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Dale Andersen
Works at Carl Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, SETI Institute
Attended McGill University
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RIP Edgar Mitchell, Apollo 14 lunar module pilot
             September 17, 1930 - February 4, 2016

Walking on the Moon,  February 5, 1971 at the Fra Mauro formation with 9 hours 23 minutes on the lunar surface!      

Astronaut Edgar Mitchell, lunar module pilot on Apollo 14, passed away Thursday in West Palm Beach, Fla., on the eve of the 45th anniversary of his lunar landing.


http://www.nasa.gov/feature/apollo-astronaut-edgar-mitchell-dies-at-age-85 
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Explorer 1: On this day, the U.S. truely enters the space race

In 58 years we have gone from just being able to launch small payloads into low earth orbit to placing astronauts on the surface of the moon, the robotic exploration of Mars and all of the other planets in our solar system....and so much more.  What will the next 58 years bring us?  Hopefully that will include placing humans on the surface of Mars with the intent of developing a permanent presence there, and with a long-term goal of science and exploration much like we now have in Antarctica.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/explorer/explorer-overview.htm

On Jan. 31, 1958, the U.S. Army launched Explorer 1, the nation’s first successful man-made satellite, from Cape Canaveral, as part of the International Geophysical Year (1957-58). The satellite was launched aboard a Jupiter-C rocket. Instrumentation on board led to the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts.

Explorer 1 was the first satellite launched by the United States when it was sent into space on January 31, 1958. Following the launch of the Soviet Union's Sputnik 1 on October 4, 1957, the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency was directed to launch a satellite using its Jupiter C rocket developed under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory received the assignment to design, build and operate the artificial satellite that would serve as the rocket's payload. JPL completed this job in less than three months.

The primary science instrument on Explorer 1 was a cosmic ray detector designed to measure the radiation environment in Earth orbit. Once in space this experiment, provided by Dr. James Van Allen of the University of Iowa, revealed a much lower cosmic ray count than expected. Van Allen theorized that the instrument may have been saturated by very strong radiation from a belt of charged particles trapped in space by Earth's magnetic field. The existence of these radiation belts was confirmed by another U.S. satellite launched two months later, and they became known as the Van Allen Belts in honor of their discoverer.

Explorer 1 revolved around Earth in a looping orbit that took it as close as 354 kilometers (220 miles) to Earth and as far as 2,515 kilometers (1,563 miles). It made one orbit every 114.8 minutes, or a total of 12.54 orbits per day. The satellite itself was 203 centimeters (80 inches) long and 15.9 centimeters (6.25 inches) in diameter. Explorer 1 made its final transmission on May 23, 1958. It entered Earth's atmosphere and burned up on March 31, 1970, after more than 58,000 orbits. The satellite weighed 14 kilograms (30.8 pounds).

A launch attempt of a similar satellite, Explorer 2, was made on March 5, 1958, but the fourth stage of the Jupiter-C rocket failed to ignite. Explorer 3 was successfully launched on March 26, 1958, and operated until June 16 of that year. Explorer 4 was launched July 26, 1958, and operated until October 6 of that year. Launch of Explorer 5 on August 24, 1958, failed when the rocket's booster collided with its second stage after separation, causing the firing angle of the upper stage to be incorrect

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The Switch: A Bill Stanley Story

This short video relates a great story of a young boy, his curiosity, fear and courage that led to a life in science. A story that should be repeated far more often today - so encourage all kids - girls, boys, men and women to ask questions and to try to understand the world around them!

Director of Collections Bill Stanley told and retold a story from his own life—when "the switch" went on and he fell in love with science. Bill's story exemplifies the mission of natural history museums: to encourage anyone, from youngsters to adults, to pursue discoveries and to foster a love and understanding of science and natural history. 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwaaH6ILs40
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Girls on Ice, a free wilderness education program, is accepting applications now through Jan. 29


http://news.uaf.edu/application-deadline-approaching-for-free-glaciology-program-for-high-school-girls/
Girls on Ice, a free wilderness education program, is accepting applications now through Jan. 29. Each year, two teams of nine teenage girls and three instructors spend 12 days exploring and learning about mountain glaciers and alpine landscapes in Alaska or Washington through scientific field studies with professional glaciologists, artists and mountaineers.
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National Academy of Sciences  Award in Early Earth and Life Sciences

Congratulations to Jim Kasting at Pennsylvania State University for this well deserved award!

