Profile

Cover photo
Dale Modisette
Worked at Host of The Helping Wiccan
Lives in Livingston, Texas
2,533 followers|4,377,329 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos+1'sReviews
People
Have him in circles
2,533 people
Valeriu Barbu's profile photo
Tim “Professor” Davis's profile photo
SÀN GỖ NGUYỄN KIM's profile photo
Bilal khan bhadur's profile photo
Keven Fivenson's profile photo
Sporting Cutlery's profile photo
Technology and Gadget's profile photo
Arm Ruz's profile photo
Additional Food Item-Shopping for home's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Livingston, Texas
Previously
Channelview, Texas - Houston, Texas - Livingston, Texas - Beaumont, Texas - Nacogdoches, Texas - Baytown, Texas - La Porte, Texas
Contact Information
Work
Phone
281-301-5326
Story
Tagline
To be or not to be is not the "?" but the answer!
Introduction
Amazon Wish List : 

My Google+ Communities
Some of 98 I'm apart of 
Green Party (owner)

YouTube channels I'm subscribe to:
Some of 354 channels



I'm 6'7" 183 lbs (was 265 lbs 4 years ago) hazel eye's w/ a blue ring around them when happy.

I've been a Wiccan for over 18 years. 

Well I've lived 43 years and have own few different company's  over the years: 
Computer repair
Wholesale coffee 
Mobile detailing business (cars, yachts as well as personal aircraft's)
Lawn care service  
Web Design

 From the time I was 10 years old  till age 13 I lived at Boys and Girl Harbor in La porte, Texas. Of all my family throughout history I was the first person to ever graduate high school. I went 3 different colleges/universities starting with  San jacinto college North,  Kingwood College; now known as Lone Star College (after 2007) and last was Stephen F. Austin State University. I've been on disability for the past 5 years.

These series are some of my favorite heroine/with a few other series.

01. Jane Yellowrock series by Faith Hunter
02. Mercy Thompson series by Patricia Briggs
03. Elemental Assassin series by Jennifer Estep
04. Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter series by Laurell K. Hamilton
05. Kitty Norville series by Carrie Vaughn
06. Kate Daniels series by Ilona Andrews
07. Cassandra Palmer series by Karen Chance 
08. Chronicles of Elantra series by Michelle Sagara
09. Merry Gentry series by Laurell K. Hamilton
10. Vampire Academy series by Richelle Mead
11. Bloodlines series by Richelle Mead
12. Sabina Kane series by Jaye Wells
13. Shifters series by Rachel Vincent
14. Nikki Glass series by Jenna Black
15. Heist Society series by Ally Carter
16. A Witchcraft Mystery series by Juliet Blackwell
17. Coffeehouse Mystery series by Cleo Coyle
18. Psychic Eye Mystery series by Victoria Laurie
19. Raised by Wolves series by Jennifer Lynn Barnes
20. Indigo Court series by Yasmine Galenorn
21. Otherworld/Sisters of the Moon series by Yasmine Galenorn
22. Glass series by Maria V. Snyder
23. Dorina Basarab series by Karen Chance
24. The Iron Druid Chronicles series by Kevin Hearne
25. In Death series by J.D. Robb
26. Riley Jenson Guardian series by Keri Arthur 
27. October Daye: Chronological series by Seanan McGuire
28. Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon
29. Alpha & Omega series by Patricia Briggs 
30. Imp series by Debra Dunbar
31. Gallagher Girls series by Ally Carter
32. Black Wings series by Christina Henry
33. The Demonata series by Darren Shan
34. The Black Jewels series by Anne Bishop 
35. Argeneau series by Lynsay Sands 
36. John Rain series by Barry Eisler 
37. Artemis Fowl series by Eoin Colfer 
38. Pretty Little Liars series by Sara Shepard
39. Chronicles of Nick series by Sherrilyn Kenyon
40. Dark-Hunter series by Sherrilyn Kenyon
41. Dublin Murder Squad series by Tana French
42. Jessica McClain series by Amanda Carlson


(B) Movies
The Game, Matrix, A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, The Craft, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Harry Potter (all of them), Life is Beautiful, Grease 2, The Notebook, Dr. Horrible Act-1-2-3, Kung Fu Panda, Sneakers, The Game, The.Transformers-The.Movie (1986)

(C) Music
Enya, Mozart, NIN (Pretty Hate Machine), Peal Jam (Black CD) Blue Grass,The Ting Tings, Lady Sovereign, Miley Cyrus, Dar Williams, Avril Lavigne, 4minute 

(D) Food
Fried Chicken, Homemade Biscuits, Pot Roast, homemade Apple pie, Ice cream, Mexican

(E) Podcast
Security Now, Lance & Graal Pagan pod cast, CoffeeGeek and Celtic Myth Podshow

(F) TV Show : Off-air and On-air

Off-air:

Big Love, Black Adder, Upstairs, Downstairs, Secret Diary of a Call Girl, The West Wing, Commander in Chief, Smallville, Falling Skies, The Sopranos, True Blood, Fairly Legal, Necessary Roughness, Hellcats, House, Hung, Leverage, The Colbert Report, The Daily Show, The Gates, Merlin, Nikita, Top Gear UK, Sanctuary US, Hart of Dixie, Revolution, Defiance.

On-air: 

Pretty Little Liars, Teen Wolf, Supernatural, The Big Bang Theory, Arrow, Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., The Vampire Diaries, The 100, Elementary, Grimm, Continuum, Gotham, The Flash, The Originals, Bitten, Defiance, Dominion, Finding Carter, Rogue, Stitchers, Better Call Saul, Tyrant, Outlander. 
 
(G) (Anime)
1. Bamboo Blade
2. Bleach
3. Blood +
4. Claymore
5. Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion
6. Crest of the Stars
7. Familiar of Zero
8. Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood
9. Initial D
10. Log Horizon
11. Naruto Shippuden
12. Psycho-Pass
13. Soul Eater
14. Sword Art Online

(I) (Games) 
MineCraft, Bejeweled Twist,Magic: The Gathering and AD&D 2nd 
 
                          

Bragging rights
I have moved 104 times and have had 101 jobs, that said I did move 35 time before I got out of high school
Work
Occupation
Consultant
Employment
  • Host of The Helping Wiccan
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Networking
Other names
LordShrill, Lord Shrill, Damntion, Dartanyan Modisette

Stream

Dale Modisette

Shared publicly  - 
 
Now. this is good choreography for this song.

