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Dániel Darabos
Lives in Budapest, Hungary
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Dániel Darabos

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My PyWeek #20 entry with Alexander Malmberg. I haven't had time to check out the other entries. There's one week left of the judging period. I'll report back when we get our ratings!
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This game above all others teaches us the importance of SSDs.
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Dániel Darabos

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Google Maps #deepdream  mode.
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I'm translating a tiny novel to English. The Google Ngram Viewer is my best friend. Just now I started wondering if you write "Hello," said the man or "Hello," the man said. Google Ngram Viewer tells me it depends on the date. If it is between 1970 and 2006, then the man said, otherwise said the man.

It's become clear I will never understand the English language, but now I don't have to. Thanks, Google Ngram Viewer!
Google Ngram Viewer: '[said the man]', '[the man said]', 1800-2008 in English.
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Stepan, are you in Mountain View now? If so, then I ordered a few books to the right name & address! If they actually arrive, can you give one to Dina and Jan and say hi for me?
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I made a little exercise for our job posting. The job is in Hungary, but the exercise takes place on the North Pole.
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Fun? In this economic downturn? :) I'm quite happy how this turned out — we got a whole bunch of great candidates. I can once again devote 90% of my time to interviewing!
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Dániel Darabos

Core Language  - 
 
We played some "guess what it prints" Scala games at work. How about this one?

val i = Seq(1, 2, 3, 4, 5).iterator
val a = i.take(2).toSeq
val b = i.take(2).toSeq
a.foreach(println)
b.foreach(println)
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I'm gonna throw up
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China's Chang'e 3 JADE RABBIT landed on the Moon!

China's Chang'e 3 JADE RABBIT landed on the Moon live footage from MOON.China's Chang'e-3 and the lunar rover Yutu (Jade Rabbit) have landed on the lunar surface at 1:11 pm UTC on Saturday. The duo were launched by a Long March 3B on December 1, which was followed by a nominal flight into lunar orbit and subsequently China's first soft landing on the Moon.
As many as three orbital corrections were understood to be required, with the first taking place at 07:50 UTC on December 2, followed by a second at 08:20 UTC on December 3.

While the Chinese didn't report information about the second burn, it is understood a third was not required.

After entering a 100 km lunar orbit on December 6, Chang'e-3 began to prepare its systems for the most important phase of the mission -- the landing. On December 10, the probe executed a burn of its main engine to lower its altitude above the lunar surface.Upon entering lunar orbit, Chang'e-3 underwent six stages of deceleration to descend from 15 km above to the lunar surface using a variable thrust engine. During the descent the attitude of the probe was controlled using 28 small thrusters.

Following deceleration, the vehicle quickly adjusted its attitude, approaching the lunar surface. During this phase the instruments analyzed the planned descent area.

The main engine automatically shutdown at an altitude of four meters, allowing the rover to free fall on the surface.

The landing sequence was executed perfectly, resulting in the vehicle selecting its preferred landing spot almost immediately, even landing without delay, technically 30 minutes ahead of schedule.

After the soft landing, Chang'e-3 will charge and initialize the Yutu rover that will start to communicate with mission control. After communications are established, Yutu will unlock the locking mechanism and then drive to the ladder transfer mechanism.The transfer mechanism will then be controlled to descend to the surface of the moon, and move away from Chang'e-3. Some nine hours after the separation, the Chang'e-3 and Yutu will capture some photographs of each other using the cameras.

The lander is equipped with a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) to power the lunar operations during the three-month mission. The energy will be used to power the scientific payload of seven instruments and cameras.

The Chang'e-3 lander also carries four instruments: the MastCam, the Descent Camera, the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUV).

This was the first lunar landing since Luna-24 launched on August 9, 1976. That mission touched down on the surface of the moon on August 18 of that year, ahead of a soil retrieving mission that returned to Earth six days later.
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Dániel Darabos

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I'm reading The Feynman Lectures on Physics at a rate of one paragraph every few months. It's very nice. I just came across this gem: "light is unpolarized only if we are unable to find out whether the light is polarized or not."
Caltech and The Feynman Lectures Website are pleased to present this online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Now, anyone with internet access and a web browser can enjoy reading a high quality up-to-date copy of Feynman's legendary lectures. However, we want to be clear that this ...
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Time travel is the best plot device. I can't even remember a bad movie with time travel. 12 Monkeys, Los Cronocrímenes, Steins;Gate, Looper, Interstellar, etc. Is there any narrative invention that compares?
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+Conor Hennessy
I wanted to write this. One exception :D
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I did a presentation last week about stuff I work on. Check it out if you want to know what that is (spoiler: it's a graph analytics application built on Apache Spark) or how my presentation worked out!
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impressive.

thank you very much :)
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Misc. Dialog & Discussion  - 
 
Do you know if Scala development has a policy on fixing bugs?

All the time I run into compiler bugs (e.g. https://issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-1570, https://issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-3664) that are marked as unresolved and major and had been reported 4+ years ago. If I were a Scala developer, I would say let's try to fix 10% of such bugs before adding the next wild new feature. Do you think there's any chance of something like that?
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+Dániel Darabos Ah. You might be right. However, given the specific problem you were wanting to tackle, it seemed something the Typelevel guys might value a bit more highly than the Typesafe guys.