James F. Kasting, Evan Pugh University Professor of Geosciences at Pennsylvania State University, will receive the 2016 NAS Award in Early Earth and Life Sciences, presented this year with the Stanley Miller Medal. The composition of a planet’s atmosphere affects the climate on the planet’s surface. A thick layer of carbon dioxide, for instance, drives the temperature on Venus to a whopping 467°C. On Earth, in contrast, the atmosphere is dominated by nitrogen, but there is enough carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases to keep the surface warm enough for life. In the past, though, Earth’s atmosphere has been very different, with levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide fluctuating over time.

Kasting has made fundamental insights into this atmospheric evolution through the development of numerical models. The core of his research has been the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. He has calculated the minimum levels of carbon dioxide needed to prevent the planet from freezing into a “Snowball Earth” scenario, for instance. And he and his colleagues have used his models to determine when the planet’s carbon dioxide will run out and its water will be lost, calculating that the Earth will no longer be able to support life in another 2 billion years or less. Kasting’s studies into the evolution of carbon dioxide and other atmospheric gases—such as oxygen, methane, and nitrous oxide—have provided insight into the proliferation of life on the early Earth. He has also made major contributions in the search for life on other planets, including refining the concept of the “habitable zone”—the region around a star where a planet can support liquid water and possibly life.

http://www.nasonline.org/programs/awards/early-earth-and-life-sciences.html


#NationalAcademyofSciences  
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Cold Water Diving, 2nd Edition

John Heine​'s new book Cold Water Diving, 2nd Edition is out now and Best Publishing is beginning a series of articles that will take a closer look at diving in cold water environments including oceans, rivers, and lakes.....yep, that is me sitting on the ice, with NASA engineer Andrew Abercromby​ preparing me to head beneath the 4m thick ice of Lake Obersee, nesteled in the mountains of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. Lake Obersee does not really qualify as a temperate lake...but it does get the point across that diving beneath ice is a serious endeavor that takes planning and appropriate training to pull off safely and efficiently. Anyone that is interested in heading beneath the ice or even into cold water below a thermocline should read this book and seek additional training. John has been involved with diving safety and scientific diving in both temperate and polar regions for many, many years and now serves as the Diving Safety Officer for the US Antarctic Program.  I highly reccomend this book!

#SCUBA   #Diving   #Antarctica   #SETIInstitute
In this article we discuss lakes as a cold water and ice-diving enviroment. In future articles we will look at oceans, rivers, sea ice and fresh water ice.Lakes in the temperate zone have a general seasonal pattern of thermal stratification. During the summer months, the upper two meters of lake water will absorb more than one-half of the sun’s rad...
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The last outposts on Mars

In a new paper published in the journal Astrobiology, my friends and colleagues Alfonso Davila (Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute) and  Dirk Schulze-Makuch (School of the Environment, Washington State University) speculate about where the last outposts of Martian life could be, based on their exploration of the dry limits of life on Earth. Dirk has posted a note in his blog at Air and Space Magazine, check it out:


http://www.airspacemag.com/daily-planet/martian-life-may-survive-water-atmosphere-180958047/?no-ist
And “follow the water” could be a misguided strategy.
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The Best Teacher I Never Had

A very nice tribute to physicist Richard Feynman by Bill Gates



https://www.gatesnotes.com/Education/The-Best-Teacher-I-Never-Had
A video tribute from Bill Gates to Richard Feynman: phenomenal explainer, amazing scientist, and all-around colorful guy.
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One More Chance!
 