Published on Feb 7, 2016
May J Lee teaches choreography to Daddy by Psy feat.CL. 
1
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette
owner

Pagan News  - 
 
The Witch of Kings Cross: Lucy Cavendish on Sydney’s most notorious pagan
FEBRUARY 8, 20165:06AM
http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/true-stories/the-witch-of-kings-cross-lucy-cavendish-on-sydneys-most-notorious-pagan/news-story/346f3f7bc13399310b0f71abb5abc28f

WITH her dramatically arched eyebrows and vivid paintings on satanic themes, Rosaleen Norton shocked ’50s and ’60s Australia.
The ‘Witch of Kings Cross’ became notorious for her bizarre appearance and occult beliefs, and was condemned for making “obscene” works of art.
She was expelled from a Church of England girls’ school in NSW for corrupting the other girls and began busking, holding exhibitions and painting pagan murals on the streets, until her adventurous sex life scandalised society.

“Nowadays, she would be considered a prodigy,” Lucy Cavendish, a Sydney witch who has written a book featuring the outlandish artist, told news.com.au.
“She was an incredible artist and a gifted painter, but her subject matter wasn’t considered appropriate.
“I’ve been fascinated with Rosaleen for years. This unique look was a precursor to goth. Maybe she cultivated it for a reason, she didn’t want to be seen as pretty, but powerful.”
‘Roie’, as she was known, held pagan gatherings at her Kings Cross home, which was quickly raided by the police. She was charged with obscenity and became an infamous figure in the press.

Rosaleen, who appears in Ms Cavendish’s book Witches and Wizards alongside the most influential occult personalities of all time, was from then on doomed to be persecuted just like magical figures throughout history.

Her artworks were removed from exhibitions, and her books confiscated when they reached customs overseas.
Roie struck up a relationship with Eugene Goossens, a world-famous British conductor and composer who was friends with Noel Coward. At 54, he moved to Australia to take over the newly formed Sydney Symphony Orchestra and became close to Roie, attending secret rituals at her apartment.
A journalist from the UK ensured the couple’s downfall by infiltrating Roie’s coven and finding intimate letters between the pair.

Sir Goossens was stopped at customs and found with incense, erotic art and sex toys. He was deported and fined, humiliated in the eyes of the world. Roie was accused of destroying him.
She died penniless in 1979, but Lucy believes the Witch of Kings Cross paved the way for the outsiders and alternative figures who are so important in bringing change to the world.
Ms Cavendish, who owns broomsticks with different energies, casts spells for healing, but would never curse anyone or force them to fall in love.

“She was a very brave human,” she says of Rosaleen. “Her work was challenging, but so are classical paintings. She’s not just a heroine for counterculture but for anyone who marches to the beat of their own drum.
“She was never dependent, she lived an unconventional life and she was intensely intelligent. She’s an absolute inspiration for anyone doing it tough.”

Rosaleen, the subject of an upcoming documentary, was a predecessor to tens of thousands of witches and wizards now living in Australia, says Ms Cavendish.

The author aims to regain respect for pagan men and women through history up to today, looking at stories from King Arthur’s Merlin to a five-year-old girl shackled until she had a mental breakdown after the Salem witch trials.

“People like Aleister Crowley purposely set out to live as witches or wizards,” said Ms Cavendish. “We only hear the more outrageous tales, not that he introduced yoga to the West or was a devoted mountain climber, only the demonic side.”

Crowley had a huge influence on rock and pop music, inspiring David Bowie, Led Zeppelin and even Jay-Z. Ms Cavendish says during the ‘60s rock stars became “the new witches”, performing “acts of worship” on stage.
She credits pagans as pushing forward gay and transgender rights, with many arrested for homosexuality, but she says there are still more hurdles to break through.
“There are always people who push the boundaries a little further,” she said. “We’re still working through how different it’s OK to be.

“They encourage us to live our lives in more courageous ways, they have a bigger purpose. We need people like this.”

Order Witches and Wizards by Lucy Cavendish at Rockpool Publishing.
Email emma.reynolds@news.com.au or tweet
@emmareyn.
3
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette

Shared publicly  - 
 
Who want's their own Country?

Published on Apr 26, 2015
In April 2015 the nation of Liberland popped into existence. Can you really just show up and invent a brand new nation? Well, technically yes. So, how exactly do you do it?

Learn More:
Liberland
http://liberland.org/en/main/

Can Freedom-Loving Czechs Build a New Nation on the Danube?
http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2015/04/16/liberland_czech_libertarian_declares_new_nation_on_border_of_serbia_and.html
"Tired of high taxes, meddling bureaucrats, and the military-industrial complex? Forget voting for some watered-down sellout like Rand Paul and consider moving to the world's newest (sort of) country, Liberland."

Montevideo Convention on the Rights and Duties of States
http://www.cfr.org/sovereignty/montevideo-convention-rights-duties-states/p15897
"This treaty was signed at the International Conference of American States in Montevideo, Uruguay on December 26, 1933. It entered into force on December 26, 1934. The treaty discusses the definition and rights of statehood."

Westarctica | Mega-micronation in Antarctica
http://www.obs.com.mt/news/255/1/Westarctica-Mega-micronation-in-Antarctica
1
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette

Discussion  - 
 
I'm too out of shape for virtual reality
For the first time in my life, physical fitness matters for playing video games.
By Sean Buckley ,@seaniccus| Feb. 4, 2016
http://www.engadget.com/2016/02/04/im-too-out-of-shape-for-virtual-reality/

My knees and thighs ached. If my left shoulder moved more than half a foot out of its neutral position, it lit on fire. Breathing deeply made my back seize with stabbing waves of pain. My pride was hurt most of all. My physical ailments weren't the result of visiting the gym or training for a marathon -- they were the fallout of one afternoon of playing full-body virtual reality video games. Holy crap, am I out of shape.

I've always known that my sedentary lifestyle was killing me, but I never thought it would keep me from playing video games. Valve's SteamVR Developer Showcase proved otherwise, albeit unintentionally. Virtual reality is wholly unlike the so-called "active" games of the last decade.

In Wii Sports, you lazily waggle and swing a remote. With Kinect, you sloppily wave and "dance" to match an on-screen beat. In virtual reality, you just move. If it's an action game, you instinctively dodge a barrage of deadly lasers. You kneel down to hide behind a crate, only to leap up in a squat-jump to shoot at an enemy behind cover. You're not thinking about it, you're just doing what you have to in order to win. Twenty minutes later, and you've put yourself through an intense cardio workout.

That scenario sounds hypothetical, but it isn't -- that's exactly what happened to me last week playing demos for Hover Junkers, Space Pirate Trainer and AudioShield. Although I only spent 15 minutes with each of these games, all of them tricked me into being far more active than I planned. That, I realized, was what made being active in VR so different than playing contemporary motion-controlled games: I was exercising by accident.

Audioshield, for instance, had me blocking rapid-fire abstract missiles to the beat of Metallica's "No Leaf Clover," effectively putting me through short bursts of fast-paced shadow boxing. Hover Junkers forced me to duck behind virtual cover to avoid enemy fire in what amounted to a ten-minute squat routine. At the time, I just thought I was playing a game, but each experience left me gasping for breath. I shamefully realized the truth: I'm too out of shape to play some of the best VR games coming to first-generation headsets. That won't do.

