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Dael Morris
Lives in Johannesburg
109 followers|275,706 views
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Johannesburg
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Pretoria - Taipei - Lilongwe - Blantyre - Brits
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"i was carried to Ohio in a swarm of bees"
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Dael Morris

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2 minutes closer. first time in a long time. 
The planet's ticking clock is close to running out. But there's still time to reverse course.
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Evan brought this to my attention. It's a really strong article about a pervasive, underlying bias we all share. Sadly, by its nature, the people who need it the most are most likely to ignore it. It's a very good read. 
Quick: Are you at all familiar with <em>ultralipids</em>, <em>cholarine,</em> or <em>plates of parallax</em>? All of them? One of them? None? Read on, and in a couple of paragraphs you’ll see what your answer means for your personal level of ignorance.   “The trouble with the world,” Bertrand Russell <a href="http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Bertrand_Russell">quipped</a>, “is that ...
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more terribly, terribly bad news. A.S. Byatt, writing for the Guardian, expresses my own feelings exactly:

"No writer in my lifetime has given me as much pleasure and happiness. He could do knockabout for schoolboys (and girls) but he was also subtle and wise and very funny in the adult world. I loved him because almost all the characters he didn't like slowly grew more real, more interesting, more complicated perhaps to his own surprise.

He could write evil if he needed to, but if he didn’t his characters surprised us and him. His prose was layered: there was a mischievous surface, and a layer of complicated running jokes, and something steely and uncompromising that turned the reader cold from time to time. He was my unlikely hero, and saved me from disaster more than once by making me laugh and making me think.”
Author of more than 70 novels, who ‘fired the imagination of millions’, dies at his home eight years after Alzheimer’s diagnosis
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Shit. bad news all around. 
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David Carr died yesterday. I had never heard of him, but the news was all over the internet. He wrote for the New York Times, and apparently affected many, many people. He was fundamentally one of the good guys. I found this, this afternoon, when curiosity drive me to follow up one of the eulogies.

This, below, is an excerpt from his autobiographical Night of the Gun. He writes about crack, and shitty lives, and the ways in which they combine, and the ways they turned into something else. I am really moved by it.

Much of what he writes here is true. I can attest to that. It has the authenticity of lived experience, revealed, rather than made palatable. I also have stories like these. I could talk about street life, and intermittent homelessness, and an inelegant experimentation with drugs, and of tremendous damage I inflicted and that was inflicted on me, both deliberately and accidentally. I can talk about shabby decisions, and really shitty choices and fear, about cheap hotels, and worried nights. I also now have a - reasonably - reputable career.

I tend not to talk about this, generally. Not out of shame - I feel zero shame, just some regret for time wasted, and some sympathy for a kid who knew nothing - but out of frustration. Frustration with people. People fall into camps. They sympathise, when I don't feel I need it, or they insist on victimhood, and I don't feel victimised. Often, failing those, they insist on my being a reformed monster, a redemption story, one way to properly locate what I say, and thereby be sure of having the appropriate reactions. This requires me to atone in some fashion, usually dictated by the proposer of that particular story. 

None of these stories are true. Things just happen the way they happen. Then other things happen. Then you die. I don't know how the first thing happened, nor the second, and I don't know how they became the next thing. I'm pretty sure no-one does. I'm also sure it's not important to know. Or relevant. You could string these events together, and connect them to other earlier events, all day. I know, because I have.  But that's just narrative and while entertaining, it's not true. 

Specifically, I don't feel shaped by these experiences, much to the chagrin of many people, who seem to require that I be so. They are what happened. This is what is happening now. In the future something else will be what is happening. I don't cling to old things any more, and as we speak, I'm trying not to cling to new things either. As far as I know, that's what happens. Then you die.

There is a truth, somewhere, in everything, but it's hard to find, harder to hold onto and harder even to remember. It's also, always, uniquely personal. I made all my own decisions and the reasons for them are often only known to me, whether they're socially scandalous or entirely sweet. while I'm accountable for my consequences, I'm defined by my decisions, and those are not visible from the outside.

As much as my complete lack of necessary skills put me on the street, so too did my burning desire to find out what it was like, to Neal-Cassady my life. That latter matters to me, because it tells me something about myself, while the former is just circumstance and history. It tells me that I have a kind of literary romanticism, and a kind of naivete, and these things help me understand myself, while the outcomes of my choices tell me that I am resilient, and pretty dumb, and that I should plan better. 

This, below, is a really good piece of writing. Even if you haven't experiences like these of your own, you'll be the better for reading it. It's such a great, lovely piece of writing, about a man and about a person. 
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Have him in circles
109 people
Angus McEwan's profile photo
Sarah Gordon's profile photo
Roy Blumenthal's profile photo
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Dael Morris

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unemployed, narcissistic Western Muslims move to the Middle East, where they  kill and behead native middle-eastern Muslims. Call it the "Islamic State". 
BEIRUT: A new video released by the Islamic State group on Sunday shows its fighters cutting off the heads of eight men.
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such an intelligent approach to tactics in this interview. applicable to politics, family, office work and interpersonal relationships. sadly. we may not have the time on many issues. 
One of the biggest political personalities of our time tells Salon about his new memoir and his theory of change
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South African Tourism finally goes viral 
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instalment 10,017 of "Movies I Cannot Wait To See"
The first Iranian Vampire Western ever made, Ana Lily Amirpour’s debut basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful mash-up of genre, archetype, and iconography, its prolific...
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wonderfully, wonderfully, wonderfully worth watching :)
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This is quite lovely.
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