Well, we said no more posts about our fabulous new t-shirt, but since you guys are AMAZING and helped us make this campaign such a success, Teespring extended our fundraiser until SUNDAY. So if you were feeling like you missed out on getting a Worlds Tour t-shirt or hoodie of your very own, fear no more! You have just over 72 hours to help us reach 1,000 shirts sold, enjoy some beautiful artwork by our very own Danielle Futselaar, and fund our research and outreach programs.

As a reminder, the sale of 1,000 shirts provides funding for:
• Three months of our weekly colloquium - SETI Talks, including YouTube recordings
• One month of our weekly radio program and podcast - "Big Picture Science"
• Two summer interns supporting major research
• New camera systems for our all-sky optical SETI survey

Visit our Teespring campaign website here to get your t-shirt: http://buff.ly/1OSPIuA
Celebrate the research and discovery of the SETI Institute's scientists - working to understand life in the universe and address the age-old question: Are we alone? Your purchase helps fund our research and supports our education and outreach programs. Join our quest!
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Women in Science Summit 2016
Hosted by the California Academy of Sciences
Thursday, January 28, 11:30 am  to 7:30 PM

Join this Google Hangout for the free broadcast!
 
Join us virtually for the Academy's first Women in Science Summit—a day-long exploration of issues surrounding women in a wide range of scientific fields. Featuring Sylvia Earle, Jane Goodall, Meg Lowman, Dawn Wright, Kate Clancy, Kathy Sullivan, and many more, the format will include keynotes, presentations, panel discussions, and Q&As. All attendees—including online participants—are encouraged to submit questions and comments. 

The final event-schedule will be posted soon; please follow our social channels (listed below) for updates.

Twitter:  @calacademy / #sciwomen16  
Facebook: California Academy of Sciences
Instagram:  @calacademy
Tumblr: heycalacademy
Snapchat: heycalacademy
This Hangout On Air is hosted by California Academy of Sciences. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
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Women in Science Summit 2016 | #SciWomen16
Thu, January 28, 11:30 AM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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New USGS video captures the mystique of the manatee. <a href="http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/magical-manatees/">Read more.</a>
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SETI Institute Worlds Tour!

Travel with the SETI Institute on our amazing missions of 2015! From the frozen lakes of Antarctica and the icy desert of Devon Island above the Arctic Circle to the New Horizons Pluto Fly-by and Kepler's discovery that planets are everywhere, our scientists have been on the leading edge of major breakthroughs in planetary science, astrobiology, and the efforts to unravel the mystery of life in the Universe.

Celebrate a Worlds Tour like no other, and show your SETI pride!

There's only one week left for you to pick up your SETI Institute "Worlds of Discovery" tee-shirt or hoodie, featuring original artwork of SETI and NASA Illustrator, Danielle Fustelaar.



Your purchase helps to fund our astrobiology research, our radio and optical SETI work, and our education and outreach programs.

The sale of 1,000 shirts provides funding for:

Three months of our weekly colloquium - SETI Talks, including YouTube recordings
One month of our weekly radio program and podcast - "Big Picture Science"
Two summer interns supporting major research
New camera systems for our all-sky optical SETI survey
Don't miss this opportunity to be "SETI-cool" and to support our quest!

Click on the link below to purchase or learn more:
https://teespring.com/seti-institute-worlds-tour

Many thanks,
Bill Diamond
President and CEO

  #SETIInstitute  
Celebrate the research and discovery of the SETI Institute's scientists - working to understand life in the universe and address the age-old question: Are we alone?  Your purchase helps fund our research and supports our education and outreach programs. Join our quest!
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  • Carl Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, SETI Institute
    Scientist, 1993 - present
    I am a scientist and an explorer and I conduct interesting and unusual research in some of the most extreme and remote places on the planet. I carry out research to understand how microbial life is able to exist in extreme environments on Earth. I use the resulting scientific findings to better understand Earth’s earliest biosphere and to help guide the search for life elsewhere such as on the planet Mars.
  • Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Co.
    Principal Scientist, 1987 - 1993
    Provided programmatic support for NASA's Space Life Sciences Division (mainly Exobiology, CELSS, Biospherics programs), NASA HQ, Washington, D.C.
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Job Description: To Explore the Unknown
Introduction

Dale T. Andersen, Ph.D.