For the first time in my life, video games are about to enact a positive change on my lifestyle. If I want to experience fast-paced action in standing, full-body VR of the kind I saw at Valve's SteamVR showcase, I'm going to need to get into better shape. As an inherently lazy man, I'm not happy about that -- but it's a reality I'm going to have to accept. Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go for a run. Because I want to play video games later. Man, the future is weird.
1
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette
owner

Moderators recommendations  - 
 
Book Review: Magick for the Elemental Witch by Deanna Anderson
By Jazz | February 1st, 2016
http://paganpages.org/content/2016/02/book-review-magick-for-the-elemental-witch-by-deanna-anderson/

Magick for the Elemental Witch, as a whole, was a very excellent and educational book. She covered such a vast array of topics and religions. I was very impressed. Honestly, the main downfall was there were some very obvious grammatical errors, especially once you hit the middle of the book. I would easily suggest this book to anyone wanting to expand their knowledge or if you are just starting out. Anderson talks about a great variety of things and I think anyone would be able to find something useful. She gives great personal examples and also talks about different spells. All-in-all, I’m a fan.

I would suggest people read the Forward and she explains how she will be doing the book and gives a bit of her background. Then her first chapter touches on the four classic elements. She breaks that down into 4 sections. The first one is about the basic elements. The thing that stood out the most from this chapter for me would be “Working with all the elements either separately or combined can really lend a sense of ‘old-world’ or ancient power to magick and rituals. Exploring and working with each element separately helps one to get attuned to that element and know it well, if it is an element that they feel a kinship to or it is of their birth sign it may even help a person explore their inner selves and learn more about themselves. When combining the elements it adds power to what a person is doing and gives a primal connection to the world, the universe and to life.”

Moving into section 2 she talks about correspondences. She talks about a lot of different cultures like Celtic, Chinese, Japanese, Hinduism, Buddhism and Tibetan. After that she moves into Tarot. She breaks down what Tarot is, and the basics and even talked about a new way of reading Tarots I had never heard of. She calls it the “Universal Message”, and she separates all the suits and arcana’s, where they each have a different area in life. The wands are the working life, swords the intellect, cups is emotional, pentacles are the physical life and the Major arcana represents the spiritual life. She does tough on Dragon Magick as well in this chapter, which I personally got pretty excited about, as not too many resources touch on that.

Section 3 is all about the Tools of the Elements. In the first paragraph Anderson states “… all of magick is based on a motto of “take what works for you and use it… paganism is the ideal path because of its flexibility and allowance of incorporating other ideas and influences into practice.” But, there was something she says when talking about the pentagram that I really don’t agree with. She talks about how the pentagram, when upside down is signifying materialism before the spirit and that it is used in Satanism. Now, I’ve briefly talked about this before in an old column. Allow me to quote myself. “One of the most controversial aspects of either symbol is when it is inverted. (2 points up, 1 down). It is seen as evil by not only Pagans, but Satanists, Christians and just the general public. It is often seen with a goats head drawn inside it. In my personal belief an inverted symbol is not evil at all, in fact even in Chinese Feng Shui and inverted pentagram can be used to banish. An inverted Pentacle is even used in the Gardnerian 2nd degree initiation. It shows that you need to deal with the darkness within yourself before it can rise up. Most modern day people avoid it since it is widely associated with Satanism but in historical times it wasn’t nearly as taboo and was in fact often used in banishing spells.” I personally even have some inverted pentacles tattooed on my arm. Mainly because I saw it as symbolizing the banishing of my past life, and moving onto a new life. Now, I don’t want to talk too much about myself here, and I’m sure many people would disagree, but I’m just stating my personal opinion.

Reaching the last section of The Four Classic Elements, Anderson writes about working with the elements. This was one of my favourite chapters and I took a lot away from it. She speaks of Low and High Magick, and sums it up greatly by saying “An easier way to remember this is that in Low Magick means the practitioner is doing the work and the God and Goddess are merely invited to the party. In High Magick the God and Goddess are the party being asked to do the work.” I love how she talks about Cauldrons and even mentions how to make specific cauldrons for each element. You also get a feel for her personal life as she makes personal connections and mentions her family and history lots. Anderson also touches calling and dismissing the quarters. She gave me a great idea on making a new charm bag, as I hadn’t made on in years. I love that about reading books like this, is sometimes it’s just a reminder and refresher. She gives some brief information on altars. Such a wonderful chapter. She packs a lot of information and just words things well. In this chapter alone I felt this would be a good recommendation for someone just starting out.

The first element she goes into is the Earth Element. There are 8 sections for this element. The first section is just a rough overview. “…to truly know the earth element is to rely on, utilize, and know intimately each of its cycles and what they can bring to us”. Then she gets into correspondences where she touches on a large number if things, and you get the feel for the format that she uses for the rest of the book. I did wish she had some pictures or drawings of some of the symbols she talks about. Luckily for me, I’m already familiar with most, if not all of these. She moves on to talk about the Tools of Earth and working with Earth. I love when she writes about the Witch Ladders. She goes into detail on how to make them and what they stand for. One section I was happy to read was all about all the different soils and salts one can work with. She even throws in a recipe on making your own bath salts, which I will be trying. Section 6 is all about rocks, stones and pebbles. Reading about this she mentions holey stones, worry stones, cornerstones and more. The next section is all about plants and trees. “ There is no harm in using natural vegetation for use in magick of mundane practices but make it a point to use what has fallen naturally, grow it for a specific use, or replace what was used.” She always mentions these nice reminders on respecting the earth and, I’m a supporter of that of course.

When she moves onto talking about flowers, there was a slightly funny grammatical error. I know she is talking about flowers, but there is a line that says” Today, people don’t think about the color of flowers but instead go with the basic red or with a floor that is the recipient’s favorite.” The end of the section she introduces me to the topic of a grass journal. I suggest people look into it. Wonderful idea. My favourite section is all about the mythology and folklore. One of my favourite lines is “Remember, the earth is over a million years old; so respect your elders”

Anderson then moves onto the water element. “…water gives life to animals, plants and humans; it is warm and relaxing; cool and refreshing; it nurtures and nourishes; it cleanses and cleans; it anoints and blesses and it is an essential element that we, as humans and pagans cannot do without.” Like I mentioned, she sticks to the same format for each element, so the first section is all about correspondences, where she explains some basic information and touches on various religions. The tools of water is next and then she moves into working with water. Which on the first page there was a sentence I really liked. “Another correspondence that may be surprising to some is that of mirrors; they are reflective surfaces like water and appear to have a depth to them like bodies of water do.” This stood out to me, as I believe she is very accurate when she writes about how not a lot of people think of a mirror as a tool.