Another intuition I have is this: Attempting to integrate it into the Typelevel repository will likely require a smaller effort only because there is a lot of cruft and noise around Typesafe (a good part of the reason Typelevel has forked). And if it is a valueable fix (i.e. it closes an obvious and simple type hole in the system), it will find its way from the Typelevel repository to the Typesafe repository anyway.
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The accidental sinking of the USS Guitarro nuclear submarine during its construction in 1969 delayed the work by 32 months and cost 15-20 million USD. The postmortem is a good read!
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Yes, one person working alone is a weak spot in itself.  I suppose a process for reviewing and reanalysing what you saw, what you know, how you know it and what your current hypothesis is can help.
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Why Really Old Lead Is Important to Physicists

This is a story about an old Roman shipwreck, its cargo of lead; and why it is important to the study of dark matter.

The shipwreck:
In about 50 AD, a ship set sail from Cadiz in Spain carrying cargo to Italy (probably to Rome). Having passed through the Straits of Gibraltar, the ship hugged the coastline, a course wholly different from the usual open-sea direct course that would normally be taken. The ship sank in 25 m (82 ft) of water not far off the coast of Villajoyosa, about 15 km (9 mi) NE of Alicante in Spain, after perhaps 500 km (300 mi) of sailing. Its cargo included hundreds of amphorae of garum (the Roman version of Worcestershire sauce) and about two thousand bars of lead each weighing about 33 kg (52 lb). When discovered in 2000, the remnants of the 36 m (120 ft) long ship were named the Bou Ferrer shipwreck.    ⓐ

Nuclear physicists finance the archeological recovery of the ship
The expense of examining such a wreck using proper archaeological techniques was considerable. When Ettore Fiorini, a nuclear physicist at the University of Milan-Bicocca, read about the find, he offered the National Archaeological Museum of Cagliari in Sardinia the financial support of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) in excavating the vessel and its cargo. In return, a portion of the antique lead (amounting to less than 15 percent, or about 9 metric tons) would be turned over to INFN for use in physics experiments. Archaeological support always being excruciatingly tight, Cagliari agreed to the bargain.  ⓐ

Why use the old lead.
Why would an expensive archeological shipwreck recovery be financed by nuclear physicists?  It was for the 2000 year old lead. 
Lead, offering as it does a convenient combination of density and formability, is the first line of defense for radiation shielding. However, newly smelted lead contains a radioactive lead isotope, Pb-210, which is generated in the decay of U-238. While the uranium and other radioactive elements are largely removed during the smelting process, the Pb-210 remains, producing a low-level radioactive decay (about 200 decays per kilogram per second) that restricts the ability of the most sensitive nuclear and particle physics experiments to function.  ⓐ

Pb-210, however, has a 22.3 year half-life. When lead bars have lain underwater for 2,000 years, all of the Pb-210 has decayed, leaving "Roman lead" (or old lead) with a radioactive level roughly 100,000 times lower than is found in new lead.  ⓐ

The use of old lead for shielding increases the sensitivity of our most delicate experiments by orders of magnitude, an increase that is crucial when looking for a reaction that sheds light on new physics. Lead recovered from roofs, old plumbing, and even stained glass windows has been used, but Roman lead from a shipwreck is the best you can find.  ⓐ

The archeologists got the expensive study of the Bou Ferrer shipwreck funded, and the physicists got small portion of the valuable lead to use in the study of dark matter.  It was a win win for both branches of science. 

Ethical issues
There are ethical issues that arise from the destruction of ancient artifacts for a modern physics study.  And scientists on both sides are concerned. University of Birmingham Professor Elena Perez Alvaro, has written a paper on the subject.  
Experiments on Particle Physics Using Underwater Cultural Heritage: The Dilemma
He concludes:
The study of sunken vessels is essential to history because entire continents have been discovered, colonized, invaded and defended by sea. The salvage of this material should be done under the surveillance of an archaeological team.  ⓑ

On the other hand, not so far in the future, the development and operation of new sciences and technologies – make it likely that further investigation, development and use of the underwater cultural heritage for other purposes may occur.  If boundaries are not well defined, a “first come, first served” approach may occur.  ⓑ

New uses of the oceans and their patrimony have recently been invoked by relevant international law of sea actors and their instruments. It is necessary to identify gaps and suggestions in order to analyse whether and to what extent the existing rules can be applied or modified to adequately deal with these new uses.  Compromise does not equal defeat; sometimes, it is the only path to success. Guidelines are necessary ‘for the benefit of humankind’  ⓑ 

ⓐ  http://www.gizmag.com/relics-physics-archaeology-roman-lead/30032/

 ⓑ  http://www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk/Colloquium2013/perezalvaro.pdf

Photo: Directorate-General de Cultura, Alicante, Spain
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cyhawk, Daniel Darabos, Darabos Dániel
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Visiting from Europe it felt like a unique and authentic place to me. I'm not even sure if it's a hot dog place or a beer warehouse.
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Looks like a very high class restaurant but the prices were modest, the staff was friendly and the portions were satisfying. We enjoyed our lunch a lot!
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