Expertise: Limnology/Astrobiology

Affiliation: Carls Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, SETI Institute 

Fellow Member, 1987 The Explorers Club

Help Support Dale's Research!

https://www.teamseti.org/supportdale

Your support will enable our continued research of one of the most beautiful and fascinating ecosystems on the planet – one we discovered while diving beneath thick Antarctic ice.  Our work is a journey of discovery – one that encompasses adventure, curiosity, imagination, leadership and courage along with a burning desire to advance knowledge. Importantly, we are seeking adequate funding to support our ongoing efforts of scientific research, technical analyses and syntheses of scientific information that will help explain critical emerging issues pertaining to the conservation and preservation of fragile ecosystems in Antarctica. 

Certification/Education:

BS Biology, Va Tech 

Ph.D.,  Physical Geography, McGill University


Job Description: To Explore the Unknown


Dale has been a Principal Investigator at the SETI Institute’s Center for the Study of Life in the Universe since 1993.  During this time, his research has focused on microbial ecosystems in extreme environments including areas of the Arctic, Antarctic, Atacama Desert, Death Valley and Siberia.


Dale’s research interests are with the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe and he has been involved with NASA’s Exobiology and Astrobiology programs since the mid 1980’s.  He is interested in locating, characterizing and understanding environments where physical and chemical conditions approach or exceed the tolerances for life. This includes biogeochemical processes occurring in polar lakes, oceans, and springs, or in lithic environments such as sandstones or retrogressive thaw slumps harbouring massive ground ice. Of particular interest are the physical controls and ecological impacts that perennial ice-covers and thick continuous permafrost have on the structure and function of microbial ecosystems.


Dale has participated in field research in polar regions for more than 30 years having participated and led 14 expeditions to the Antarctic (each lasting 4.5-6 months on the continent) and over twenty-six expeditions to the Arctic. Dale helped pioneer scientific research diving in the perennially ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys and the Bunger Hills and has made more than 600 dives beneath polar ice, north and south.  Dale was the first to use remotely operated vehicle (ROV) technology in the Antarctic to help explore lake and marine environments and as a PI at the SETI Institute he helped develop and utilize telepresence technology to extend the capabilities of the underwater ROV’s. 


Dale’s research has been featured in numerous newspaper and popular journals such as National Geographic and Sky and Telescope as well as on the Discovery Channel Canada, National Geographic TV and in three PBS programs - Life on Ice, Antarctica and MarsLive! From Other worlds and The New Explorers - Crystal Lab.  Dale created and was the driving force behind the production of the award winning documentary Life on Ice, Antarctica and Mars and Live! From Other Worlds, a three part, interactive field trip that allowed students to make virtual dives with Dale under the ice in Antarctica while controlling telepresent rovers from their desktop computers. Dale is a Fellow Member of the Explorers Club (FN87), and an Eagle Scout.

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Bragging rights
Early internet blogger with "Dale's Dive Diary" hosted by NASA Quest in Nov-Dec 1993
Education
  • McGill University
    2004
  • McGill University
Dale Andersen's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Seasonal Thermal Stratification in Lakes
www.bestpub.com

In this article we discuss lakes as a cold water and ice-diving enviroment. In future articles we will look at oceans, rivers, sea ice and f

Cold Water Diving, 2nd Edition
www.bestpub.com

About the Book Cold water and ice diving can be extremely challenging and require planning, preparation, training, and safety. This book by

Home
www.livescience.com

Groundbreaking developments in science, space, technology, health, the environment, our culture and history

COLUMN: Beneath 10 feet of ice
www.vagazette.com

LAKE PLACID Dale Andersen is one of only five human beings in history who have explored the depth of Lake Untersee, by diving through a hole

Lake Untersee, South Basin #1
gigapan.org

Lake Untersee, Dec 1 2011. Lake Untersee is one of the largest (11.4 km2) and deepest (&gt;160 m) freshwater lakes in East Antarctica. L