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Dan Peterson
Works at Sports Are 80 Percent Mental
Attended University of Wisconsin - Madison
Lives in Wisconsin
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Dan Peterson

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Many young athletes are adding visual skills training to their overall athletic training regimen. The goal is to “see the ball earlier” in the pitch zone allowing for more time to perceive rotation and trajectory. More time translates into increased confidence and increased exit batted ball velocity.
This is the year. This is the season when you finally learn to hit that curveball. But better yet, you will be able to SEE the curveball right out of the pitcher’s hand and not be fooled. It’s not about the bat or your gloves or even your stance in the batter’s box. It’s about what’s under your helmet. From the split second your eyes pick up the ball’s spin and trajectory, your brain is performing multiple calculations and recognizing ...
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Back in 2013, before his recent retirement, before his second Super Bowl win, Peyton Manning wasn’t sure if he would ever play football again.  After surgeons removed the bulging cervical intervertebral disc in his neck, the pain was gone but then the rehab learning process was just beginning.  

Damage to the surrounding nerves along with new metal hardware now holding together the vertebrae above and below the injured area caused a communications disruption between Manning’s brain and that well-trained right arm.  The result was a future Hall of Fame quarterback having to relearn how to throw a football.
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"We show, for the first time, that aerobic fitness may play a role in this cortical thinning," said Dr. Chaddock-Heyman. "In particular, we find that higher-fit 9- and 10-year-olds show a decrease in gray-matter thickness in some areas known to change with development, specifically in the frontal, temporal and occipital lobes of the brain."
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“We know from previous research that kids struggle to form complex associations in the moment, so we thought that with some time off and periods of sleep they might be able to do better,” said Dr. Darby. “And it turned out that when they had time to absorb the information, they did better.”
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"The drive to win underpins both gambling behaviour and competitive sport," said Dr. Belle Gavriel-Fried of Tel Aviv’s School of Social Work. "Most of the research within this area has been conducted on university athletes, but we wanted to dig deeper, find out whether the link between gambling and physical activities began earlier -- before other co-factors emerge -- and we found out that, in fact, it does."
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"You might think that's a really positive thing for the child [to encourage them to win], but that's creating a lot of worry [for the kid] as well,” said Dr. Kaye. “I don't think parents are necessarily thinking about that kind of thing." #YouthSports
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Dan,

This highlights a couple important points when it comes to young athletes performance. When an athlete has to focus on "beating" the opponent, they have to focus on their own performance and the performance of the opposition. However, as stated in the article, when focusing on only their past performances and striving to improve on them, the athlete understands that everything is in their own control, and they do not have to worry about the performance of someone else. For encouragement in young athletes I believe this it especially important to focus on improving themselves as opposed to simply winning because that competitive spirit does not fully come to fruition until later in their athletic careers anyways. With focusing on self-improvement they will be better positioned to win in the future as well. This in essence is a win-win scenario and will increase the confidence of a young athlete under positive circumstances.

Thank you for the read,

Philip
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Dan Peterson

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With less than a half second to to make the swing/no-swing decision, if the muscle activity isn’t triggered early in the pitch, the bat just won’t get around in time.

This time lag between incoming visual stimuli, motion planning in the brain and activation of the muscles, known as sensorimotor delay, is common throughout sports.  Think about a goalkeeper moving to stop a hockey puck or soccer ball; a tennis player returning a blistering serve; or a receiver adjusting to the flight of a football.  Their eyes tell them the speed and path of the object they need to intercept, then their brain instructs the body to move in the predicted path to arrive just in time.
Most baseball coaches and a few parents have learned the futility of instructing a young batter to “keep their eye on the ball.” Studies have shown that it is very difficult, if not impossible, for human eyes to track the trajectory of the pitch all the way across the plate. Training a young hitter’s eyes and brain to identify the type of pitch early after its release will help them make intelligent guesses as to its future flight.
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"First, the 3D games have a few things the 2D ones do not," said Dr. Dane Clemenson. "They've got a lot more spatial information in there to explore. Second, they're much more complex, with a lot more information to learn. Either way, we know this kind of learning and memory not only stimulates but requires the hippocampus."
Just about every parent has said it, “Stop wasting your day playing those video games! Get outside, run around, enjoy the fresh air.” It seems like obvious, logical advice for kids growing their brains and their bodies. While there is nothing wrong with playing outside, the claim that video games have no redeeming value is starting to be refuted by science. The latest example is a study by researchers at the University of California-I...
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"The wrong or right use of words can send an athlete into a chain-reaction spiral of events--actions and reactions that can be positive or negative.  It just depends on the athlete."
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Great post for any athlete.
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Kicking a football through the uprights of a goal post is slightly different than kicking a soccer ball into a goal but we didn’t have to completely relearn the kicking task when switching between the two sports. Researchers at McGill University took another step forward in understanding how the trial and error of practice teaches our brain to perform these complex sports skills.
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Adam Gazzaley is building a repertoire of games that could one day help us reduce or even reverse the impact on our cognitive faculties of disorders such as Alzheimer's, or deficits caused by brain trauma. At his neuroscience lab within the University of California San Francisco and his gaming company Akili, Gazzaley is attempting to discover whether "we can use this approach to really make a difference".
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“We showed it to Erik, and Erik loves it — he’s been tracking a lot of the same data for years on paper and pencil and Excel spreadsheets,” Peterson said.   #GoBadgers   #FinalFour  +Wisconsin Badgers 
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Work
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Sports Cognition Coach - Designing cognitive assessment and training programs for developing athletes
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Athlete Performance, Skill Development, Cognitive Training, Mental Skills, Coaching, Sports Science, Fitness, Kinesiology, Biomechanics, Youth Sports
Employment
  • Sports Are 80 Percent Mental
    Owner and Sports Cognition Coach, 2009 - present
  • Metrifit
    Director of U.S. Business Development, 2013 - present
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Currently
Wisconsin
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Sports Cognition Coach
Introduction
As a Sports Cognition Coach, I work with teams and clubs at the youth, high school and college level to design cognitive assessment and training programs that supplement traditional sport coaching.  Learn more at 80% Mental
Education
  • University of Wisconsin - Madison
    BBA - Finance, International Business, 1981 - 1986
  • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
    MS - Management Info Systems, 1995 - 1999
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Male
Dan Peterson's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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