Now, the section on sea salt and water is fantastic… except for the grammar issues again. There were a couple in this chapter, and honestly it’s a little distracting. There are wonderful points and it shows that Deanna is knowledgeable of at least four religions and is aware of their legends, mythology and origin stories. The next section as well has some major grammar issues. And it was in this section that I wondered if the book was edited at all. The information, of course, was accurate and can help a lot of beginners out. But, with grammar issues like “…but legend has it that they are doves and finding the, is believed to promote piece.” And “Maybe thee are from trees or branches that were broken….” How did ythee even make it past spell check?

The section on physical and metaphysical health has a recipe on a salt base for bath salts that I am going to be trying. I love the idea of making my own rather than buying them from the store. The section all about mythology and folklore is by far my favourite.

The next element Anderson moves onto is the air element. Again, she starts the chapter with a great description. “Air is our breath; it is our very existence and life. If we are sitting in our houses without water near us, no fireplace and our feet are not touching the bare earth we are still in the air element. It is all around us and is vital to our existence.” Section two is about correspondences, and section three on tools. She does a good job of explaining things in a way for new witches and a refresher for those who have been practicing for years. Section five is my favourite section for this element. It’s titled “When the wind blows” and mentions wind correspondences, wind in folklore, spells and rituals and has a fun idea about a balloon anger release and balloon wish. She writes about kites, leaves, divination and austromancy.

The following section is about our winged friends. Once she starts into insects, she is writing about an experience she had with bees and there is another grammatical error. “I kept seeing bees near my when normally I would never see any…”But, this whole chapter is fantastic. She touches on so much and does a great job of wording things in an easy to understand way. After that Anderson gets into Weather magick. Now, she had mentioned before, and she touches on it again that you need to be careful while working with weather magick as you don’t want to fool around with Mother Nature. She does write about cloud scrying, which is one of my favourite things to do. I’ve always been drawn to looking at the clouds, so I was happy that she mentioned it.

Getting into the mythology and folklore section she states “The creation of air is one of no creation at all. Of all the elements in this book, air is the one that seems to always have been around and was not created by anything or anyone. Fire was given to or stolen by the humans, earth was created by gods, water came from the skies or melted from glaciers, but air was always around and not created. It is one of the elements often taken for granted and yet we can only live a few moments without it.” I love this. I think she worded it well. After that she does get into elementals and has a nice variety there.

Next is the fire element. “Regardless of how it is used, fire has a long history in the world and with that comes a long history of superstition, folklore and magick.” Fire is my element, so I loved reading this whole section, even though I already knew most of it. When she talks about the tools of fire in section 3, of course, the candle comes up. “Early occultists believed that the candle represented a human in that the flame was the spirit, the wick was the mind (or intellect) and the wax was the physical form. A candle can also represent all five classic elements with the flame as fire. Melted was as water, solid wax as earth, smoke as air and the spark that created it as spirit.” Section four is about working with fire and section five is all about flames and fire.

The section on flames and fire is well done. She touches on a lot, and gives some older and newer information. She throws in a few spells and rituals and the chakra spell is one I will be trying. I’m surprised I haven’t thought of doing it yet. Deana touches on ashes and smoke in the next section and mentions believe it or not… the boy scouts!

She moves into a section called “Fire in the Skies” which mentions things like meteors, the sun, stars and lightning. Again, more grammar issues, like putting the word starts instead of stars. Anderson touched on fire mythology, which is a great section. I personally really enjoyed when she talked about the phoenix.

Last, but not least, Anderson reaches the element spirit. Now, I’ve read about all the elements before, and some mention spirit, while others do not. I’m glad she did. Section three is all about the tools of spirit, and I was pleased to see she mentioned the poppet. I love poppets. She writes “Poppets are instruments of magick that are used to cause something to occur to a particular person. This is a form of sympathetic magick, which means that the action by the practitioner resembles what they want the outcome to be.”

Section five is all about “The Incorporeal Soul” and is about ancestral worship. Sabbats, spirits. And divination. My favourite topic in the spirit element is about animism, which is something I feel strongly about. “Animism is a widely accepted belief system that follows a doctrine that everything in nature, either animate of inanimate, has a consciousness or soul.” She writes about some spells, totem poles, spirit houses, effigies, and again, divination. All in all a very informative chapter. The second last section is about the hidden realms, which is sometimes called the Otherworld. She touches on some magick that just seems fun and sometimes I will be looking into more. Can you guess what the last section is about? Mythology and folklore of course. Again, some great points are made and she shows her knowledge of various religions.

Overall, this book is a great read. I would strongly suggest this book. Literally, the main negative thing I have to ding it for would be the grammar and spelling. I would suggest people just starting out in the pagan/wiccan path read this book. It’s filled with wonderful insight and she touches on a vast array of topics, and the format of the book was well planned. I will be looking to read more from the Copper Cauldron books, and hopefully the grammar is better. Deanna Anderson knows her stuff. I’m very fortunate to have gotten the chance to review this book and I hope I did it justice.
2
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette

Shared publicly  - 
 
I know now what they mean by only time will tell.
These two photographs of OAB's Botanical Garden Barcelona composed into an animated GIF are a reminder to architects – if an obvious point to landscape architects – that landscapes have a way of changing pretty quickly. [Photos: Alejo Bagué, via Spanish-Architects] ...
1
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette
owner

Pagan News  - 
 
The Witch of Kings Cross: Lucy Cavendish on Sydney’s most notorious pagan
FEBRUARY 8, 20165:06AM
http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/true-stories/the-witch-of-kings-cross-lucy-cavendish-on-sydneys-most-notorious-pagan/news-story/346f3f7bc13399310b0f71abb5abc28f

WITH her dramatically arched eyebrows and vivid paintings on satanic themes, Rosaleen Norton shocked ’50s and ’60s Australia.
The ‘Witch of Kings Cross’ became notorious for her bizarre appearance and occult beliefs, and was condemned for making “obscene” works of art.
She was expelled from a Church of England girls’ school in NSW for corrupting the other girls and began busking, holding exhibitions and painting pagan murals on the streets, until her adventurous sex life scandalised society.

“Nowadays, she would be considered a prodigy,” Lucy Cavendish, a Sydney witch who has written a book featuring the outlandish artist, told news.com.au.
“She was an incredible artist and a gifted painter, but her subject matter wasn’t considered appropriate.
“I’ve been fascinated with Rosaleen for years. This unique look was a precursor to goth. Maybe she cultivated it for a reason, she didn’t want to be seen as pretty, but powerful.”
‘Roie’, as she was known, held pagan gatherings at her Kings Cross home, which was quickly raided by the police. She was charged with obscenity and became an infamous figure in the press.

