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Dan Alec Yamaguchi
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Dan Alec Yamaguchi

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Cataracts treatment has been, until now, nothing less than surgery. Not anymore! Scientists have developed an eye drop that has the ability to shrink down and dissolve them.
Researchers in the US have developed a new drug that can be delivered directly into the eye via an eye dropper to shrink down and dissolve cataracts - the leading cause of blindness in humans. While the effects have yet to be tested on humans, the...
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Dan Alec Yamaguchi

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Your Brain on the Web

"In the Culture novels by Iain M. Banks, futuristic post-humans install devices on their brains called a “neural lace.” A mesh that grows with your brain, it’s essentially a wireless brain-computer interface. But it’s also a way to program your neurons to release certain chemicals with a thought. And now, there’s a neural lace prototype in real life."

I mean, forget Google Glass - this would be Google brain! A total capability of interfacing with the web and the IoT at neural synapses level! 

h/t +Zeke Cao for surfacing this. Now I owe him way more than one beer. 
In the Culture novels by Iain M. Banks, futuristic post-humans install devices on their brains called a “neural lace.” A mesh that grows with your brain, it’s essentially a wireless brain-computer interface. But it’s also a way to program your neurons to release certain chemicals with a thought. And now, there’s a neural lace prototype in real life.
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High Resolution 3D imaging at Nanoscale

To enhance our imaging abilities we have to understand how light interacts with objects at nanoscale. Scientists at Stanford have developed imaging technique combing Cathodoluminescence and Tomography to generate high resolution 3D images of gold plated Crescent with diameter of 250nm, several hundred times smaller than human hair. Such technology can significantly enhance our ability to optimize LEDs, Solar panels and biological imaging capabilities.

Original Study: Nature Nanotechnology http://goo.gl/N9wpWx Source: Stanford University http://goo.gl/4NP610

‪#‎nanotechnology‬ ‪#‎futuretechnology‬ ‪#‎tomography‬ ‪#‎cathodoluminescence‬ ‪#‎highresolutionimaging‬ ‪#‎3dimaging‬
To fully utilize the benefits of nanotechnology is it critical to study nanomaterials at smallest level possible. Engineers at Stanford University have combined two imaging techniques, cathodoluminescence and tomography to generate high resolution 3D images
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Read other messages and engrave your own words to bitcoin blockchain forever.
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A simple system consisting of a pair of atoms in a two-site “minicrystal” is able to reproduce the physics of a widely used model of electrons in a solid.
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Interesting...
The next step in the evolution of JavaScript and asm.js is to do away with both of them.
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Motility of two-component droplets

Scientists at Stanford University have explained the physical principles of spontaneous liquid movements. The droplets consisting of propylene glycol, water and food coloring move with the apparent regularity. "The aesthetics of the system was definitely one thing that kept us going," said Prakash, the paper's senior author. "It's just so beautiful – how could we not understand it?"
Water evaporates faster from the surface of the droplets than propylene glycol. Higher water tension on the side of droplets promotes its flow. Furthermore, mixing of droplets occurs if the liquids have the same surface tension (the same color) depending on the propylene glycol concentration. Such properties of two-compound fluids can be used to construct self-controlling fluidic machines.

More information:
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v519/n7544/full/nature14272.html
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It’s more than just a tea bag, it’s a specially crafted infusing sachet filled with magical beer-bettering goodness, and it’ll make sure that you never have to drink a boring old beer ever [...]
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Simulating network slowness, request delay, etc.

Writing Web components, sometime I have to show a spinner (or other hints) to indicate loading of data (via Ajax). This is usually done by adding a class when loading and removing it when data come.
But to test this can be hard if the server is quite fast and the payload is small.
In the past, I just added a sleep() call in the server, to have time to see the changes in action. But it might not be always possible or convenient.
I just found out a useful little application (for Windows) able to delay (or throttle, etc.) a request, up to 3 seconds: Clumsy is an open-source software, small, without install, and doing well its job.

http://jagt.github.io/clumsy/index.html
clumsy makes your network condition on Windows significantly worse, but in a managed and interactive manner. Introduction. Leveraging the awesome WinDivert library, clumsy stops living network packets and capture them, lag/drop/tamper/.. the packets on demand, then send them away.
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Very interesting device that I came across online yesterday. This is Cubli, a mechanical cube that is capable of balancing itself very effectively, and can even "jump up and walk" across surfaces by performing controlled falls.

The Cubli attains it's balance from multiple inertia sensors within the device, the measurements of which are fused to get a sense of angular velocity and tilt of itself on a surface. The hull sensors on it measure the angular velocity of the three reaction wheels within the Cubli. These measurements are used by a nonlinear controller to balance it on a corner, while the angular velocity of the reaction wheels are near zero. This allows the Cubli to balance on the corner even when it is disturbed.

In order to jump up, the reaction wheels spin rapidly to build up angular momentum, then the wheels suddenly brake--causing the momentum to be transferred to the Cubli's body which causes it to pop up without needing assistance from outside the device. These jumps and balances can be put in sequences to make it seem as if the Cubli can actually walk.

Specific information about the device (including multiple videos with explanations and demonstrations):
http://robohub.org/swiss-robots-cubli-a-cube-that-can-jump-up-balance-and-walk-across-your-desk/



General information about angular momentum: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angular_momentum
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Michele Hax's profile photo
 
I love this stuff. We had Lincoln Logs and Erector Sets. Didn't even have Legos. :( (poor older person, haha.)
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