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Does anyone here know anything about the "International Business Times"? It shows up everywhere in Google News searches, but I'd never heard of it before seeing it there.
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John Freed's profile photoBiswapesh Chattopadhyay's profile photoTom Vest's profile photoDan Gillmor's profile photo
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I've been wondering the same thing. Also: the Christian Post.
 
The Wikipedia article is, as they note, little more than an advertisement. Doesn't tell me much...
 
From what I can tell it is a content farm, and a very poorly written one at that. Ran into a few articles that were basically just the headline repeated in fifteen different ways throughout the page.
 
I never heard of them before either, but their "research" operation claims to be in partnership with Philip Balboni's GlobalPost.
 
Yesterday they were showing up at the top for MacBook Air news also. Feels like they're doing some seo tricks.
 
Lexis-Nexis provides access to 31 different Newstex feeds, including articles under the "International Business Times" monniker going back to March 30 2009. (Perhaps) coincidentally, a March 27 entry in Newstex' "The Publisher-Insider" blog profiles a newly-added Newstex content partner, "GlobalPost."

http://newstex.com/2009/03/27/the-publisher-insider-globalpost/
http://www.globalpost.com/members
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/23/business/media/23global.html?_r=2&ref=business

GlobalPost seems to be the brainchild of Charles Sennott ( prev. Boston Globe < New York Daily Post ) and Philip Balboni (prev. Comcast News / New England Cable News < Boston-area ABC affiliate news exec).
 
Well, I'm no closer to understanding what IBT is all about, but the SEO-ing piece does seem clear....
 
Popped up out of nowhere within last few weeks, though their website says they've been around since 2005. Seems to be an aggregator/content rewriter. E. info@ibtimes.co.uk
 
perhaps they improved their SEO algorithms recently.
 
This is quite an interesting challenge! I started Googling their chief staff members (Dev Pragad and Etienne Uzac). Dev is a Ph.D. from London School of Economics who is an expert on IPv6 and QoS. Not much there. It does seem, however, that he at least briefly taught computer science at Olivet University, which provides "Bible-based, seminary quality learning."

Etienne is a Christian activist who has covered his Google tracks rather well. I suspect he has SEO help on that front. You get tantalizing clues from the Google cache, but often when you click on the cache link, it goes nowhere. Interesting. He is listed as the organizer of a Linked In event organizing a weekly Christian lunchtime group in Lower Manhattan starting in 2009.

Google Cache links him to an article about Christians in Kenya, (possibly the author), but the current online article itself has no reference. Again, it appears to be covering tracks.

He is listed (cachewise, not currently) as an officer of Veremedia, a major Christian ad placement firm run by Michael Moon, former advertising director of the Christian Post, mentioned above. Moon's Linked In profile has been modified to remove the Christian Post reference, however. (Google cache has it.)

Moon's current profile reads:
President, CEO
Veremedia Inc.
Marketing and Advertising industry
March 2004 – Present (7 years 5 months)

but the cached version reads:

President, CEO
Veremedia Inc.
Marketing and Advertising industry
March 2006 – Present (5 years 4 months)

Director of Advertising
The Christian Post
Privately Held; 51-200 employees; Newspapers industry
February 2003 – February 2006 (3 years 1 month)

I leave further research to others, but I think it's pretty clear that they're Christian activists who know how to game Google.
 
One more piece to the puzzle ... Uzac was cache-listed as Principal at Veremedia, which started in 2005 (same time frame claimed by IBTimes). PR pieces for Veremedia were written by Sophia Yu, who has this on her Spoke.com profile:

Sophia Yu
Director, Operations and Human Resources at Christian Post
529 14th Street Nw 420
Washington, Dc 21459
 
Good detective work. I'm surprised they've tricked the Google News anti-contentfarm algo so convincingly. When I was a local Los Angeles editor for Patch.com, New York headquarters said they had to work with Google News for six months to get indexed.
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