Rosaleen, who appears in Ms Cavendish’s book Witches and Wizards alongside the most influential occult personalities of all time, was from then on doomed to be persecuted just like magical figures throughout history.

Her artworks were removed from exhibitions, and her books confiscated when they reached customs overseas.
Roie struck up a relationship with Eugene Goossens, a world-famous British conductor and composer who was friends with Noel Coward. At 54, he moved to Australia to take over the newly formed Sydney Symphony Orchestra and became close to Roie, attending secret rituals at her apartment.
A journalist from the UK ensured the couple’s downfall by infiltrating Roie’s coven and finding intimate letters between the pair.

Sir Goossens was stopped at customs and found with incense, erotic art and sex toys. He was deported and fined, humiliated in the eyes of the world. Roie was accused of destroying him.
She died penniless in 1979, but Lucy believes the Witch of Kings Cross paved the way for the outsiders and alternative figures who are so important in bringing change to the world.
Ms Cavendish, who owns broomsticks with different energies, casts spells for healing, but would never curse anyone or force them to fall in love.

“She was a very brave human,” she says of Rosaleen. “Her work was challenging, but so are classical paintings. She’s not just a heroine for counterculture but for anyone who marches to the beat of their own drum.
“She was never dependent, she lived an unconventional life and she was intensely intelligent. She’s an absolute inspiration for anyone doing it tough.”

Rosaleen, the subject of an upcoming documentary, was a predecessor to tens of thousands of witches and wizards now living in Australia, says Ms Cavendish.

The author aims to regain respect for pagan men and women through history up to today, looking at stories from King Arthur’s Merlin to a five-year-old girl shackled until she had a mental breakdown after the Salem witch trials.

“People like Aleister Crowley purposely set out to live as witches or wizards,” said Ms Cavendish. “We only hear the more outrageous tales, not that he introduced yoga to the West or was a devoted mountain climber, only the demonic side.”

Crowley had a huge influence on rock and pop music, inspiring David Bowie, Led Zeppelin and even Jay-Z. Ms Cavendish says during the ‘60s rock stars became “the new witches”, performing “acts of worship” on stage.
She credits pagans as pushing forward gay and transgender rights, with many arrested for homosexuality, but she says there are still more hurdles to break through.
“There are always people who push the boundaries a little further,” she said. “We’re still working through how different it’s OK to be.

“They encourage us to live our lives in more courageous ways, they have a bigger purpose. We need people like this.”

Order Witches and Wizards by Lucy Cavendish at Rockpool Publishing.
Email emma.reynolds@news.com.au or tweet
@emmareyn.
1
Add a comment...
 
How to Use the Coffee Taster’s Flavor Wheel in 8 Steps
By The Specialty Coffee Chronicle | February 5, 2016
http://www.scaa.org/chronicle/2016/02/05/how-to-use-the-coffee-tasters-flavor-wheel-in-8-steps/

The Coffee Tasters Flavor Wheel, a collaborative effort by the Specialty Coffee Association of America and World Coffee Research, is designed to be a tool for the coffee taster. As a tool, it is meant to be intuitive, enjoyable to use, and a benefit to those who seek to analyze and describe coffees. Here are a few tips on how to use the wheel properly.

Step 1: Take it All In

The wheel is meant to be beautiful, like the greatest coffees can be. It represents a comprehensive, kaleidoscopic picture of coffee flavor. Let the words wash over you, and soak it in. You might see some words you’re not familiar with. That’s ok, we’ll deal with those later. For now, just marvel at the possible complexity of coffee.

Step 2: Taste some Coffee

The flavor wheel can be used either in casual tasting or professional coffee cupping. In either situation, the key is to taste mindfully. Prepare the coffee carefully, observing the coffee at different stages: the fragrance just after grinding, the aromas which escape the moment water hits the coffee grounds, and the flavors that fill the palate when the coffee is sipped. ‘Flavor’ is defined as a combination of taste and smell, and the flavor wheel contains attributes on the entire continuum between basic tastes (those things perceived only by the tongue) to pure aromatics (those things that only can be smelled). Most flavors, however, are a mixture of the senses: the sourness and unique aromatics of the lemon, for example, or the sweetness, bitterness, and characteristic aromatics of molasses. Notice the coffee and its flavors. Now turn to the wheel.

Step 3: Start at the Center

The wheel’s design encourages the taster to start at the center, and work outward. The most general taste descriptors are near the center, and they get more specific as the tiers work outward. The taster can stop anywhere along the way, but the farther outward the taster works, the more specific the description might be. As an example, the coffee taster might detect a fruitiness when tasting a coffee from Ethiopia. Moving through the ‘fruity’ section of the wheel, they are confronted with a choice: is the fruitiness reminiscent of berries, dried fruit, citrus fruit, or something else? If the taster decides ‘citrus fruit’, they then can sharpen the descriptor: is it ‘grapefruit’, ‘orange’, ‘lemon’ or ‘lime’? Having identified that flavor, the taster can move back to the center and start again, zeroing in on another flavor, and another, until they feel their description of the coffee is complete. This is the basic function of the wheel, and can be used very simply at that level. However, there is more to the wheel, and the expert taster can move further.

Step 4: Read the Lexicon

The Coffee Tasters Flavor Wheel is based on the World Coffee Research Sensory Lexicon, a standard set of attributes designed to allow trained sensory panels evaluate coffees for scientific research purposes. Although the vast majority of flavor wheel users will not be trained in this methodology, the lexicon can still be used to define the attributes represented on the wheel. Each attribute has a definition and a ‘reference’, which can be used to calibrate tasters who may seek clarification on specific attributes. The flavor wheel and lexicon therefore work best in tandem, the taster referencing the lexicon for attribute descriptors and references if needed. The lexicon is a tool for sensory panels trained in descriptive analysis, but offers a great source of information for the professional taster. There will be unfamiliar words to many- technical and chemical descriptions of flavors- but the lexicon explains them clearly and provides sensory references for all of its attributes.

Step 5: Check out some References

Every attribute in the WCR lexicon has a reference, and many of these references are readily available in supermarkets and from online sources. Keeping in mind that aromatic references (noted as such) should never be ingested, though flavor references can be, you can taste and smell the references to orient yourself to those flavors in coffee. Many references are suggested to be smelled from snifters, which concentrate the aromatics. Take notes. Work on your sense memory.

Step 6: Start at the Center Again

With a knowledge of the Lexicon Attributes in mind (perhaps even having referenced an attribute or two) taste a coffee and start in the center again, working your way out to a specific attribute. Now, look to the neighboring attributes. You may notice the attribute ‘cells’ appear to be a different distance from one another. If two attribute cells are connected, it means that the professional tasters in our research thought of these attributes as being closely related, and if there is a gap, that means the tasters thought of them as being slightly less closely related. The further the gap extends to the center of the wheel, the less closely related the tasters found the attribute descriptors to each other. This might be helpful when ‘calibrating’ coffee descriptors to other tasters’ experiences, or designing taste descriptors that are intelligible to the maximum number of people.

