's profile photo
Workers Comp Collectors's profile photo
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1-855-320-2090
Address
44 Binney Street Boston, MA 02115
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Working together for children with cancer – from diagnosis to survivorship
Introduction
The Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center provides the combined strengths of two internationally renowned Harvard teaching hospitals. Since the 1940s, when Sidney Farber achieved the first remissions of acute lymphocytic leukemia in children, pioneering physician researchers at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s have been at the forefront of life-saving breakthroughs in the fight against pediatric cancer and blood disorders. A single team of experts delivers care at a Boston campus connected by pedestrian bridges, with inpatients treated at Boston Children's Hospital and outpatients at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.