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Dale Allen Hoffman
Works at The Aramaic Healing Circle
Attended Arthur P. Schalick High School
Lives in Asheville, NC USA
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Dale Allen Hoffman

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Here is an absolutely essential quote from the one and only, late (blessed be) Archdeacon Sadook diMar Shimun from the Assyrian Church of the East which sheds very important light on the importance of proper study and the first century perspective during the "lifetime" of Yeshua, rather than that of today. The central understanding is in the last paragraph:

Archdeacon di Mar Shimun, like Dr. Paul Younan, was a native of the Middle East and a native born speaker of Aramaic. From a priestly family with a documented ancestry of almost 3,000 years, Archdeacon di Mar Shimun had unique insights and understanding of the history of the Aramaic speaking churches. Because the church and her teachings had been the focal point of his and his family’s life for almost 2,000 years, he was repository of knowledge not common in the West.

A dialog between Archdeacon di Mar Shimun and the other Foundation scholars is a case in pont: Each scholar made is renderings of the Khaburis Bible independently and then all the renderings were tested and harmonized by all the scholars in concert (see below). At one point in the process, there was a disagreement between Archdeacon di Mar Shimun and some of the other scholars regarding the rendering of the word normally translated as “neighbor” (Aramaic: Kareb). The other scholars contended that the word meant “only those in close physical proximity”, similar to our normal usage today.

Archdeacon di Mar Shimun however knew that this definition was artificially limited and that the word “neighbor” actually meant more to the ancient ramaic speaking people, specifically, “anyone you are aware of, including self”. After much correspondence and debate, Archdeacon explained the reason for the discrepancy: “I know what the problem is; the others are using those new dictionaries –  you know, the ones from the 6th century – the ones changed by the Moslem invaders. We must be using the definitions from the 1st century to be true to the understandings of the ancients.”

To which I say, "Indeed"!
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Thank you. I needed to hear these words tonight.

Dale Allen Hoffman

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Beautiful photos from my Mountain Light Sanctuary retreats in 2013 and 2014 in the ancient Appalachian mountains!
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Why are we not allowed to ask questions about factual religious history, especially within Christianity? PART 2 of 2
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Dale Allen Hoffman

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While your comment is admirable, it is not quite correct. Noohra is a reflective light such as moon (shemsha) light, conscious, human light/awareness, bright, etheric, illumined/illuminated, explain, enlighten, become aware of, etc. Of course, noohara and noheyr are both forms of noohra/noher. Lampiyada is a physical light such as a lamp, candle or simply a physical “light”, though not sunlight. Shragah is a light, lamp, wick or candle, as in that which we “hide under a bushel (satah) basket. Qaleel means “light”, little/small, quick or swift, connoting brisk action from a perspective of a very present moment awareness that does not require much thought or decision making but is, in a word, instantaneous, much like the actions of a “prophet” (anbiyah/nabeeyah).
 
B’ahra is sun light, not a NOT reflective light of awareness, as noohra is, and b’ahra means purely “dawn”, “twilight” or “gloaming”, which again means “dusk” or “twilight”. Closely related to b’ahra would be barak/baraq/barek, which means “gleaming” or “facets”. B’ahra is a soft, though still very much a direct light from shemsha (the sun). Though noohra is at times used as the word “fire”, it is rarely done so unless there is an error in word usage unless as a “fire” of consciousness. Contemporary Syriac is VERY different from 1st and 2nd century Aramaic, not only in meaning, context, and usage, but also in pronunciation. Of course, when looking at idioms, syntax and manners of speech, it is ever further removed.
 
The proper and correct word for “fire” is very clearly “gaozel” and definitely not noohra in light (noohra) of early Aramaic. While I am open to comments, please do at least try to keep comments accurate on my feed so as not to confuse or steer those open to learn off course. Thank you very much for your understanding!
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It's all Greek to me! Um, I mean, Aramaic....

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Beautiful memories of Pete Seeger's 85th Birthday Concert in Philly back in 2005.
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Why are we not allowed to ask questions about factual religious history, especially within Christianity? PART 1 of 2
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Have him in circles
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AskLizzE Asheville's profile photo
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Joy Ayscue's profile photo
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Aramaic Mysticism
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  • The Aramaic Healing Circle
    Aramaic Mysticism, present
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Currently
Asheville, NC USA
Previously
Southern New Jersey, USA
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Introduction
Dale Allen Hoffman http://www.daleallenhoffman.com offers a living, breathing vision of many of Yeshua’s (Jesus) most misunderstood teachings from the ancient Aramaic language in which He spoke them. Dale shares stunning insights from ancient sources including Aramaic, Greek, Hebrew and Coptic manuscripts, about the seemingly “miraculous” capacity of the human mind, our inherent Divinity and the awakening consciousness of humanity.

He has been teaching spiritual insights from the ancient Aramaic language, culture and wisdom of Yeshua for over 17 years and has been a contributing writer and featured guest for numerous publications, radio and television and is the Director of the international Aramaic Healing Circle. The essential core of Dale’s work is to help pierce through heavy religious dogma and to re-awaken the direct personal experience of the Divine Christ within ourselves, which often lies embedded within the core of original Christian, Gnostic and virtually all Sacred spiritual texts from the languages in which they were originally spoken and written.

 

Considered by many to be one of the world’s leading authorities on the direct, practical application of the ancient Aramaic teachings of Yeshua, Dale travels internationally sharing the rich spiritual wisdom which has been veiled beneath almost two millennia of misunderstandings, skewed translations, intentional manipulation and a general lack of spiritual perception. Dale has published numerous Compact Disc audio programs including “Realization of the Christ Within” and “A Being Divided Against Itself: The Most Radical Spiritual Teaching Ever”. Dale’s first book, “Echoes of an Ancient Dream: Toning the Aramaic Words of Yeshua" will be published in 2015.

 

Dale is also a former columnist, whose BeingAsheville: The Movers, the Shakers and the Peacemakers” was a monthly feature in The Indie and he is a contributing writer for the Jeff Buckley International Newsletter.

Education
  • Arthur P. Schalick High School
    1986 - 1990
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