Step 7: Use your Words

The great thing about these tools is that they form a foundational common language for coffee tasters. The existence of an industry-standard wheel means that all coffee professionals can study a common document, have it in our tasting labs and shops, and base our communication on a shared set of terms. While imaginative descriptors and flights of fancy are great, sometimes they make communication more difficult. In certain contexts, therefore, focusing on common language—illustrated in the wheel—is just the thing for those who seek to communicate about coffee.

Step 8: Study the Colors

Our visual sense is strongly connected with our other senses, and the way foods look give us important cues to how they are likely to taste. For this reason, we often use visual terms to describe flavor: a coffee can taste “bright” or “red” or “green”. With this awareness, we paid special attention to the colors on the wheel, trying hard to link the terms with colors that represent the attribute clearly. This might help a struggling taster find a descriptor: if they can only articulate “it tastes like a red fruit of some kind”, the taster can scan the red-colored attributes on the wheel. “Something brown” might send the taster to the left side of the wheel, where the brown territory is, perhaps stimulating the awareness of spice or grain notes.

More ways to use this wheel will doubtlessly emerge as tasters, teachers, sensory scientists, and coffee professionals engage with and use this tool. We are eager to explore new techniques and ideas!
1
1
Anthony Versino's profile photo
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette
owner

Video  - 
 
Published on Apr 26, 2015
In April 2015 the nation of Liberland popped into existence. Can you really just show up and invent a brand new nation? Well, technically yes. So, how exactly do you do it?

Learn More:
Liberland
http://liberland.org/en/main/

Can Freedom-Loving Czechs Build a New Nation on the Danube?
http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2015/04/16/liberland_czech_libertarian_declares_new_nation_on_border_of_serbia_and.html
"Tired of high taxes, meddling bureaucrats, and the military-industrial complex? Forget voting for some watered-down sellout like Rand Paul and consider moving to the world's newest (sort of) country, Liberland."

Montevideo Convention on the Rights and Duties of States
http://www.cfr.org/sovereignty/montevideo-convention-rights-duties-states/p15897
"This treaty was signed at the International Conference of American States in Montevideo, Uruguay on December 26, 1933. It entered into force on December 26, 1934. The treaty discusses the definition and rights of statehood."

Westarctica | Mega-micronation in Antarctica
http://www.obs.com.mt/news/255/1/Westarctica-Mega-micronation-in-Antarctica
1
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm too out of shape for virtual reality
For the first time in my life, physical fitness matters for playing video games.
By Sean Buckley ,@seaniccus| Feb. 4, 2016
http://www.engadget.com/2016/02/04/im-too-out-of-shape-for-virtual-reality/

My knees and thighs ached. If my left shoulder moved more than half a foot out of its neutral position, it lit on fire. Breathing deeply made my back seize with stabbing waves of pain. My pride was hurt most of all. My physical ailments weren't the result of visiting the gym or training for a marathon -- they were the fallout of one afternoon of playing full-body virtual reality video games. Holy crap, am I out of shape.

I've always known that my sedentary lifestyle was killing me, but I never thought it would keep me from playing video games. Valve's SteamVR Developer Showcase proved otherwise, albeit unintentionally. Virtual reality is wholly unlike the so-called "active" games of the last decade.

In Wii Sports, you lazily waggle and swing a remote. With Kinect, you sloppily wave and "dance" to match an on-screen beat. In virtual reality, you just move. If it's an action game, you instinctively dodge a barrage of deadly lasers. You kneel down to hide behind a crate, only to leap up in a squat-jump to shoot at an enemy behind cover. You're not thinking about it, you're just doing what you have to in order to win. Twenty minutes later, and you've put yourself through an intense cardio workout.

That scenario sounds hypothetical, but it isn't -- that's exactly what happened to me last week playing demos for Hover Junkers, Space Pirate Trainer and AudioShield. Although I only spent 15 minutes with each of these games, all of them tricked me into being far more active than I planned. That, I realized, was what made being active in VR so different than playing contemporary motion-controlled games: I was exercising by accident.

Audioshield, for instance, had me blocking rapid-fire abstract missiles to the beat of Metallica's "No Leaf Clover," effectively putting me through short bursts of fast-paced shadow boxing. Hover Junkers forced me to duck behind virtual cover to avoid enemy fire in what amounted to a ten-minute squat routine. At the time, I just thought I was playing a game, but each experience left me gasping for breath. I shamefully realized the truth: I'm too out of shape to play some of the best VR games coming to first-generation headsets. That won't do.

For the first time in my life, video games are about to enact a positive change on my lifestyle. If I want to experience fast-paced action in standing, full-body VR of the kind I saw at Valve's SteamVR showcase, I'm going to need to get into better shape. As an inherently lazy man, I'm not happy about that -- but it's a reality I'm going to have to accept. Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go for a run. Because I want to play video games later. Man, the future is weird.
1
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Book Review: Magick for the Elemental Witch by Deanna Anderson
By Jazz | February 1st, 2016
http://paganpages.org/content/2016/02/book-review-magick-for-the-elemental-witch-by-deanna-anderson/

Magick for the Elemental Witch, as a whole, was a very excellent and educational book. She covered such a vast array of topics and religions. I was very impressed. Honestly, the main downfall was there were some very obvious grammatical errors, especially once you hit the middle of the book. I would easily suggest this book to anyone wanting to expand their knowledge or if you are just starting out. Anderson talks about a great variety of things and I think anyone would be able to find something useful. She gives great personal examples and also talks about different spells. All-in-all, I’m a fan.

I would suggest people read the Forward and she explains how she will be doing the book and gives a bit of her background. Then her first chapter touches on the four classic elements. She breaks that down into 4 sections. The first one is about the basic elements. The thing that stood out the most from this chapter for me would be “Working with all the elements either separately or combined can really lend a sense of ‘old-world’ or ancient power to magick and rituals. Exploring and working with each element separately helps one to get attuned to that element and know it well, if it is an element that they feel a kinship to or it is of their birth sign it may even help a person explore their inner selves and learn more about themselves. When combining the elements it adds power to what a person is doing and gives a primal connection to the world, the universe and to life.”

Moving into section 2 she talks about correspondences. She talks about a lot of different cultures like Celtic, Chinese, Japanese, Hinduism, Buddhism and Tibetan. After that she moves into Tarot. She breaks down what Tarot is, and the basics and even talked about a new way of reading Tarots I had never heard of. She calls it the “Universal Message”, and she separates all the suits and arcana’s, where they each have a different area in life. The wands are the working life, swords the intellect, cups is emotional, pentacles are the physical life and the Major arcana represents the spiritual life. She does tough on Dragon Magick as well in this chapter, which I personally got pretty excited about, as not too many resources touch on that.

