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We are pleased to announce the latest release of SunPy - 0.6.0 "Thesis".

The major changes in this release are:

* Most functions throughout the SunPy code base now expect Astropy Quantity objects, and return Astropy Quantity objects.

* Python 2.6 support has ended, we do not expect this release to work under Python 2.6.

* Sample data has been removed from SunPy but helpers for downloading sample data have been added to sunpy.data.

* TimeRange has a new property based API, e.g. start and end are now properties.

* SunPy colormaps are now registered with matplotlib, allowing their use from imshow and similar functions after the import of sunpy.cm.

* Solar rotation calculation functionality has been added, along with functionality to de-rotate MapCubes.
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Nice, very nice!
 
It's breathtaking to consider this!
#humans #science #universe
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Open forum  - 
 
I've just watched +Stephen Downes's  intro video for #OCL4ed and made me think in conspiracy (not much... but enough).  I'm a researcher and as such I've been always in support of #openaccess / #openscience.  I see advantages everywhere, science will evolve faster, scientist around the world could re-run the experiments, etc... - of course, a lot of editorials will have to change their models... but that's nothing new in evolution.

Now, I had never thought in Open Education too much... I was seeing as a natural extension of open science.  However, when Stephen mentioned about costs to government stroke me the idea that governments (in most of the countries I've been) have the absolute control of primary and secondary eduction.  In my country of origin the education has been changed every time the government does... So, I don't think they are worried about material costs but about control. 
I'm not hopeless though, like to see how in countries like Finland they take education more seriously and thinking on the long term... plus they also support openness.
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DVD PS's profile photoWayne Mackintosh's profile photo
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Yes, South Africa is a leader. The first OER declaration was signed in SA and Unisa, Africa's largest university has adopted an OER policy- see http://oeru.org/news/oeru-partner-unisa-approves-oer-strategy/
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Version 0.5.0 of SunPy has just been released!!

This release includes the ability to co-align map cubes via template matching using scikit image; massive improvements to Map.rotate() which now utilises scikit image's transform submodule and includes an implementation of the aiaprep calibration routine for SDO/AIA data; as well as the ability to calculate GOES temperature and emission measure from GOES fluxes.

This release consists of 772 commits from 21 people including 9 new contributors. Special mentions to Daniel Ryan and Andrew Leonard who have both contributed their first major features to SunPy for this release. They contributed the GOES temperature and rotation/aiaprep code respectively.

This version of SunPy can be downloaded in the usual fashion from PyPI or http://sunpy.org. The full release announcement can be found here.
Skip to main content. Toggle navigation SunPy · About · Blog · Docs · Contribute · Help · Google+. SunPy. The community-developed, free and open-source solar data analysis environment for Python. Download Release Download Latest.
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Discussion  - 
 
SunPy is spreading fast!! and with new applications!! :)
 
Preparing my talk for Austria
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Awesome!! Tools that uses SunPy!!

Congratulations +Jose Iván Campos 
 
It's a pleasure for me to share with you my first international publication... Like said one of my advisor Utz Dominik "now you are an official member of the scientific community... with your first publication". Thanks Dom, Santiago Vargas and Professor Benjamín Calvo
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CEAB...38...67C
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Nice, very nice!
 
It's breathtaking to consider this!
#humans #science #universe
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That is deep man !!!:)
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Vocation or profession forum  - 
 
I'm not a teacher... or I don't consider myself as a proper one (yet)- I've never had to teach a course, but as part of my job (research) I have to teach some bits to different students of diverse age groups so and then.  So, for me was not a vocational at all... however, I think I like it. During the last year I've been trying to learn more about the *art* of "teaching" (Yeah, I think it's an art more than anything), and I find it that it's not anything of other world - anyone, dedicate enough, can learn it (and enjoy it).
Some learn teaching earlier than others, some by curiosity - even unconsciously while explaining things to his/her classmates - others by need (the only job opportunity after certain degree; eg. researchers that have to teach as part of their contract in a university).  Therefore, I think the distinction of vocation/profession comes.  Both can be really good but they need to have the motivation for it... and sometimes, just seeing that just only one of the students have learnt from you can bring that motivation up (and hopefully improve to make all learn). #OCL4Ed  
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Space  - 
 
Classify #Sunspots and help us to understand how ugly a sunspot have to look in order to make #solarflares.
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Help us to understand how sunspots complexity links with flare activity!

¡También en español!
 ·  Translate
 
New data on Sunspotter! Time to get comparing sunspots. http://buff.ly/1iuhOu6
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John Walsh's profile photoStuart Mumford's profile photoFede Ago's profile photo
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"...they gave elementary school children either a blue T-shirt or a red T-shirt to wear throughout the school day for six weeks.

"Teachers treated those color groups in the same ways they would use gender. Teachers said, “Good morning, blue and red kids!,” “Let’s line up blue, red, blue, red.” Kids had their names on either a red or blue bulletin board and had either a red or blue name card on their desk. But again, teachers had to treat both groups equally and not allow them to compete with one another. They simply “used” color in the same way many teachers “use gender.”

"After only four weeks, children formed stereotypes about their color groups. They liked their own group better than the other group. Red-shirted children would say, “Those blue-shirt kids are not as smart as the red-shirt kids.” Just like they do with gender, they said that “all blue kids” act one way and “no red kids” act another way (this differed based on which group they were in). They began to segregate themselves, playing with kids from their own color group more than with those from the other group.

"They were also more willing to help kids in their own color groups. Children walked into a classroom in which we had staged two partially completed puzzles. We had surreptitiously draped a red shirt across one puzzle and a blue shirt across the other. When given the option, children were more likely to help out the child they thought was in their group.

"In all of these studies, there was always a very important control group—in addition to the group of students who wore colored T-shirts, there were classes in which the teacher who didn’t talk about the color groups. She didn’t sort by color or use the color grouping to label each child. In other words, it was like being in a class of boys and girls where the teacher doesn’t mention or sort by gender; she simply treated them like individuals. In these classes, children didn’t form stereotypes and biased attitudes about groups. If the adults ignored the groups, even when there were very visible differences, children ignored the groups too. [...]

"... it seems that children pay attention to the groups that adults treat as important. When we repeatedly say, “Look at those girls playing!” or “Who is that boy with the blue hat?,” children assume that being a boy or girl must be a really important feature about that person. In fact, it must the single most important feature of that person. Otherwise, why would we point it out all the time?

"If children see a difference, they look to experts in the world (us grown-ups) to see if the difference is important or not. Don’t forget that they see plenty of differences in people. For example, they see differences in hair color. We come in brown hair, black hair, blond hair, red hair, and gray hair. But no adult ever labels this visible category, saying “Look at that brown hair kid.” “Okay, all the brown-haired kids and black-haired kids over here. All the red- and blond-haired kids over there.” Children ultimately learn to ignore these as meaningful categories, but they still notice they exist. If I ask someone’s hair color, a child can tell me. It just isn’t a meaningful category. They don’t develop attitudes about what it means to have red hair or brown hair (even the occasional blond joke isn’t constant enough for children to notice).

"But with gender, children notice the difference and adults make it meaningful. Children see the category. We made sure of that with our pink or blue shirts. Also, the experts in the world, their parents, always label the category. We put a figurative flashing neon arrow on gender and say “Pay Attention! Important Information Here!” And guess what, they pay attention."
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