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Center for Victims of Torture
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New on our blog: Burma in Minnesota. CVT volunteer Laurie Bangs writes about a heartwarming visit to the St. Paul Como Conservatory with a Burmese client.
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We are proud today to announce our membership in the Group of Friends of the Convention against Torture Initiative. Curt Goering, our executive director, says, "We look forward to a deeper collaboration with global partners dedicated to wiping out torture and working for full implementation of the Convention, including the right to rehabilitation."
ST. PAUL, Minn. — The Center for Victims of TortureTM (CVT) today announced it has become a member of the Group of Friends of the Convention against Torture Initiative (CTI). In joining, CVT has united with experts such as UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Juan Mendez and organizations such as ...
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Read how volunteer Shaili Zappa uses her Spanish expertise to support New Tactics in Human Rights and human rights defenders.
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“Minnesota Monthly” magazine has posted photos from our Restoring Hope breakfast – including quotes from Vice President Walter Mondale and other attendees. We’re so grateful for everyone’s support.
On October 1, the Center for Victims of Torture held its sixth annual fundraising and networking breakfast at Hyatt Regency Minneapolis. The organization provides support for torture survivors...
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On Wednesday, the Senate voted down the American Security Against Foreign Enemies (SAFE) Act of 2015. This legislation would have created insurmountable obstacles for Syrian and Iraqi refugees hoping to resettle in the U.S. In a blog post for “Just Security,” Annie Sovcik, CVT’s director of our Washington office, wrote that “In rejecting the SAFE Act, the Senate preserved a lifeline for some of the most vulnerable refugees in the world at a time of record global displacement.” Read “What the Senate Preserved in Blocking the Safe Act” online.
Too often, when political decisions are driven by fear, the pressure on lawmakers to do “something” outweighs efforts toward creating sound
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I am a helpless victim of psychological torture I don't understand how this has been alowed to happen to me refused medical help since 2009.
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Marie Soueid, CVT policy counsel, urges accountability after listening to the stories of dozens of Syrian refugee survivors of torture and war atrocities. Read her blog post: "A Political Solution in Syria Must Not Sacrifice Accountability."
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Today we released a new report, “Reclaiming Hope, Dignity and Respect: Syrian and Iraqi Torture Survivors in Jordan.” The product of two years of in-person interviews and study, the report is based on the stories of 64 men, women and children who either faced torture in their home countries or had close family members tortured and are working to rebuild their lives.
CVT's report Reclaiming Hope, Dignity and Respect: Syrian and Iraqi Torture Survivors in Jordan, the product of two years of in-person interviews and study, is based on the stories of 64 men, women and children who either faced torture in their home countries or had close family members tortured ...
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Have them in circles
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Physiotherapist/trainer April Gamble and her work in Jordan are featured in this piece. Director of External Relations Peter Dross is quoted as well.
TRAVERSE CITY — A sense of familiarity washes over April Gamble as a middle-aged Iraqi man limps into her clinic in Amman, Jordan. His mannerisms remind the Cadillac woman of
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The Center for Victims of Torture and The Humphrey School of Public Affairs present a screening and panel discussion of Refugee: The Eritrean Exodus.

The 2015 film follows Chris Cotter, an American traveler, as he explores a common migration path through Ethiopia and into Israel, tracking the plight of Eritrean refugees. Chris and his crew visit several refugee camps, including the never-before-documented Afar region. The refugees tell stories of oppression, torture, and survival. The outlook is bleak, but the spirit of the Eritrean refugees is hard to ignore.

A panel discussion will follow the film and feature: Exodus director, Chris Cotter; CVT's Director of International Services, Neal Porter; The Humphrey School's Diplomat-in-Residence, Dr. Mary Curtin; and East African community leader and Director of the Brian Coyle Center, Amano Dube.

Immediately following the screening and discussion, guests are invited to attend a happy hour at the nearby Red Sea Bar & Restaurant hosted by the Humphrey School's student group Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Development (IPID).

Please be sure to reserve your ticket at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/refugee-the-eritrean-exodus-film-screening-discussion-tickets-21271441454 .
Refugee: The Eritrean Exodus
Thu, March 3, 6:00 PM
Cowles Auditorium, The Humphrey School of Public Affairs, 301 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455

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Alan Goldfarb is today’s guest blogger. An attorney and member of our Public Policy Committee, he writes about barriers to refugees and asylum-seekers due to far-reaching definitions of terrorism. Read his blog post “Mislabeling Refugees as Terrorists.”
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"While many refugees describe feeling much safer in Jordan than Syria, life as a refugee is extremely difficult: humanitarian assistance is limited, cost of living is high and most refugees are strictly prohibited from working. Few refugees see a future for themselves or their families in Jordan. On the other hand, to return to Syria at this point remains equivalent to suicide." Annie Sovcik, director of CVT's Washington, D.C. office writes on our blog about Syrian refugees considering their futures. Read “Seeking Hope: Syrian Refugees Consider the Future.”
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St. Paul Pioneer Press columnist Ruben Rosario writes about the “Reclaiming Hope, Dignity and Respect” report we issued earlier this week in his column “Snapshots of 3 who went through hell, still have hope.” Note: graphic content is included in the article.
Lawyer Annie Sovcik found him patiently sitting in the interview room, a Syrian refugee in his early 40s, a family man who shared with her at the start his love for playing soccer until the world came crashing down on him.
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People
Have them in circles
60 people
Alison Beckman's profile photo
Marshall Washick's profile photo
Luc Hale's profile photo
April DeJarlais's profile photo
Mark Fetzko's profile photo
Joanathan Ng's profile photo
Brad B's profile photo
Organized Stalking Canada's profile photo
Energie der Wahrheit's profile photo
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877.265.8775, 612.436.4800
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The Center for Victims of Torture (CVT) exists to heal the wounds of torture and war on individuals, their families and their communities, and to stop its practice.
Introduction
The Center for Victims of Torture works toward a future in which torture ceases to exist and its victims have hope for a new life. We are an international nonprofit dedicated to healing survivors of torture and violent conflict. We provide direct care for those who have been tortured, train partners around the world who can prevent and treat torture, and advocate for human rights and an end to torture.

At the Center for Victims of Torture, we are forging new ways to advance human rights and build a future free from torture. Through research, training, advocacy and our healing services for survivors, each initiative we undertake plays a role in building a larger vision for the torture rehabilitation movement. We provide a bridge between torture victims, the local community and society as a whole, working to restore the dignity of the human spirit one survivor at a time.