Section 3 is all about the Tools of the Elements. In the first paragraph Anderson states “… all of magick is based on a motto of “take what works for you and use it… paganism is the ideal path because of its flexibility and allowance of incorporating other ideas and influences into practice.” But, there was something she says when talking about the pentagram that I really don’t agree with. She talks about how the pentagram, when upside down is signifying materialism before the spirit and that it is used in Satanism. Now, I’ve briefly talked about this before in an old column. Allow me to quote myself. “One of the most controversial aspects of either symbol is when it is inverted. (2 points up, 1 down). It is seen as evil by not only Pagans, but Satanists, Christians and just the general public. It is often seen with a goats head drawn inside it. In my personal belief an inverted symbol is not evil at all, in fact even in Chinese Feng Shui and inverted pentagram can be used to banish. An inverted Pentacle is even used in the Gardnerian 2nd degree initiation. It shows that you need to deal with the darkness within yourself before it can rise up. Most modern day people avoid it since it is widely associated with Satanism but in historical times it wasn’t nearly as taboo and was in fact often used in banishing spells.” I personally even have some inverted pentacles tattooed on my arm. Mainly because I saw it as symbolizing the banishing of my past life, and moving onto a new life. Now, I don’t want to talk too much about myself here, and I’m sure many people would disagree, but I’m just stating my personal opinion.

Reaching the last section of The Four Classic Elements, Anderson writes about working with the elements. This was one of my favourite chapters and I took a lot away from it. She speaks of Low and High Magick, and sums it up greatly by saying “An easier way to remember this is that in Low Magick means the practitioner is doing the work and the God and Goddess are merely invited to the party. In High Magick the God and Goddess are the party being asked to do the work.” I love how she talks about Cauldrons and even mentions how to make specific cauldrons for each element. You also get a feel for her personal life as she makes personal connections and mentions her family and history lots. Anderson also touches calling and dismissing the quarters. She gave me a great idea on making a new charm bag, as I hadn’t made on in years. I love that about reading books like this, is sometimes it’s just a reminder and refresher. She gives some brief information on altars. Such a wonderful chapter. She packs a lot of information and just words things well. In this chapter alone I felt this would be a good recommendation for someone just starting out.

The first element she goes into is the Earth Element. There are 8 sections for this element. The first section is just a rough overview. “…to truly know the earth element is to rely on, utilize, and know intimately each of its cycles and what they can bring to us”. Then she gets into correspondences where she touches on a large number if things, and you get the feel for the format that she uses for the rest of the book. I did wish she had some pictures or drawings of some of the symbols she talks about. Luckily for me, I’m already familiar with most, if not all of these. She moves on to talk about the Tools of Earth and working with Earth. I love when she writes about the Witch Ladders. She goes into detail on how to make them and what they stand for. One section I was happy to read was all about all the different soils and salts one can work with. She even throws in a recipe on making your own bath salts, which I will be trying. Section 6 is all about rocks, stones and pebbles. Reading about this she mentions holey stones, worry stones, cornerstones and more. The next section is all about plants and trees. “ There is no harm in using natural vegetation for use in magick of mundane practices but make it a point to use what has fallen naturally, grow it for a specific use, or replace what was used.” She always mentions these nice reminders on respecting the earth and, I’m a supporter of that of course.

When she moves onto talking about flowers, there was a slightly funny grammatical error. I know she is talking about flowers, but there is a line that says” Today, people don’t think about the color of flowers but instead go with the basic red or with a floor that is the recipient’s favorite.” The end of the section she introduces me to the topic of a grass journal. I suggest people look into it. Wonderful idea. My favourite section is all about the mythology and folklore. One of my favourite lines is “Remember, the earth is over a million years old; so respect your elders”

Anderson then moves onto the water element. “…water gives life to animals, plants and humans; it is warm and relaxing; cool and refreshing; it nurtures and nourishes; it cleanses and cleans; it anoints and blesses and it is an essential element that we, as humans and pagans cannot do without.” Like I mentioned, she sticks to the same format for each element, so the first section is all about correspondences, where she explains some basic information and touches on various religions. The tools of water is next and then she moves into working with water. Which on the first page there was a sentence I really liked. “Another correspondence that may be surprising to some is that of mirrors; they are reflective surfaces like water and appear to have a depth to them like bodies of water do.” This stood out to me, as I believe she is very accurate when she writes about how not a lot of people think of a mirror as a tool.

Now, the section on sea salt and water is fantastic… except for the grammar issues again. There were a couple in this chapter, and honestly it’s a little distracting. There are wonderful points and it shows that Deanna is knowledgeable of at least four religions and is aware of their legends, mythology and origin stories. The next section as well has some major grammar issues. And it was in this section that I wondered if the book was edited at all. The information, of course, was accurate and can help a lot of beginners out. But, with grammar issues like “…but legend has it that they are doves and finding the, is believed to promote piece.” And “Maybe thee are from trees or branches that were broken….” How did ythee even make it past spell check?

The section on physical and metaphysical health has a recipe on a salt base for bath salts that I am going to be trying. I love the idea of making my own rather than buying them from the store. The section all about mythology and folklore is by far my favourite.

The next element Anderson moves onto is the air element. Again, she starts the chapter with a great description. “Air is our breath; it is our very existence and life. If we are sitting in our houses without water near us, no fireplace and our feet are not touching the bare earth we are still in the air element. It is all around us and is vital to our existence.” Section two is about correspondences, and section three on tools. She does a good job of explaining things in a way for new witches and a refresher for those who have been practicing for years. Section five is my favourite section for this element. It’s titled “When the wind blows” and mentions wind correspondences, wind in folklore, spells and rituals and has a fun idea about a balloon anger release and balloon wish. She writes about kites, leaves, divination and austromancy.

The following section is about our winged friends. Once she starts into insects, she is writing about an experience she had with bees and there is another grammatical error. “I kept seeing bees near my when normally I would never see any…”But, this whole chapter is fantastic. She touches on so much and does a great job of wording things in an easy to understand way. After that Anderson gets into Weather magick. Now, she had mentioned before, and she touches on it again that you need to be careful while working with weather magick as you don’t want to fool around with Mother Nature. She does write about cloud scrying, which is one of my favourite things to do. I’ve always been drawn to looking at the clouds, so I was happy that she mentioned it.

Getting into the mythology and folklore section she states “The creation of air is one of no creation at all. Of all the elements in this book, air is the one that seems to always have been around and was not created by anything or anyone. Fire was given to or stolen by the humans, earth was created by gods, water came from the skies or melted from glaciers, but air was always around and not created. It is one of the elements often taken for granted and yet we can only live a few moments without it.” I love this. I think she worded it well. After that she does get into elementals and has a nice variety there.

Next is the fire element. “Regardless of how it is used, fire has a long history in the world and with that comes a long history of superstition, folklore and magick.” Fire is my element, so I loved reading this whole section, even though I already knew most of it. When she talks about the tools of fire in section 3, of course, the candle comes up. “Early occultists believed that the candle represented a human in that the flame was the spirit, the wick was the mind (or intellect) and the wax was the physical form. A candle can also represent all five classic elements with the flame as fire. Melted was as water, solid wax as earth, smoke as air and the spark that created it as spirit.” Section four is about working with fire and section five is all about flames and fire.

The section on flames and fire is well done. She touches on a lot, and gives some older and newer information. She throws in a few spells and rituals and the chakra spell is one I will be trying. I’m surprised I haven’t thought of doing it yet. Deana touches on ashes and smoke in the next section and mentions believe it or not… the boy scouts!

She moves into a section called “Fire in the Skies” which mentions things like meteors, the sun, stars and lightning. Again, more grammar issues, like putting the word starts instead of stars. Anderson touched on fire mythology, which is a great section. I personally really enjoyed when she talked about the phoenix.

Last, but not least, Anderson reaches the element spirit. Now, I’ve read about all the elements before, and some mention spirit, while others do not. I’m glad she did. Section three is all about the tools of spirit, and I was pleased to see she mentioned the poppet. I love poppets. She writes “Poppets are instruments of magick that are used to cause something to occur to a particular person. This is a form of sympathetic magick, which means that the action by the practitioner resembles what they want the outcome to be.”

Section five is all about “The Incorporeal Soul” and is about ancestral worship. Sabbats, spirits. And divination. My favourite topic in the spirit element is about animism, which is something I feel strongly about. “Animism is a widely accepted belief system that follows a doctrine that everything in nature, either animate of inanimate, has a consciousness or soul.” She writes about some spells, totem poles, spirit houses, effigies, and again, divination. All in all a very informative chapter. The second last section is about the hidden realms, which is sometimes called the Otherworld. She touches on some magick that just seems fun and sometimes I will be looking into more. Can you guess what the last section is about? Mythology and folklore of course. Again, some great points are made and she shows her knowledge of various religions.

Overall, this book is a great read. I would strongly suggest this book. Literally, the main negative thing I have to ding it for would be the grammar and spelling. I would suggest people just starting out in the pagan/wiccan path read this book. It’s filled with wonderful insight and she touches on a vast array of topics, and the format of the book was well planned. I will be looking to read more from the Copper Cauldron books, and hopefully the grammar is better. Deanna Anderson knows her stuff. I’m very fortunate to have gotten the chance to review this book and I hope I did it justice.
1
Add a comment...

Dale Modisette

Shared publicly  - 
 
Published on May 20, 2014
Even Ramis himself couldn't make up his mind on how long Phil spends in the loop. So instead of wasting any more time wracking our brains, we got Simon Gallagher to investigate and set the record straight once and for all!

Check out the original article at:
http://whatculture.com/film/just-how-many-days-does-bill-murray-really-spend-stuck-reliving-groundhog-day.php
1
Add a comment...
Dale Modisette's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Affnan's Aquaponics: Back Lane CRAFT Set Goes Guttergrowbed
www.affnanaquaponics.com

I use the standard Solvent Cement for PVC and it does work really well. Use a fresh bottle and apply generously, it will seal good. As state

Don't Lose Focus
wiccanmoonsong.blogspot.com

original graphic by Rainvine Don't Lose Focus Merry Meet :)))))))) So most of you know that I finally managed to get myself a gym membership

Shark's Teeth (Marla Mason, #5.5)
www.goodreads.com

Author of Blood Engines, Poison Sleep, Dead Reign, Spell Games, Broken Mirrors, Bone Shop, Grim Tides, Bride of Death, Pale Dog, and Shark's

World of Keralis
www.keralis.net

Creative & Survival Servers: Epic Cities and Community!

Minecraft
minecraft.net

Minecraft is a game about placing blocks to build anything you can imagine. At night monsters come out, make sure to build a shelter before

T-Mobile updates its network coverage map to add in real-world customer ...
www.fiercewireless.com

T-Mobile US, which has worked to set itself apart from its competitors as the "uncarrier," said it has found another avenue for differentiat

Turkish Men Wear Miniskirts In Support Of Women’s Rights After Brutal Mu...
www.inquisitr.com

The brutal murder of 20-year-old Ozgecan Aslan has sparked such outrage in Turkey that men took to the streets wearing miniskirts, in suppor

First Look: Chloe Neill’s Dark Debt (March 3, 2015) by Jennifer Myers
www.heroesandheartbreakers.com

A new challenge arises for Meri and Ethan in the eleventh book in Chloe Neill's Chicagoland Vampires series, Dark Debt.

INFOGRAPHIC: How to choose the best HVAC for your home and the planet
inhabitat.com

Choosing the right HVAC for your home can benefit your wallet, your house and the planet.

Don't 'abhor' us - abhor GMO scientists laden with conflicts of interest!
www.theecologist.org

Africa's biotech establishment is deploying its biggest guns to attack NGOs opposed to GMO crops to help push through Ghana's corporation-fr

Smart Seattle dog rides the bus by herself to the dog park
inhabitat.com

A two-year-old black labrador in Seattle sometimes rides the bus alone to meet her owner at the local dog park.

Green surge - 13 reasons why the Greens are a party whose time has come
www.theecologist.org

Yesterday, Green party membership in the UK overtook that of UKIP and the Lib Dems, writes Adam Ramsay, who offers 13 reasons why in just tw

Narcissus in Chains (Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter, #10)
www.goodreads.com

Author of Guilty Pleasures, Circus of the Damned, The Laughing Corpse, The Lunatic Cafe, Bloody Bones, The Killing Dance, Burnt Offerings, B

Shifting Shadows Audiobook Torrent Downloads, Free Audio Books Search Re...
theaudiobookbay.com

Search for Shifting Shadows audio books, unabridged audiobook torrent download for free.

Three Simple Tricks to Make Your Chromebook More Like a Real Laptop | WIRED
www.wired.com

After a few weeks of using a bare-bones 13-inch Toshiba Chromebook as my primary laptop, I found it isn't hard to achieve pretty much everyt

One in four Americans want their state to secede from the U.S., but why?
blogs.reuters.com

For the past few weeks, as Scotland debated the wisdom of independence, Reuters has been asking Americans how they would feel about declarin

I love going on Tuesdays because I can get two piece of chicken for $1.19 (was 99 cent until January 2015). I buy 15 to 20 orders to make up TV dinners for I live on a budget.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
1 review
Map
Map
Map